bibliboo
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One thing that's different on this access course to when I did my A levels 11 years ago is that you now have to reference everything. Back then I only had to do a bibliography at the end of an assignment, but this takes a bit of getting used to doesn't it? Any tips on this?

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alow
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Use a website that does it for you.
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gemmam
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If you use Microsoft Word there's a feature that does referencing for you; it only does certain methods though. I use an online generator myself and I've found that has worked well for me.

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Klix88
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(Original post by bibliboo)
One thing that's different on this access course to when I did my A levels 11 years ago is that you now have to reference everything. Back then I only had to do a bibliography at the end of an assignment, but this takes a bit of getting used to doesn't it? Any tips on this?

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My advice is that when you start out, there are no shortcuts. Get a copy of your uni's referencing guidelines - or the ones they direct you to follow - and follow them slavishly for both in-text references and the bibliography. Your last act before submitting any coursework, is to go through it one final time to check that the referencing is correct.

Attention to detail is key - a misplaced full stop can result in a deduction if your marking system really focusses on correct referencing.

The up-side is that correct referencing is easy money. Once you go through the painful manual stage it will become a bit more natural and it can gain you extra percentages. It doesn't come naturally to anyone, so don't worry if you struggle with it for at least the first year and probably longer. It's just a matter of following the rules until you start to remember them (which is never easy with a new discipline). But I certainly found that it was worth the sweat early on.
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dean01234
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If you are using google scholar to find journals etc, I would recommend that you use the cite function of it, it will compile a reference for you in a variety of styles.

Neils toolbox is a good one as well and will be helpful for websites as well as books / journals.

Lastly if you use mainly books from the library, look up an app called RefMe, you just scan the barcode of the book and it will make a reference for you in your chosen style.
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KJane
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In my three years of Uni I felt like I never got referencing perfect. Especially when different tutors accepted one thing and others didn't.

Just practice, and keep practicing.
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x-Venezia-x
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Hi. I know how you feel, referencing is time consuming but very crucial for grades and to avoid plagiarising which is taken very seriously at universities. I have got a book called 'Cite Them Right' its on Amazon and it tells you how to reference everything from websites, journals, PDF, lectures, etc.

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bibliboo
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Thanks guys I've been finding it very time consuming, as some assignments require about 5 different sources, so sometimes I'm using notes I've written from class, then looking them up in a book to reference them. Takes some getting used to.

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Klix88
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That's the problem with using lecture notes to write from - they aren't a primary source. They also won't contain everything you need to answer a question.

In order to write assignments, the idea is that you go away and read books/journals to put your answer together. That way, you gather the references as you go along.

I was gobsmacked when I found out that some of my colleagues were writing an essay and then trying to reference it afterwards. It must take hours. And beware that you'll be expected to use more and more referenced sources as you progress. If you start working the other way round (read then write, as opposed to write then read), the referencing will be much easier and you'll have a much better piece of work.
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Ftmshk
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Start a references page when you start reading for your assignment. Add in all the details of any book, article etc that you might use in the essay as you read them. When you come to write the essay you will have the correct details to hand on your references page. Remember to delete any that you do not use in your essay. That's what I did anyway!


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MkGuy
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www.citethisforme.com

a handy tool. helps you build your reference list as you do your assignments. I found it handy to use when I did my access course last year, and still use it at times now for uni.
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Maura Kat
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(Original post by bibliboo)
One thing that's different on this access course to when I did my A levels 11 years ago is that you now have to reference everything. Back then I only had to do a bibliography at the end of an assignment, but this takes a bit of getting used to doesn't it? Any tips on this?

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i always use this site with much success.

http://referencing.port.ac.uk/
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samjones2be
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I used neils tool box in the beginning and helped loads

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samba
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(Original post by Klix88)
That's the problem with using lecture notes to write from - they aren't a primary source. They also won't contain everything you need to answer a question.

In order to write assignments, the idea is that you go away and read books/journals to put your answer together. That way, you gather the references as you go along.

I was gobsmacked when I found out that some of my colleagues were writing an essay and then trying to reference it afterwards. It must take hours. And beware that you'll be expected to use more and more referenced sources as you progress. If you start working the other way round (read then write, as opposed to write then read), the referencing will be much easier and you'll have a much better piece of work.
So you reference inline as you write? This seems a much smarter way to do things, but what about when you're just writing and can't recall where you got that bit of info from?

I've just done an essay with 40 odd sources, and now have to add the references images and charts :/
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Klix88
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(Original post by samba)
So you reference inline as you write?
Yep. I make rough notes first as I read, and make sure that these contain all of the info I need to reference when I write the assignment later.

This seems a much smarter way to do things, but what about when you're just writing and can't recall where you got that bit of info from?
I wouldn't use anything that I couldn't reference. If I couldn't remember where it came from, there's a risk that it was just something I heard on the news, in a documentary, in a lecture or from the papers, which usually aren't referenceable sources (unless that's what your assignment asks for). You can draw your own conclusions in the final section of the work, but I made a point of never using anything in the main body of an assignment, that I couldn't reference.

If you find yourself in that situation and you're desperate to use the info, it's worth emailing the person who set the assignment and asking them to point you in the right (referencable) direction for the source. If nothing else it shows enthusiasm and that's the sort of thing which comes in handy when a member of staff is writing a job or academic reference for you.

