Year 12 repeat - do i declare my first year 12 grades? Watch

ieva96
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I got really really terrible grades the first time round. I don't even remember now what I got, but all of them were bellow D. I retook year 12 with two different subjects in different school and got ABB.

Do I declare my 1st year grades? I really don't want to, is there any way UCAS would be able to see that I repeated the year if I didn't declare them?

I did have some circumstances which affected my learning during that year but neither my family nor anyone else were aware of them except my doctor. I did not declare them because I pretty much have them under control, and they would put me in the disabled category in UCAS.

Any suggestions?
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ieva96
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bump

anyone who has repeated the year and applied to unis, what did you do??
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PQ
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(Original post by ieva96)
I got really really terrible grades the first time round. I don't even remember now what I got, but all of them were bellow D. I retook year 12 with two different subjects in different school and got ABB.

Do I declare my 1st year grades? I really don't want to, is there any way UCAS would be able to see that I repeated the year if I didn't declare them?

I did have some circumstances which affected my learning during that year but neither my family nor anyone else were aware of them except my doctor. I did not declare them because I pretty much have them under control, and they would put me in the disabled category in UCAS.

Any suggestions?
You MUST declare all certified grades.

That means if your AS results came through with an overall AS grade then you MUST declare it.

If you leave it out then it will be obvious that your education is missing a year - universities take withholding information extremely seriously - much more so than if an applicant had a year where things didn't turn out (especially where there is a reason for this) and so made changes to put that right.

I would suggest speaking to your referee about the problems you had during that year - they'll be able to explain it to your universities briefly and make it clear that you have moved on and those problems aren't likely to recur.

Please PLEASE don't try to withhold information. It is technically a fraudulent application and you risk losing all your offers (or even being chucked off your course) when it comes to light - and the chances of it coming to light are extremely high.
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halamadrid777
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Yes. If you have any extenuating circumstances, get in touch with uni I had some as well. Even I repeated an year due to mitigating circumstances but I didn't appear for any exams. I showed medical certificate and my referee mentioned these in her reference, and I had no problems getting offers from RG unis.
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Cherry82
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(Original post by PQ)
You MUST declare all certified grades.

That means if your AS results came through with an overall AS grade then you MUST declare it.

If you leave it out then it will be obvious that your education is missing a year - universities take withholding information extremely seriously - much more so than if an applicant had a year where things didn't turn out (especially where there is a reason for this) and so made changes to put that right.

I would suggest speaking to your referee about the problems you had during that year - they'll be able to explain it to your universities briefly and make it clear that you have moved on and those problems aren't likely to recur.

Please PLEASE don't try to withhold information. It is technically a fraudulent application and you risk losing all your offers (or even being chucked off your course) when it comes to light - and the chances of it coming to light are extremely high.
What happens if you've failed your first year at AS but then changed subjects and did these new subjects in a year? So it would amount to two years in total. Do you still declare the old AS levels (E/U grades) or put your actual A level qualifications?
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tanyapotter
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(Original post by Cherry82)
What happens if you've failed your first year at AS but then changed subjects and did these new subjects in a year? So it would amount to two years in total. Do you still declare the old AS levels (E/U grades) or put your actual A level qualifications?
How can you do A2s in one year?
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Cherry82
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(Original post by tanyapotter)
How can you do A2s in one year?
A2s are done in one year. Oh do you mean the whole A level? Becoming a private candidate or doing an intensive course. Some colleges allow students to do intensive courses then others just pay exam centres to sit their modules and do their practicals (if science based).
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Cherry82)
What happens if you've failed your first year at AS but then changed subjects and did these new subjects in a year? So it would amount to two years in total. Do you still declare the old AS levels (E/U grades) or put your actual A level qualifications?
You have to declare everything.
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sydneybridge
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You might think 'the Uni won't ever know'. Wrong.

UCAS is sent all results from all the exam boards every year. This means they already have on file what you received in your GCSEs and AS etc. If what you put on your UCAS application doesnt match this, UCAS and the Uni will investigate. They can, and do, cancel applications in this situation as they regard this as deliberate deception, and therefore fraud.

If there are genuine mitigating circumstances (ie. death of a parent or serious personal illness) that explain your poor performance and need to repeat then you should a) ask your referee to explain this in their reference and b) check on each Uni website for any info about how they handle 'extenuating circumstances' - usually you will need to complete an additional form and provide evidence of the circumstances. Btw, 'teaching difficulties' are not mitigating circumstances.
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Cherry82
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Sigh, I'm so confused though.
I had just spoken to someone on here who repeated their first year of year 12 and did not declare their results from AS level that were U grades. The person said that U grades = no UCAS points which I heard was true therefore it is needed to be put down. But I remember hearing also that once your grades are certified, regardless whether it's an U, you have to declare them. I don't understand how many people are getting away with not declaring their U grades if it's viewed as fraud etc. I know this may sound selfish but I would like to see what would happen if I followed them, I mean some of them are now at university.
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thecatwithnohat
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You will need to declare all A-U grades. Not doing so will be considered fraudulent and your university can snatch your place away as easily as they gave it to you.
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Xlxl23
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You need to declare all grades including a U.
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sydneybridge
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Some (ie. lower) Universities sometimes may not be concerned if they later discover a U grade. Other Unis (ie. the competitive ones) will be - because of their attitude to retakes or taking A levels over 3 years, and their attitude to deception.

Because you are not likely to know in advance how each Uni will react to the U grade I would suggest you own up to all your grades on your UCAS application. As far as RG Unis are concerned, totally failed A levels are not a good look unless there is a very convincing explanation, however they will be even less impressed when they discover later that you deliberately lied about it.
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Blackstarr
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(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
You have to declare everything.
Say, I passed maths GCSE the second time, do I have to declare my previous awful grade?

I thought your highest grade counts.
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Blackstarr)
Say, I passed maths GCSE the second time, do I have to declare my previous awful grade?

I thought your highest grade counts.
Your highest grade counts, but also the fact that it took you two goes to get it. You have to declare everything. Universities regard keeping quiet about results as fraud and you sign a declaration that you haven't done so when you send your application off.
http://help.ucas.com/contract12/index.html

If they discover that you have hidden information like this, a university can withdraw your place right up to graduation if they so wish, and they have done so.
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Blackstarr
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(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
Your highest grade counts, but also the fact that it took you two goes to get it. You have to declare everything. Universities regard keeping quiet about results as fraud and you sign a declaration that you haven't done so when you send your application off.
http://help.ucas.com/contract12/index.html

If they discover that you have hidden information like this, a university can withdraw your place right up to graduation if they so wish, and they have done so.
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