izzyjane0807
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I'm interested in studying it at A level this coming september and am curious as to what it's like?


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Schrödingers Cat
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Which exam board? I did A level chem under OCR.

Generally I actually really enjoyed it, one of my favorite subjects. The first unit is mainly reaction mechanisms and organic chemistry which is fairly easy to learn and no maths at all. The second unit is the opposite, lots of maths and calculations about entropy and enthalpy and buffers etc.

Look at the course specification to see what topics will come up, but as it's this late on in the academic year why are you asking this question now is what I'm curious about.
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izzyjane0807
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
Which exam board? I did A level chem under OCR.

Generally I actually really enjoyed it, one of my favorite subjects. The first unit is mainly reaction mechanisms and organic chemistry which is fairly easy to learn and no maths at all. The second unit is the opposite, lots of maths and calculations about entropy and enthalpy and buffers etc.

Look at the course specification to see what topics will come up, but as it's this late on in the academic year why are you asking this question now is what I'm curious about.
thank you! I would be doing OCR too. I am asking now because I start college in September and am trying to decide on courses before I apply.


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username1445490
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The A level courses starting in 2015 will be different to the ones now.
The new A levels are purely linear with all exams taken at the end. The practical assessment does not form part of the grade but will be pass/fail.
The idea is that the new A levels will be more demanding.
Looking at content the OCR specification is pretty similar with the 'green' chemistry and sustainability removed and a couple of slightly more demanding things in the second year.
Look at the OCR website for info
http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications...432-from-2015/

This pdf explains the changes
http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/171359-...y-overview.pdf
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Eleanor303
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Hi there, I have just started college and finished my first term of Chemistry AS (OCR). So far it is no harder than GCSE except from 1 or 2 topics which are not difficult to understand. I had been told that Chemistry is the hardest A level but it really isn't as long as you understand the basics. If you are doing AQA Chemsitry Unit 2 for GCSE then a lot of the topics are the same and doing Triple science has helped with titration calculations. I can't speak for the entire course but so far it has been an easy and enjoyable topic.

However, there are quite a few people in my class struggling with it but I would say as long as you do well at GCSE then you will be fine! What is your predicted grade and are you doing additional or triple?
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username1445490
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(Original post by Eleanor303)
Hi there, I have just started college and finished my first term of Chemistry AS (OCR). So far it is no harder than GCSE except from 1 or 2 topics which are not difficult to understand. I had been told that Chemistry is the hardest A level but it really isn't as long as you understand the basics. If you are doing AQA Chemsitry Unit 2 for GCSE then a lot of the topics are the same and doing Triple science has helped with titration calculations. I can't speak for the entire course but so far it has been an easy and enjoyable topic.

However, there are quite a few people in my class struggling with it but I would say as long as you do well at GCSE then you will be fine! What is your predicted grade and are you doing additional or triple?
You are right to say the individual topics are not difficult but what makes chemistry a demanding A level is having to understand the concepts and learn a lot of factual content and then be able to draw it all together to apply it in unfamiliar situations in an exam under time pressure.
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DustToDust
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
Which exam board? I did A level chem under OCR.

Generally I actually really enjoyed it, one of my favorite subjects. The first unit is mainly reaction mechanisms and organic chemistry which is fairly easy to learn and no maths at all. The second unit is the opposite, lots of maths and calculations about entropy and enthalpy and buffers etc.

Look at the course specification to see what topics will come up, but as it's this late on in the academic year why are you asking this question now is what I'm curious about.
If I take chemistry at A level it will be on OCR. How much harder did it get from GCSE to A level? What did you get in your GCSE?

I have an A in core and additional and i'm predicted an A for further. I struggle with some of it but I think that's because I don't really try/listen in school... If I work really hard in college should I be okay with chemistry? I would want a grade B at the lowest.Thanks
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Schrödingers Cat
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(Original post by DustToDust)
If I take chemistry at A level it will be on OCR. How much harder did it get from GCSE to A level? What did you get in your GCSE?