I've just done an essay with 40 odd sources, and now have to add the references images and charts :/
Ouch - I feel your pain. Whilst I got the hang of referencing in the end, I never found an easy way to deal with graphics and the document formatting around them. That was always a tedious slog.
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samba
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(Original post by Klix88)
Yep. I make rough notes first as I read, and make sure that these contain all of the info I need to reference when I write the assignment later.


I wouldn't use anything that I couldn't reference. If I couldn't remember where it came from, there's a risk that it was just something I heard on the news, in a documentary, in a lecture or from the papers, which usually aren't referenceable sources (unless that's what your assignment asks for). You can draw your own conclusions in the final section of the work, but I made a point of never using anything in the main body of an assignment, that I couldn't reference.

If you find yourself in that situation and you're desperate to use the info, it's worth emailing the person who set the assignment and asking them to point you in the right (referencable) direction for the source. If nothing else it shows enthusiasm and that's the sort of thing which comes in handy when a member of staff is writing a job or academic reference for you.


Ouch - I feel your pain. Whilst I got the hang of referencing in the end, I never found an easy way to deal with graphics and the document formatting around them. That was always a tedious slog.
A lot of it is just common sense stuff thoigh , if I'm talking about sovereign debt theory for example its surely a well established concept that doesn't need referenced? Similarly for my own formulas/models and stufg , how would I reference those? (History 1st year BTW)

Do you usually inline chart and image or lump it all at the end? And do you need to reference images, and if so how do you do so? (Chicago)

Finally if I'm describing say traditional historiography, its more a description of research directions than specific info. How would I reference that ?
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Asklepios
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See if your institution gives you access to a reference manager e.g. Endnote


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Klix88
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(Original post by samba)
A lot of it is just common sense stuff thoigh , if I'm talking about sovereign debt theory for example its surely a well established concept that doesn't need referenced?
Yep, sorry, even "everyone knows that" stuff has to be referenced. If you don't reference a statement that you make in your work, it's a tacit claim that you thought of it first which would be plagiarism in your example.

Somebody else must originally have come up with Sovreign Debt Theory - you need to find out who and quote their work, or quote an academic source which explains it. So to introduce it, you could use something from "Sovreign Debt: from Safety to Default" edited by Robert W Kolb (2011). And to give some recent critique of it, you could try "Rethinking Sovreign Debt" by Odette Lienau (2014).

Even if you say something completely non-contentious and self-evident like "It's usually colder in winter in the UK", you'll be expected to be citing something like a Met Office website!

Similarly for my own formulas/models and stufg , how would I reference those? (History 1st year BTW) Do you usually inline chart and image or lump it all at the end? And do you need to reference images, and if so how do you do so? (Chicago)
You need to reference the sources from which you're taking the information on which you're basing your formulas/models.You need to do it for each chart/image. You're not thinking up the data, you're just finding an original way of presenting it. If you're inserting a scanned image, then that can be referenced in the same way as a text statement.

For one of my undergrad assignments, I drew up a graph showing how expenditure by an organisation had increased since 1960. The graph was mine (I couldn't find anyone who'd looked at it in a single one before), but I took the stats from six different sources, each of which had to be referenced in the assignment (short in-text format beneath the graph, with full bibliography entries at the end).

Finally if I'm describing say traditional historiography, its more a description of research directions than specific info. How would I reference that ?
Again, if you're talking about the generic concept of historiography, you can quote from an introductory text which explains it. Something like "Historiography: An Introduction" (2007) edited by Roger Spalding and Christopher Parker (preferably something more recent, but you get the idea).
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samba
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(Original post by Klix88)
Yep, sorry, even "everyone knows that" stuff has to be referenced. If you don't reference a statement that you make in your work, it's a tacit claim that you thought of it first which would be plagiarism in your example.

Somebody else must originally have come up with Sovreign Debt Theory - you need to find out who and quote their work, or quote an academic source which explains it. So to introduce it, you could use something from "Sovreign Debt: from Safety to Default" edited by Robert W Kolb (2011). And to give some recent critique of it, you could try "Rethinking Sovreign Debt" by Odette Lienau (2014).

Even if you say something completely non-contentious and self-evident like "It's usually colder in winter in the UK", you'll be expected to be citing something like a Met Office website!


You need to reference the sources from which you're taking the information on which you're basing your formulas/models.You need to do it for each chart/image. You're not thinking up the data, you're just finding an original way of presenting it. If you're inserting a scanned image, then that can be referenced in the same way as a text statement.

For one of my undergrad assignments, I drew up a graph showing how expenditure by an organisation had increased since 1960. The graph was mine (I couldn't find anyone who'd looked at it in a single one before), but I took the stats from six different sources, each of which had to be referenced in the assignment (short in-text format beneath the graph, with full bibliography entries at the end).


Again, if you're talking about the generic concept of historiography, you can quote from an introductory text which explains it. Something like "Historiography: An Introduction" (2007) edited by Roger Spalding and Christopher Parker (preferably something more recent, but you get the idea).
This is really helpful, and really ****ed up I'm screwed!
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Klix88
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(Original post by samba)
This is really helpful, and really ****ed up I'm screwed!
OK, Rule One is don't panic!

This is one of your first uni assignments and it's designed to help you practise things like referencing and gradually get the hang of it. Nobody's going to start disciplinary proceedings because your work isn't properly referenced. However, correct referencing is what you're aiming for, so the closer you get, the more percentages you win.

You're trying to do your best at this stage of your uni career. If uou're running out of time, just do what you can and improve on it in the next assignment.

It will get easier as you get the hang of it, honest.
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