Could you tell me the difference between Mitosis and Meosis please

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Tribi18
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Well the qustion is in the thread title: What is the difference between Mitosis and Meosis? Its just i'm revising biology and don't really understand it. Oh and its just GCSE answer please Thanks soo much for your help.
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Helenia
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Mitosis is the normal process of cell division, in humans producing 2 daughter cells with 46 chromosomes (a full set) each.

Meiosis is the process for forming gametes (sex cells), producing 4 daughter cells (eggs in women, sperm in men) each with 23 chromosomes.

You will need to know the difference, and their exact spellings - it's one of the ones they're picky about.
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angietash
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A way of remembering it (I'm doing gcses too with all these lil mnemonics)

miTosis: t for 2 (2 half sets of chromosoms)

conCAVE is a cave

Aren't gcses such fun :/
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Joseph
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mitosis is a type of cell division which occurs in all cells where the number of chromosomes in the daughter cells is equal to the number of chromosomes in the mother cell. Two dauyghter cells are formed from each parent cell and they are identical to each other and to the parent cell.
Meiosis is a type of cell division which occurs during the formation of gametes, and it consists of two divisions leading finally to the formation of four daughter cells from one parent cell with each daughter cell having half the number of chromosomes of the parent cell.This type of cell division leads to genetic variation.
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Ralfskini
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(Original post by Joseph)
mitosis is a type of cell division which occurs in all cells where the number of chromosomes in the daughter cells is equal to the number of chromosomes in the mother cell. Two dauyghter cells are formed from each parent cell and they are identical to each other and to the parent cell.
Meiosis is a type of cell division which occurs during the formation of gametes, and it consists of two divisions leading finally to the formation of four daughter cells from one parent cell with each daughter cell having half the number of chromosomes of the parent cell.This type of cell division leads to genetic variation.

The daughter cells of mitosis are not identical.
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MrsSnufkin
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I know that this is a bit off subject but my dad did a course on Biology.
There was a song in the book called 'The Battle Hymn of the Aerobes'
Mine eyes have seen the glory of respiratory chains
In every mitochondria intrinsic to membranes
Functionally organised in complex sub- domains
Where electrons flow along
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Where electrons flow along
Something something components three and four
Embedded in the lipid which is what the lipid's for
But that is not enough there are yet two components more
Where electrons flow along
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Where electrons flow along
The first is a amall cytochrome which rolls around the place
Easily extractable from cytoplasmic face
To restore respiration just add it back a trace
Where electrons flow along
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Where electrons flow along
The second, benzo quionene which is quite ubiquitous
It floats around the lipid's phase with hardly any fuss
In mobile pooling functions it's become synonymous
Where electrons flow along
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Glory, glory respiration
Where electrons flow along

Sorry about all the spelling mistakes and my memory is not very good
I just think that the song's quite funny
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Joseph
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(Original post by Ralfskini)
The daughter cells of mitosis are not identical.
If nothing goes wrong the vdaughter cells of mitosis will be genetically identical.
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Ellie4
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(Original post by Joseph)
If nothing goes wrong the vdaughter cells of mitosis will be genetically identical.
Seconded. The daughter cells are clones of the parent cell in mitosis, only meiosis produces genetic variation.
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samd
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(Original post by Ralfskini)
The daughter cells of mitosis are not identical.
I am afraid they are (unless infected by a cancer or a mutation occurs etc.)

For the purposes of GCSE's the daughter cells are completely identical from Mitosis.

Meisosis in the sex cells allows for genteic variation in families, thus stopping all sibilings being identical to each other.
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crana
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I have never understood why they persist in making you spout in exams "meiosis produces 4 daughter cells (eggs/sperm)"

Well, no, it produces 2 daughter cells, and 2 polar bodies that just self-destruct...

Simplification is fine, but really that's just lying
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Ellie4
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(Original post by crana)
I have never understood why they persist in making you spout in exams "meiosis produces 4 daughter cells (eggs/sperm)"

Well, no, it produces 2 daughter cells, and 2 polar bodies that just self-destruct...

