xhazella
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So I've just got through my first half term of AS Spanish AQA and I'm reflecting on what I have learnt over half term. I'm finding the jump from GCSE to A level ridiculously hard despite classing myself as a 'languages person' (I did German and Spanish at GCSE, getting A* in both).
I'm such a stresser and so I'm already worried about the oral exam and the writing and listening at the end of this year, so I was wondering if anyone who has previously studied/ is studying Spanish A level has any tips for revision or preparation for the exams.
Do I write out phrases and learn them by heart? Do I learn vocab? Do I learn subjunctive phrases applicable to pretty much any question?? Should I be writing and learning model answers now??? I'm just worried it will get to May and I won't be ready, so any advice would be greatly appreciated!
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Nymthae
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(Original post by xhazella)
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I found the step up was massive, so don't worry, it's not uncommon. I felt things start to click into play sometime after Christmas, towards February perhaps.

The oral exam was the easiest part really in the end. Lots of people panic about it, but it will come more naturally as you go along. Do you have a language speaking assistant/speaking 1on1 sessions? If so, just make the most of those. I learnt a couple of complex grammar phrases, to make sure I definitely put them in there, but the commonly used tenses were not worth memorising. It has to be natural and flow like a conversation, and you may get asked a question expanding on something you said/related to, so you do need to treat it like a conversation, and not a scripted piece like GCSE.

I would learn vocabulary now as you're going along. Set yourself some words every week. The textbook might have a glossary of all the words used in the book/across AS, so that would serve as a good list. Your teacher might have a similar resource if the book doesn't, and at worst, use online resources/dictionaries/words you think are useful to know. Vocab will make the reading task much easier as well.

If you have a set of example questions or guide questions for your oral sessions then I used to write out answers to them, to practice the writing. I didn't memorise the answers or anything, but it did mean I had thought about my opinions and flow of what I was saying, so I could draw on it during spoken sessions. If not, i'm sure you can find old exam tasks, or just make up a scenario, because writing is all the same.

No idea about listening really, I always found it hard. I used to listen to a lot of Spanish music, which definitely helped me overall, but can't remember if it did much for my listening competence. I did watch a few films and stuff, so anything like that I believe can be useful.
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A_kris
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I do A level French and Spanish and i'm finding the jump especially difficult in Spanish. My teacher talks mostly in Spanish and is from Spain so speaks very fast. I'm hoping it will get easier; so don't worry you're not the only one who's finding the jump from GCSE difficult!
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KA1995
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I did AS Spanish (2 years ago!), I was worried about the speaking but in the end it was the easiest part, just make sure you take all the opportunities you can to converse with your teacher/aid in Spanish. Basically the more you speak it/read it, the more comfortable you will become.
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xhazella
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Thanks guys, I really hope I get the hang of it, only I'm still not comfortable now with the exam and I'm starting to worry a bit...
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Tarte Tatin
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I'm not doing Spanish, but I'm doing AS French. I'd recommend you do what you said - learn vocab, phrases and try practice questions. What I've personally found helpful is reading the news in French, reading books in French, listening to music, watching films and watching YouTube videos. As well as expanding my vocabulary, it's helped me get better at listening, because I agree, it is hard to work out what someone is saying when they speak fast (my teacher does this too). But honestly, if you listen to the language a lot, you'll begin to pick out more things that people say. Watching films etc also gives you much more motivation, because it's not as dry.
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xhazella
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(Original post by Tarte Tatin)
I'm not doing Spanish, but I'm doing AS French. I'd recommend you do what you said - learn vocab, phrases and try practice questions. What I've personally found helpful is reading the news in French, reading books in French, listening to music, watching films and watching YouTube videos. As well as expanding my vocabulary, it's helped me get better at listening, because I agree, it is hard to work out what someone is saying when they speak fast (my teacher does this too). But honestly, if you listen to the language a lot, you'll begin to pick out more things that people say. Watching films etc also gives you much more motivation, because it's not as dry.

It's so difficult to find motivation to do it because it's not like I can just memorise a set of information and just copy it out in the exam, you actually have to understand.

So in your lessons have you done much exam practise, because I did my first timed exam today (excluding the essay) and I can honestly say I had NO idea what was being said half the time in the listening. Like what kind of things is your teacher telling you to do/ doing to help you prepare?
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Tarte Tatin
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(Original post by xhazella)
It's so difficult to find motivation to do it because it's not like I can just memorise a set of information and just copy it out in the exam, you actually have to understand.

So in your lessons have you done much exam practise, because I did my first timed exam today (excluding the essay) and I can honestly say I had NO idea what was being said half the time in the listening. Like what kind of things is your teacher telling you to do/ doing to help you prepare?
We've only done one timed practice exam, but we regularly have quick vocab tests at the start of lessons. We also tend to activities such as listening and reading exercises. I suppose I'm lucky in that there are only 6 people in my class, so our teacher will go around everyone one by one asking them questions.

Don't feel as though you're doing badly just because you struggle at the listening; you'd be surprised at how many people struggle with that. Listening is definitely my weakest point too. But I've found that just practising a lot really helps. Maybe find some children's TV shows in Spanish on YouTube. I've watched numerous episodes of Peppa Pig in French and it really helps because the language is simple and the pronunciation is very clear. Getting the basic rights really helps with the more advanced stuff.
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chuckster111
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Hi,

How are you revising Spanish?

I'm mainly doing vocab now, and trying to master subjunctive, but are you doing things like mind maps for coming up with content?

I'm not really sure what I can do to revise spanish other than what I'm doing now...
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