UK Police & Justice System Demonstrate Racial Bias. Watch

Truths
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This report demonstrates that the policing and prosecutions of drug possession offences in England and Wales is unduly focussed on black and minority communities. This report looks at racial disparity rates at stop and search, arrest, prosecution and sentencing and clearly demonstrates that the drug laws in the UK are a major driver of the disproportionality that exists in our criminal justice system in relation to the black community.




White Privilege personified:



Wales (2011/12) found that adults from most black and minority
ethnic groups reported much lower rates of ‘last year’ drug use
than their white counterparts (see Figure 1).



And there's a lot more where that came from:

http://www.release.org.uk/publicatio...-drug-offences


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Truths
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I seem to have left out the most juicy part:



Yikes
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Truths
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It's a little quiet in here?

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President Putin
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Wow. You have broken the fourth wall here.
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Snagprophet
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(Original post by Truths)
So 10% of people who use drugs are whites, over half of that equivalent number are blacks?

Are you not noticing that whites make up over 80% of the country yet blacks are accounting for well over half as much as whiles are in this instance?
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Truths
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(Original post by Snagprophet)
So 10% of people who use drugs are whites, over half of that equivalent number are blacks?
yeh no. It obviously says 10.5% of whites do drugs and 5.8% of blacks do drugs. Unless you think the remaining 83.7 is the Asian community? C'mon you must be smarter than that.
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Dandaman1
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I'm going to play devil's advocate here and point out the graphs do not reveal the following factors:

- Quantity and nature of drugs carried.
- Whether the carriers had intent to sell.
- Where the carriers were (anti-drug law enforcement tends to focus on urban areas, which have more concentrated ethnic minority populations).
- Previous criminal history which may have had an impact on sentencing.
- Gang involvement.

I acknowledge that blacks are generally unfairly targeted for drug related crimes, but the data presented aren't very explanatory (for reasons I suggested above), and may overstate the extent of the situation.
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ClickItBack
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
I'm going to play devil's advocate here and point out the graphs do not reveal the following factors:

- Quantity and nature of drugs carried.
- Whether the carriers had intent to sell.
- Where the carriers were (anti-drug law enforcement tends to focus on urban areas, which have more concentrated ethnic minority populations).
- Previous criminal history which may have had an impact on sentencing.
- Gang involvement.

I acknowledge that blacks are generally unfairly targeted for drug related crimes, but the data presented aren't very explanatory (for reasons I suggested above), and may overstate the extent of the situation.
Give this man a medal.
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Rakas21
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I see no racism here, just the police clamping down on drug abuse.

Stop and search more often i say.
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Truths
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
I'm going to play devil's advocate here and point out the graphs do not reveal the following factors:

- Quantity and nature of drugs carried.
Do you have reason to believe that there is correlation between quantity/nature of drugs and race that can account for the disparities? And it definitely does not negate from the fact they are stopped and searched at higher rates. But here's a little insight into the nature of drugs:
- Across London black people are charged for possession of cannabis at 5 times the rate of white people. For cannabis
warnings the rate is 3 times.
And the OP also addresses cocaine possession.
(Original post by Dandaman1)
- Whether the carriers had intent to sell.
Do you have reason to believe that there is correlation between intent and race that can account for the disparities?
(Original post by Dandaman1)
- Where the carriers were (anti-drug law enforcement tends to focus on urban areas, which have more concentrated ethnic minority populations).
Doesn't seem to matter.
Dorset police reported the highest rates of black / white disproportionality in 2009/10, stopping and
searching black people for drugs at 17.3 times the rate of white
people. In the same year Norfolk police stopped and searched black
people at a rate of 8.6 times the rate of whites.
(Original post by Dandaman1)
- Previous criminal history which may have had an impact on sentencing.
I agree this probably needs exploring. But I'm confident nothin will be discovered.
(Original post by Dandaman1)
- Gang involvement.
Please explain the relevance?
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Dandaman1
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(Original post by Truths)
Do you have reason to believe that there is correlation between quantity/nature of drugs and race that can account for the disparities? And it definitely does not negate from the fact they are stopped and searched at higher rates. But here's a little insight into the nature of drugs:

And the OP also addresses cocaine possession.

Do you have reason to believe that there is correlation between intent and race that can account for the disparities?

Doesn't seem to matter.


I agree this probably needs exploring. But I'm confident nothin will be discovered.

Please explain the relevance?
I'm not saying that black people are carrying more drugs with intent to sell; I'm saying it's a possibility that the data don't describe.