I have an A in core and additional and i'm predicted an A for further. I struggle with some of it but I think that's because I don't really try/listen in school... If I work really hard in college should I be okay with chemistry? I would want a grade B at the lowest.Thanks
Hey,

IMO I thought GCSE chemistry was quite easy, got an A*. I thought that chemistry got a lot harder at A-level but only the second module, I got 88% in the first unit and 72% in the second one and 82.5% in the practical for AS-Level so got a B and was one mark off an A .

A2 -Level got a lot harder for me but I put in the effort and achieved an A

As long as you work hard at A-Level you'll be fine, my advice for chemistry is do loads of past papers, I mean everyone twice as its very application based. Do this and you'll be fine
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Pomum96
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(Original post by izzyjane0807)
I'm interested in studying it at A level this coming september and am curious as to what it's like?


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It was my favourite a-level. But that's largely to do with my teachers and classmates. We had really relaxed lessons. Chem can be very challenging at A2 level (not so bad at AS) but still worth it.
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username1445490
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
Hey,

IMO I thought GCSE chemistry was quite easy, got an A*. I thought that chemistry got a lot harder at A-level but only the second module, I got 88% in the first unit and 72% in the second one and 82.5% in the practical for AS-Level so got a B and was one mark off an A .

A2 -Level got a lot harder for me but I put in the effort and achieved an A

As long as you work hard at A-Level you'll be fine, my advice for chemistry is do loads of past papers, I mean everyone twice as its very application based. Do this and you'll be fine
Like I said in an earlier post the A level course starting in Sept will be very different particularly in terms of the exam papers. The new papers will be far more challenging and you will have to take all exams at the end of 2 years. So remember there will be no past papers to practice.
There is often a 2 grade difference between GCSE and A level. A* at GCSE often get A or B and A at GCSE get B or C and B grade at GCSE in my experience get C or D at A level. A lot depends or your ability and work ethic. A student you works incredibly hard at GCSE but does not find it easy could still get an A at GCSE but then have reached their ceiling and drop hugely at A level. Whereas someone who is very able but does not work so hard at GCSE and gets an A could do well at A level if they change their study habits and work hard.
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Schrödingers Cat
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(Original post by Madasahatter)
Like I said in an earlier post the A level course starting in Sept will be very different particularly in terms of the exam papers. The new papers will be far more challenging and you will have to take all exams at the end of 2 years. So remember there will be no past papers to practice.
There is often a 2 grade difference between GCSE and A level. A* at GCSE often get A or B and A at GCSE get B or C and B grade at GCSE in my experience get C or D at A level. A lot depends or your ability and work ethic. A student you works incredibly hard at GCSE but does not find it easy could still get an A at GCSE but then have reached their ceiling and drop hugely at A level. Whereas someone who is very able but does not work so hard at GCSE and gets an A could do well at A level if they change their study habits and work hard.
Well if that's the case then I wish them the best because they will need it. What are they thinking about taking all the exams at the end of 2 years?? How will it work when they apply to university? All they have to work on is GCSES
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username1445490
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
Well if that's the case then I wish them the best because they will need it. What are they thinking about taking all the exams at the end of 2 years?? How will it work when they apply to university? All they have to work on is GCSES
Yes the new reforms are basically a return to the A levels of old.
AS will still be available but will not count towards the grade for A level.
Universities will have to make offers based on GCSEs, any AS the student does take (but some schools will not be offering them or student will only take AS exams in the one they are giving up) and predicted grades.
We're heading back to pre 2000 days.
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Schrödingers Cat
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(Original post by Madasahatter)
Yes the new reforms are basically a return to the A levels of old.
AS will still be available but will not count towards the grade for A level.
Universities will have to make offers based on GCSEs, any AS the student does take (but some schools will not be offering them or student will only take AS exams in the one they are giving up) and predicted grades.
We're heading back to pre 2000 days.
Oh jeese, there was a reason why we moved away from the old, but obviously the government has forgotton about that. Pffft GCSES are definitely not a good predictor of Uni, coming from experience as I got average GCSES but tried harder at A -Level and average 88% in my subjects. I feel sorry for those kids.
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