Simplification is fine, but really that's just lying
At GCSE they tend to over-simplify a lot of things. Ah for the days before prokaryotes and eukaryotes when it was just an 'animal cell' or 'plant cell'. *Sigh*
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username1170
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(Original post by samdavyson)
I am afraid they are (unless infected by a cancer or a mutation occurs etc.)

For the purposes of GCSE's the daughter cells are completely identical from Mitosis.

Meisosis in the sex cells allows for genteic variation in families, thus stopping all sibilings being identical to each other.
There are two alleles that are alternative forms of the same gene. For the purposes of GCSE, all the alleles are cloned during mitosis producing two genetically identical daughter cells. However, during meiosis, the cell splits into two with half the number of chromosomes in each, and half the number of alleles. This allows for genetic variation, as the set of alleles that ends up in the cell is unknown.
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Ralfskini
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(Original post by samdavyson)
I am afraid they are (unless infected by a cancer or a mutation occurs etc.)

For the purposes of GCSE's the daughter cells are completely identical from Mitosis.

Meisosis in the sex cells allows for genteic variation in families, thus stopping all sibilings being identical to each other.

I'm afraid they're not. They may be genetically identical but that's all. Organelles are distributed randomly within the cytosol so the components of the daughter cells vary after cytokinesis.
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crana
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(Original post by Ellie4)
At GCSE they tend to over-simplify a lot of things. Ah for the days before prokaryotes and eukaryotes when it was just an 'animal cell' or 'plant cell'. *Sigh*
I know they do, but this was A-level too!
I asked "but aren't 2 of them just polar bodies that get broken down" and was told not to confuse people - i was later banned from asking questions in lessons

the only time polar bodies have been mentioned is when we did Down syndrome
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Ellie4
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(Original post by crana)
I know they do, but this was A-level too!
I asked "but aren't 2 of them just polar bodies that get broken down" and was told not to confuse people - i was later banned from asking questions in lessons

the only time polar bodies have been mentioned is when we did Down syndrome
It's just that time is so limited to get through the syllabus at GCSE (not that there's time to spare at AS but anyway!) Fundamental problem with our government and their cirriculum. Exams do not reflect intellegence, but how well you can say what the exmainers are looking for. Grr! Anyway, hang in there, and if you're this enthusiastic about bio next year, you'll fly through it!
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Ben.S.
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(Original post by crana)
I know they do, but this was A-level too!
I asked "but aren't 2 of them just polar bodies that get broken down" and was told not to confuse people - i was later banned from asking questions in lessons

the only time polar bodies have been mentioned is when we did Down syndrome
Well, that doesn't happen all the time - that's why they don't teach it! Only in females and I don't know how many species it applies to even then.

Ben
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crana
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(Original post by Ellie4)
It's just that time is so limited to get through the syllabus at GCSE (not that there's time to spare at AS but anyway!) Fundamental problem with our government and their cirriculum. Exams do not reflect intellegence, but how well you can say what the exmainers are looking for. Grr! Anyway, hang in there, and if you're this enthusiastic about bio next year, you'll fly through it!
I'm really confused......why do you keep going on about GCSE? I said - it's the same at A-level... and am also confused about me being enthusiastic about biology next year?!
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crana
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(Original post by Ben.S.)
Well, that doesn't happen all the time - that's why they don't teach it! Only in females and I don't know how many species it applies to even then.

Ben
Either way, humans are the animal species we learn most about, and it's just wrong to suggest that "4 eggs are formed" in humans from meiotic division of one oocyte. Which is what they do suggest.

Rosie
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Tribi18
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so,

what is the difference between Mitosis and Meiosis?

just a really simple, GCSE answer will be sufficent thanks
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Ellie4
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(Original post by Tribi18)
so,

what is the difference between Mitosis and Meiosis?

just a really simple, GCSE answer will be sufficent thanks
Meiosis: Sexual reproduction. Requires 2 zygotes (i.e. 1 sperm + 1 egg) Produces 4 daughter cells, genetically non-identical to the parent cells.

Mitosis: Asexual reproduction. Growth and repair. Requires 1 zygote (the parent cell). Produces 2 genetically identical daughter cells.
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