These regions do have urban areas and crime hotspots though, don't they? Do you have region-specific data showing drug carry and drug sale patterns, race-related criminal activity, racial geography, resistance to arrest by racial group, poverty by racial group, etc. that could help us link all this together? (i.e. more detailed, descriptive data that my show us a why instead of a general overview of race by arrest and conviction). And remember that the smaller the black population is in each region, and the more concentrated black communities are around criminal hotspots, the more vulnerable they can be to statistical over-representation.

Drug use and drug dealing in particular are associated with gang activity and gang culture. Law enforcement tends to be more active in searching gang members or suspected gang members (who are disproportionally black) and come down harder on them when evidence is found.

The data you have are suggestive, but not entirely descriptive. This is the crux of what I'm saying. A host of other factors affect searches and sentencing; not just judicial or police racism. Again, I'm not denying that blacks are given unfairly disproportionate attention, but you need to be more critical and less presumptuous when looking at the findings.
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Alfissti
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I think it is good, all blacks, muslims and lower classes should be stopped more often and searched and thoroughly searched. They shouldn't be allowed access to a solicitor unless they could pay for one if there is even a minute evidence against them.
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Truths
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(Original post by Dandaman1)
I'm not saying that black people are carrying more drugs with intent to sell; I'm saying it's a possibility that the data don't describe.

These regions do have urban areas and crime hotspots though, don't they? Do you have region-specific data showing drug carry and drug sale patterns, race-related criminal activity, racial geography, resistance to arrest by racial group, poverty by racial group, etc. that could help us link all this together? (i.e. more detailed, descriptive data that my show us a why instead of a general overview of race by arrest and conviction). And remember that the smaller the black population is in each region, and the more concentrated black communities are around criminal hotspots, the more vulnerable they can be to statistical over-representation.
How do you determine what is what is not "criminal hotspot"? How do you go about drawing those district borders? Sounds like a flawed theory to me.

(Original post by Dandaman1)
Drug use and drug dealing in particular are associated with gang activity and gang culture. Law enforcement tends to be more active in searching gang members or suspected gang members (who are disproportionally black) and come down harder on them when evidence is found.
I seriously detest this notion. The reason that had drawn me to this study was after realizing that the vast majority of students in my school who used drugs were white, yet they don't face the same prejudice. And they certainly were not in gangs. Drug dealing relating to gang activity? Yes, drug use? Hell no. The only time someone assumes a drug user is in a gang is when they are black, that in itself is alarming. And reflecting on how abysmal stop and search success rates are to begin with, how many gangsters or drug dealers are really going to have a heavy impact on the disparities?

(Original post by Dandaman1)
he data you have are suggestive, but not entirely descriptive. This is the crux of what I'm saying. A host of other factors affect searches and sentencing; not just judicial or police racism. Again, I'm not denying that blacks are given unfairly disproportionate attention, but you need to be more critical and less presumptuous when looking at the findings.
As are pretty much all social studies. But I can't say it negates from the claim of racial bias since pretty much all statistics point in that direction.
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Dandaman1
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(Original post by Truths)
How do you determine what is what is not "criminal hotspot"? How do you go about drawing those district borders? Sounds like a flawed theory to me.



I seriously detest this notion. The reason that had drawn me to this study was after realizing that the vast majority of students in my school who used drugs were white, yet they don't face the same prejudice. And they certainly were not in gangs. Drug dealing relating to gang activity? Yes, drug use? Hell no. The only time someone assumes a drug user is in a gang is when they are black, that in itself is alarming. And reflecting on how abysmal stop and search success rates are to begin with, how many gangsters or drug dealers are really going to have a heavy impact on the disparities?



As are pretty much all social studies. But I can't say it negates from the claim of racial bias since pretty much all statistics point in that direction.
A crime hotspot is an area where reported criminal activity is most concentrated - usually urban or suburban neighbourhoods with higher poverty rates. They usually receive more police attention for this reason.

Police put more effort into targeting potential dealers than simply potential users (which could be almost anybody, usually in their own homes). And, for the aforementioned reasons, police will focus on particular environments. Blacks are most concentrated in poorer neighbourhoods with higher rates of gang activity and petty crime per capita, therefore racial stop and search/arrest statistics can become distorted due to this.

Again, I'm not denying that blacks are unfavourably stereotyped, but there can be reasons for this other than pure racism. If blacks were more affluent and lived in more rural, less crime-saturated communities as a whole, police would likely treat them differently. Unfortunately, however, an association is made when a police officer sees a group of black youths (especially if dressing and acting a certain way), and they receive more attention than they may deserve.
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