violetvictorious
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I'm trying to start revising early on (this half term) so that I'm not cramming in June. But I basically don't know how I'm going to memorise everything. how do I memorise like 50 case studies/experiments? and also, prevent myself getting confused with which case studies support which theory?

Much appreciated.


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aaron133
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Hey, when I was revising for my psychology exams last year I found it helpful to summarise everything in one topic down to a side of A4.

For studies, I found it helpful to pick out key info a squeeze it all into a sentence.

e.g.
Peterson and Peterson's study of duration in short-term memory: They conducted an experiment where 24 participants were asked to recall trigrams at different intervals, during which the participants were instructed to count backwards in 3s to prevent rehersal, the intervals of time ranging from 3-18 seconds. They found that info decays quickly when rehersal is prevented - after 3 seconds 80% recalled the trigrams and after 18 seconds 10% recalled the trigrams. On average the duration was 20secs.

Shortened: Peterson + Peterson (STM Duration): trigrams Ps count backwards. 3 secs 80% 18secs 10%. info decay

Do the same for the evaluation.

After you have done this for a topic print off as many past papers you can and do every single question there is on that topic.

I got an A at AS, so this technique definitely helped me! If you're struggling with it at AS I wouldn't recommend doing it at A2, its a lot harder!

Hope this helps!
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JustAStudent14
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(Original post by violetvictorious)
I'm trying to start revising early on (this half term) so that I'm not cramming in June. But I basically don't know how I'm going to memorise everything. how do I memorise like 50 case studies/experiments? and also, prevent myself getting confused with which case studies support which theory?

Much appreciated.


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First things first DON'T try to memorize all of those case studies believe me you won't need them. Are you doing AQA A because I'd recommend Crash Course and Miss Maduka on Youtube although they haven't covered everything it's got some of Stress, Abnormality (individual differences), child development and social influence done (which pretty much is most of it I know).
Also seeing as you're starting early you can try making songs or mind maps for the case studies.
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violetvictorious
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(Original post by aaron133)
Hey, when I was revising for my psychology exams last year I found it helpful to summarise everything in one topic down to a side of A4.

For studies, I found it helpful to pick out key info a squeeze it all into a sentence.

e.g.
Peterson and Peterson's study of duration in short-term memory: They conducted an experiment where 24 participants were asked to recall trigrams at different intervals, during which the participants were instructed to count backwards in 3s to prevent rehersal, the intervals of time ranging from 3-18 seconds. They found that info decays quickly when rehersal is prevented - after 3 seconds 80% recalled the trigrams and after 18 seconds 10% recalled the trigrams. On average the duration was 20secs.

Shortened: Peterson + Peterson (STM Duration): trigrams Ps count backwards. 3 secs 80% 18secs 10%. info decay

Do the same for the evaluation.

After you have done this for a topic print off as many past papers you can and do every single question there is on that topic.

I got an A at AS, so this technique definitely helped me! If you're struggling with it at AS I wouldn't recommend doing it at A2, its a lot harder!

Hope this helps!
That seems like a good technique; I'll try that. Thankyou!
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violetvictorious
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(Original post by JustAStudent14)
First things first DON'T try to memorize all of those case studies believe me you won't need them. Are you doing AQA A because I'd recommend Crash Course and Miss Maduka on Youtube although they haven't covered everything it's got some of Stress, Abnormality (individual differences), child development and social influence done (which pretty much is most of it I know).
Also seeing as you're starting early you can try making songs or mind maps for the case studies.
Ooh thanks, I'll have a look at those. And yes I'm doing AQA A
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JustAStudent14
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(Original post by violetvictorious)
Ooh thanks, I'll have a look at those. And yes I'm doing AQA A
No problem and yeah basically theres like 1 million things on youtube and don't forget past papers, they usually repeat the same things over and over again.
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TammyIce
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Hey, I know you posted a little while ago, but I thought I could still be of use

I studied AS Psych (AQA A ) last year and got an A Like the previous poster, I found condensing studies helped. As much as you can't remember all of the studies, having a good breadth will put you in good stead. For me consistently mind - mapping a topic in revision, and then marking it helped, focussing on: quality of A01 (outline), quality of A02 (evaluation), accuracy of your recall of the studies, and linking the studies back to the question.

I'd then follow that up with an exam question, just to solidify my knowledge.


Also: don't rely on past papers, last year they revamped the questions basically - and the people who knew the papers but not the content failed (not to scare you, just don't rely on them)

Also, I wrote a series of books for the exams, if you're interested. It's kind of a midway between the revision guide and the textbook, as I personally found it hard to work from either at AS. All five books are there, and present the information in a concise and clear way (If I don't say so myself
If you want more info or just help in general, feel free to PM me ^^
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kindle-Store...Tamara%20Isted
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NineTailedFox
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(Original post by aaron133)
Hey, when I was revising for my psychology exams last year I found it helpful to summarise everything in one topic down to a side of A4.

For studies, I found it helpful to pick out key info a squeeze it all into a sentence.

e.g.
Peterson and Peterson's study of duration in short-term memory: They conducted an experiment where 24 participants were asked to recall trigrams at different intervals, during which the participants were instructed to count backwards in 3s to prevent rehersal, the intervals of time ranging from 3-18 seconds. They found that info decays quickly when rehersal is prevented - after 3 seconds 80% recalled the trigrams and after 18 seconds 10% recalled the trigrams. On average the duration was 20secs.

Shortened: Peterson + Peterson (STM Duration): trigrams Ps count backwards. 3 secs 80% 18secs 10%. info decay

Do the same for the evaluation.

Hope this helps!
This is what I did and it really helps. I also ended up with an A at AS.
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violetvictorious
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(Original post by TammyIce)
Hey, I know you posted a little while ago, but I thought I could still be of use

I studied AS Psych (AQA A ) last year and got an A Like the previous poster, I found condensing studies helped. As much as you can't remember all of the studies, having a good breadth will put you in good stead. For me consistently mind - mapping a topic in revision, and then marking it helped, focussing on: quality of A01 (outline), quality of A02 (evaluation), accuracy of your recall of the studies, and linking the studies back to the question.

I'd then follow that up with an exam question, just to solidify my knowledge.


Also: don't rely on past papers, last year they revamped the questions basically - and the people who knew the papers but not the content failed (not to scare you, just don't rely on them)

Also, I wrote a series of books for the exams, if you're interested. It's kind of a midway between the revision guide and the textbook, as I personally found it hard to work from either at AS. All five books are there, and present the information in a concise and clear way (If I don't say so myself
If you want more info or just help in general, feel free to PM me ^^
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kindle-Store...Tamara%20Isted
Thanks so much




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