Would you ever sleep with someone from work? Watch

Lord Jon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Pretty much what it says on the tin. Would you sleep with someone from work? Colleague or a client/customer/ whatever kind of people you deal with.

Personally I wouldn't with a colleague. It's not very professional and if things develop and go bandy then it looks really bad and creates a **** feeling in a team.

With a client/whatever- depends what job I'm in at the time. My job now... Maybe. Others...probably not!
0
reply
iheartplums
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
Surely it's worse to sleep with a client than a colleague?

I've never had sex with somebody that I wasn't in a proper relationship with. So no, it's unlikely that I'd sleep with anyone from work, unless I was in a relationship with them.
0
reply
news2me
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by iheartplums)
Surely it's worse to sleep with a client than a colleague?

I've never had sex with somebody that I wasn't in a proper relationship with. So no, it's unlikely that I'd sleep with anyone from work, unless I was in a relationship with them.
Yes this goes for me to, only I still wouldn't be in a relationship with someone I work with..
0
reply
And then...
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
Have slept with multiple colleagues after nights out, would do it again, wouldn't have a relationship with one.
0
reply
Maid Marian
Badges: 20
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
No.
0
reply
ringlet
Badges: 15
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
yeah I have and currently am. Been together 3 months now..can't help where you meet someone.:dontknow:
0
reply
Cinnie
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
It's common for people to meet partners at work - you spend a lot of time together getting to know each other. Me and my boyfriend met at work.
0
reply
Genocidal
Badges: 16
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
Only if it could lead to a promotion.
1
reply
indigobluesss
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
Not in a million years >.>

You need to keep your professional life and personal life seperate.
0
reply
XMaramena
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
Absolutely not. That's a massive NO in my books. Anyone letting a personal relationship with a coworker even get the slightest sniff in the way of their work in my company wouldn't expect to be under my employment for much longer.
0
reply
Rum Ham
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
No. It would be too awkward if things went bad between us and then we had to work together. I'm not good at keeping things back and holding in how I feel so I would like to keep my work life and private life seperate.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Reue
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
Used to work on an activity site where all the staff lived together on-site. There was alot of sleeping around going on.
0
reply
JVD
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
I've slept with people from my school/sixth form (I'M NOT A TEACHER), I'd see little wrong with doing the same with a work colleague
0
reply
Reue
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
(Original post by XMaramena)
wouldn't expect to be under my employment for much longer.
I would love to see you try and justify that in an employment tribunal.

Believe it or not; all employers must make reasonable allowances for employee personal reasons. Feel free to reallocate them, or to raise the points in an improvement plan.. but don't kid yourself that you'd get away with such a hard and unenforceable line.
0
reply
JC.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
Absolutely, I've slept with everyone on the staff at my place of work...

Although, having said that, I am self employed and there's only myself any my other half who run the company so I don't suppose that's really saying a lot is it?
1
reply
askew116
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by Lord Jon)
Pretty much what it says on the tin. Would you sleep with someone from work? Colleague or a client/customer/ whatever kind of people you deal with.

Personally I wouldn't with a colleague. It's not very professional and if things develop and go bandy then it looks really bad and creates a **** feeling in a team.

With a client/whatever- depends what job I'm in at the time. My job now... Maybe. Others...probably not!
I've done both - colleague and client (sort of)

The colleague asked me out first though, and we had a bit of a fling. It was slightly awkward afterwards but we worked in different departments so it wasn't too bad.

The client was in pure innocence tbf. I was on holiday in NYC (I worked for an airline), met this guy in a bar, had a ONS, and it came up that he was a gold-card holder with the airline I worked for. :ashamed2:
0
reply
XMaramena
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
(Original post by Reue)
I would love to see you try and justify that in an employment tribunal.

Believe it or not; all employers must make reasonable allowances for employee personal reasons. Feel free to reallocate them, or to raise the points in an improvement plan.. but don't kid yourself that you'd get away with such a hard and unenforceable line.
If it's apparent that a relationship between coworkers is hindering their performance as employees, then I have every right to either terminate, or if it's nearing the end, decline to renew their contract. There aren't any females in my company so I've not had to deal with the problem before. I give my best for the company and I expect others to do the same. The office is not a living room - if they want to spend time slacking off or arguing, then they can do it elsewhere.

So yes, in their contracts, what I can't do is forbid it from happening. But what I can do is "strongly discourage" it to get the point across if need be.
0
reply
Reue
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
(Original post by XMaramena)
If it's apparent that a relationship between coworkers is hindering their performance as employees, then I have every right to either terminate,
Not true. As long as they're past probation; you have every right to have a performance review.. agree action points.. agree measurables.. wait a relative period of time.. review performance against action points.. raise a cause for concern.. issue 1st warning, issue 2nd warning, issues 1st written warning, issue 2nd written warning. Then perhaps terminate their employment.

Skip all of that and enjoy getting sued. How could you even begin to prove that a measurable drop in performance was solely due to a workplace romance? And what steps did you take to mitigate that before seeking termination?

(Original post by XMaramena)
There aren't any females in my company so I've not had to deal with the problem before.
What has having any females employment got to do with it? Or do you only employ straight men as part of your already shoddy HR practices


(Original post by XMaramena)
I give my best for the company and I expect others to do the same.
And your employees expect (and legally deserve) for their employer to follow a reasonable and legal employment practice.


(Original post by XMaramena)
So yes, in their contracts, what I can't do is forbid it from happening. But what I can do is "strongly discourage" it to get the point across if need be.
No, you cant even strongly discourage it. It's worrying that you employ people and yet seem to have no real idea about the relevant employee protection laws.
2
reply
XMaramena
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 years ago
#19
(Original post by Reue)
Raise a cause for concern.

Or do you only employ straight men as part of your already shoddy HR practices

And your employees expect (and legally deserve) for their employer to follow a reasonable and legal employment practice.

No, you cant even strongly discourage it.

Raise a cause for concern? Yes, that would be a first step - I wouldn't fire them on the spot (not that I even could). But go through 6 or 7 warnings? No.

You're the one bringing sexuality into this, I simply said that there are no women employed by the company - purely because there haven't been any apply who would be suitable.

And yes, actually, I can strongly discourage it, however If you know of the specific article in UK or US employment law which criminalises this, then please share.
0
reply
Reue
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 5 years ago
#20
(Original post by XMaramena)
You're the one bringing sexuality into this, I simply said that there are no women employed by the company - purely because there haven't been any apply who would be suitable.
I wasnt trying to suggest that you ought to employ woman :s Just that you can't claim this situation isnt relevant purely because you dont employ woman at the moment.

(Original post by XMaramena)
And yes, actually, I can strongly discourage it, however If you know of the specific article in UK or US employment law which criminalises this, then please share.
Protected at the highest level by the ECoHR Article 8. Im sure there are plenty of other safeguards from lower courts if you want to research yourself.

Perhaps better to just avoid the potential liability in the first place by respecting your employees and their privacy a bit more?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you get study leave?

Yes- I like it (498)
59.71%
Yes- I don't like it (43)
5.16%
No- I want it (237)
28.42%
No- I don't want it (56)
6.71%

Watched Threads

View All