Do you hate Americans?

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Made in the USA
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#2661
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#2661
(Original post by Spig)
even if you are American i reckon you can still have a problem with the way the country is run....i don't hate Americans i just find their manner is slightly different to ours(if i can generalise)the ones i've met have seemed pretty brash....really direct with their opinions and overly ambitious.i think that English people are pretty scathing about Americans because they expect to have some similarity with them (what with the language thing) and it's odd when you find this isn't always the case.it's interesting how Americans view the English much more favourably...
Are we really that different though? If the cultures were really that different, English people wouldn't enjoy our TV and movies.

As for the national anglophilia....I have no idea why Americans admire England, its people, and its culture so much.
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Mustard-man
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#2662
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#2662
i hate their government
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Spig
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#2663
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#2663
(Original post by Made in the USA)
Are we really that different though? If the cultures were really that different, English people wouldn't enjoy our TV and movies.

As for the national anglophilia....I have no idea why Americans admire England, its people, and its culture so much.
you seem to think there are some differences because you say Americans admire our culture implying that the English's culture is different.i don't think we are majorly different...we are becoming more alike.i just think there are some differences which can cause problems.i found it funny the other day when i was chatting to this American guy and every 5 mins we were like 'what does that mean?'it was weird since essentially we were speaking the same language.he also had a real problem with my sarcasm...he either didn't get it or thought i was the rudest person on earth!im not saying he's a typical American, it was just an example.
why do you have no idea why Americans like our culture?i have a theory on it but i think you'll find it offensive..anyway,i think it's because some American's feel a bit 'cultureless' whereas in England, we still have our black taxis red buses and stuff-we kept a bit of our heritage as time passed...although this is getting eroded -i don't like how more and more english people say american phrases like '24..7' and stuf.it feels weird to me .kind of like if an American saying mate all the time.

one thing i will say though( and i heard Jerry Springer of all people saying this! )is that there are greater cultural differences between the rich and poor in England and America than there are between our races as a whole...what i mean is there's little cultural similarity between a posh fox hunting Englishmen and some English kid without much money who's kind of into the 'chav' culture.
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Scheherazade
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#2664
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#2664
(Original post by Made in the USA)
As for the national anglophilia....I have no idea why Americans admire England, its people, and its culture so much.
That's not nice. I like these strange people.
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naivesincerity
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#2665
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#2665
(Original post by Made in the USA)
Are we really that different though? If the cultures were really that different, English people wouldn't enjoy our TV and movies.

As for the national anglophilia....I have no idea why Americans admire England, its people, and its culture so much.
I didn't think they did..... :confused: I think we are very different, in terms of attitude and humour.
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naivesincerity
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#2666
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#2666
(Original post by Spig)
don't like how more and more english people say american phrases like '24..7' and stuf.
I agree. Don't get me wrong, i've got nothing against how Americans use the language, that's their culture, but it really grates on me when British people use American phrases like 'kick back', 'chill' and 'guys' - or use that 'L' for loser sign. It makes me want to punch them. Tony Blair saying 'period' also springs to mind. Yuck. Shakespeare would be turning in his grave at the thought of English people *******ising the language in this irksome way.
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Bismarck
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#2667
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#2667
(Original post by naivesincerity)
I agree. Don't get me wrong, i've got nothing against how Americans use the language, that's their culture, but it really grates on me when British people use American phrases like 'kick back', 'chill' and 'guys' - or use that 'L' for loser sign. It makes me want to punch them. Tony Blair saying 'period' also springs to mind. Yuck. Shakespeare would be turning in his grave at the thought of English people *******ising the language in this irksome way.
This nationalist nonsense coming from a supposed socialist is ludicrous. Who the hell cares how people speak? Are you so obtuse that you care more about form than substance? Apparently multiculturalism is good, but as soon as your people start adopting some aspects of other cultures, the world is coming to an end and the government should line them up and shoot them.
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shady lane
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#2668
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#2668
(Original post by naivesincerity)
I agree. Don't get me wrong, i've got nothing against how Americans use the language, that's their culture, but it really grates on me when British people use American phrases like 'kick back', 'chill' and 'guys' - or use that 'L' for loser sign. It makes me want to punch them. Tony Blair saying 'period' also springs to mind. Yuck. Shakespeare would be turning in his grave at the thought of English people *******ising the language in this irksome way.
Well then I'd expect your posts to be in Shakespearean English from now on.
It's a different dialect of English, we are free to speak it how we want. When Webster wrote the first American English dictionary, he purposely made those changes--colour to color, paediatric to pediatric--in an attempt to make English stand on its own as a language and shed the traces of Latin and French influence. I think that was a pretty cool idea and has helped generations of children in spelling I'm sure.

