HRJONES
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Hello,

I have had a year out and have completely forgot everything about statistics.......... Please help.

I'm measuring eating attitude and its relationship with cognitive style (CS). I will be using 1 questionnaire for CS which will measure to aspects of CS and 2 assessments for CS which will measure two aspects of CS.
I'm guessing the IV is the eating attitudes score and DV is CS score (3 different scores though...) does that mean the study has several levels??? please helppppppppp



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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by HRJONES)
Hello,

I have had a year out and have completely forgot everything about statistics.......... Please help.

I'm measuring eating attitude and its relationship with cognitive style (CS). I will be using 1 questionnaire for CS which will measure to aspects of CS and 2 assessments for CS which will measure two aspects of CS.
I'm guessing the IV is the eating attitudes score and DV is CS score (3 different scores though...) does that mean the study has several levels??? please helppppppppp



Im not sure what you mean by difference levels of a study (there is something called multilevel modelling but that way beyond this level of statistics).

If i get you right, you have one variable for eating attitude, and two variables for cognitive style. The first is the independant and the latter is the dependant (remember the DV is dependant on the IV). I wouldn't say the study has different "levels" though, thats something else.

From what i know, there is no special word to describe a study with multiple IVs and DVs (nearly all studies have more than two).
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Moment 4 Life
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(Original post by iammichealjackson)
Im not sure what you mean by difference levels of a study (there is something called multilevel modelling but that way beyond this level of statistics).

If i get you right, you have one variable for eating attitude, and two variables for cognitive style. The first is the independant and the latter is the dependant (remember the DV is dependant on the IV). I wouldn't say the study has different "levels" though, thats something else.

From what i know, there is no special word to describe a study with multiple IVs and DVs (nearly all studies have more than two).
an IV can hav different levels, as it's what the main one is broken down into. E.g, writing instrument could be the IV, but then a pen/pencil/felt-tip all count as different levels, hence, the OP is right
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by Moment 4 Life)
an IV can hav different levels, as it's what the main one is broken down into. E.g, writing instrument could be the IV, but then a pen/pencil/felt-tip all count as different levels, hence, the OP is right
Oh maybe, i just a had a google :P, its the sort of thing you get taught at A Level i guess and forget by the time your a post grad ...

... although interestingly a "level" in the computer program SPSS refers to whether a variable is nominal, ordinal or continious, and in R it refers to any of the groups in a categorical variable (like what you said; but could also be the dependant variable). However when you say a level i think most people would think of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multilevel_model ... but thats just me.
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Moment 4 Life
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(Original post by iammichealjackson)
Oh maybe, i just a had a google :P, its the sort of thing you get taught at A Level i guess and forget by the time your a post grad ...

... although interestingly a "level" in the computer program SPSS refers to whether a variable is nominal, ordinal or continious, and in R it refers to any of the groups in a categorical variable (like what you said; but could also be the dependant variable). However when you say a level i think most people would think of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multilevel_model ... but thats just me.
I'm just going on what I've been told by my tutors and lecturers. I'm a 2nd year undergrad. I didn't get taught that at A-level. I think you can input it on SPSS but I can't remember how, might have something to do with labels. I've actually never heard of the multilevel model. Maybe both ways are correct, just different interpretations.
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by Moment 4 Life)
I'm just going on what I've been told by my tutors and lecturers. I'm a 2nd year undergrad. I didn't get taught that at A-level. I think you can input it on SPSS but I can't remember how, might have something to do with labels. I've actually never heard of the multilevel model. Maybe both ways are correct, just different interpretations.
Yeh its one of those things. I think most people would just use the word "group" if your talking about levels in a categorical variable though, since its clearer :P
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