Anyway, as an American who lived in the UK for 6 months, a lot of people either love it or hate it. Many have them have never been, or maybe they've been to NYC or something. I really love London and want to move there actually, but I did realize that Americans are infinitely friendlier than the Brits on average. When you go to Sainsbury's and ask for help bagging, the people look at you as if they were personally offended. In the US customer service is much more important. The Welsh were friendlier than the English (sorry!).
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shady lane
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#2669
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#2669
(Original post by drago di giada)
Most people here who call you 'sir' have either served in the military or are currently serving in it.. We have little respect here.. but then again, most people don't.
Are you from West New York, NJ? I'm from Jersey...
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naivesincerity
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#2670
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#2670
(Original post by NakedNinja123)
Is it because we are the land of opportunity where no matter what race, religion, or even sex you are you can be successful?
It always mystifies me that many American's seem to think that there's less social mobility in other countries, and more discrimination. America has just as much of a class system as Australia or Europe, and i'd guess just as many problems with race relations and discrimination.
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naivesincerity
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#2671
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#2671
(Original post by shady lane)
Well then I'd expect your posts to be in Shakespearean English from now on.
It's a different dialect of English, we are free to speak it how we want. .
Did you read my post?-that's precisley what i said(assuming you are American, which you told me you were). I was referring to Brits using American terminology.
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Bismarck
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#2672
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#2672
(Original post by naivesincerity)
It always mystifies me that many American's seem to think that there's less social mobility in other countries, and more discrimination. America has just as much of a class system as Australia or Europe, and i'd guess just as many problems with race relations and discrimination.
Class does not exist in the US, and anyone who's been there would realize that pretty quickly.
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naivesincerity
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#2673
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#2673
(Original post by Bismarck)
This nationalist nonsense coming from a supposed socialist is ludicrous. Who the hell cares how people speak? Are you so obtuse that you care more about form than substance? Apparently multiculturalism is good, but as soon as your people start adopting some aspects of other cultures, the world is coming to an end and the government should line them up and shoot them.
Would you like it if everyone in your city started saying things like 'tally ho chaps, what a spiffing day'?.If nationalistic means wanting to have a national identity and culture distinct from America, then i guess i am. Is it such a sin?
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naivesincerity
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#2674
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#2674
(Original post by Bismarck)
Class does not exist in the US, and anyone who's been there would realize that pretty quickly.
When i say class, i mean a person's oppurtunity being influenced by financial backing.
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Bismarck
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#2675
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#2675
(Original post by naivesincerity)
Would you like it if everyone in your city started saying things like 'tally ho chaps, what a spiffing day'?.
I wouldn't give a damn. Why should I care how people speak as long as I could understand them? Why don't you speak Old English or at least Middle English? Too lazy?

If nationalistic means wnating have a national identity and culture distinct from America, then i guess i am. Is it such a sin?
It makes you a national socialist. I'm sure you're delighted with that title.

(Original post by naivesincerity)
When i say class, i mean a person's oppurtunity being influenced by financial backing.
There is no healthy person in the US who cannot make it to the top of the business and/or political world if they put in enough effort.
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naivesincerity
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#2676
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#2676
(Original post by Bismarck)
.

There is no healthy person in the US who cannot make it to the top of the business and/or political world if they put in enough effort.
Fair enough, i accept that, but i was referring to the belief in some Americans that that is MORE possible than in say, Europe or Australia. I don't see any evidence for that.
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Bismarck
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#2677
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#2677
(Original post by naivesincerity)
Fair enough, i accept that, but i was referring to the belief in some Americans that that is MORE possible than in say, Europe or Australia. I don't see any evidence for that.
Considering that there are billionaires in Europe, and considering that the highest pay a hard-working and talented individual can expect to get paid is rather low (especially when taxes are included in the equation), it becomes obvious that it is extremely difficult for Europeans to amass a large fortune within one generation. This does not apply to the US.
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naivesincerity
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#2678
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#2678
(Original post by Bismarck)
It makes you a national socialist. I'm sure you're delighted with that title.
So you imply here that i am dispicable for wanting to preserve a culture distinct from Americas....i voted 'no' on the poll, but this kind of attitude makes me question my choice.
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naivesincerity
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#2679
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#2679
(Original post by Bismarck)
Considering that there are billionaires in Europe, and considering that the highest pay a hard-working and talented individual can expect to get paid is rather low (especially when taxes are included in the equation), it becomes obvious that it is extremely difficult for Europeans to amass a large fortune within one generation. This does not apply to the US.
Yes but mobility is surely measured more by the disparity(in either job status or the percentage of people who earn less than you)between a person and their parents, rather than the actual sum they amass?
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Bismarck
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#2680
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#2680
(Original post by naivesincerity)
So you imply here that i am dispicable for wanting to preserve a culture distinct from Americas....i voted 'no' on the poll, but this kind of attitude makes me question my choice.
No you're dispicable for being so petty and for judging people based on how they talk and not what they say.

Yes but mobility is surely measured more by the disparity(in either job status or the percentage of people who earn less than you)between a person and their parents, rather than the actual sum they amass.
Social mobility is the ability of individuals to move up the socioeconomic ladder if they possess the necessary skills and put in the necessary amount of effort. If having the skills and motivation does not allow a person to rise to the top, then social mobility is lacking.
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