Do you hate Americans?

Watch
katiesado
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1881
Report 16 years ago
#1881
(Original post by drago di giada)
"Melting Pot".. think about it.. no matter WHO you talk to.. (maybe with the exception of Native Americans.. depending on how you look at it.. they/we were here first BUT they/we migrated from europe etc. back in the day.) No matter WHO you talk to.. they all have mixed ancestry (most americans anyways).. you ask someone.. "ethnicity?" you get.."russian, german, italian, czech, etc etc..." you very rarely come across an "american" with a set ancestry.. "Italian" and if you notice.. not "american"...

(sorry for the confusing aspect but eh, whatever.. lol.)
yes, you only get "American" if you're abroad but within our own country we don't really think of "Americanness" as a state of mind or as a culture that actually exists. our lack of roots and tradition is confusing to us so we try to attach ourselves to something, our perceived ancestry and "heritage".
0
reply
djchak
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1882
Report 16 years ago
#1882
(Original post by katiesado)
yes, you only get "American" if you're abroad but within our own country we don't really think of "Americanness" as a state of mind or as a culture that actually exists. our lack of roots and tradition is confusing to us so we try to attach ourselves to something, our perceived ancestry and "heritage".
Hmm, I would have to disgree with "our lack of roots and tradition is confusing "

Our traditions and roots are based on american history and ideaolgy, good or bad, and so that defines our culture...while ethnicity plays a part, it does not solely define being an american....

But that said, I agree with some of the ideas in the comment.

Anyway, you can love us or hate us, but "Americans" (citizens of the USA in particular) have a distinct culture, that doesn't fit in to any other culture, and therefore cannot be defined easily....
0
reply
Kew
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#1883
Report 16 years ago
#1883
(Original post by djchak)
Hmm, I would have to disgree with "our lack of roots and tradition is confusing "

Our traditions and roots are based on american history and ideaolgy, good or bad, and so that defines our culture...while ethnicity plays a part, it does not solely define being an american....

But that said, I agree with some of the ideas in the comment.

Anyway, you can love us or hate us, but "Americans" (citizens of the USA in particular) have a distinct culture, that doesn't fit in to any other culture, and therefore cannot be defined easily....
So what does this culture that 'doesn't fit into any other culture' consist of then?
0
reply
drago di giada
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1884
Report 16 years ago
#1884
(Original post by katiesado)
yes, you only get "American" if you're abroad but within our own country we don't really think of "Americanness" as a state of mind or as a culture that actually exists. our lack of roots and tradition is confusing to us so we try to attach ourselves to something, our perceived ancestry and "heritage".
Most likely because america has so many different cultures all in one, we can't find just one and call it the "american culture." So we attach to different ancestries... Italian, German, Irish, etc. Places with established cultures.. fixed.. what have you.
0
reply
alkaeda
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1885
Report 16 years ago
#1885
so do 230 people on here hate all americans?? we might have a problem
0
reply
Vienna
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1886
Report 16 years ago
#1886
(Original post by alkaeda)
so do 230 people on here hate americans?? we might have a problem
yes, its concerning
0
reply
Howard
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1887
Report 16 years ago
#1887
(Original post by vienna95)
yes, its concerning
It's not the statistic that concerns me, more the hypocricy.

I can well imagine a poll asking "Do you hate Indians/Pakistanis/Romanian Gypsies/ etc"? and the reply posts would quickly fill up with the normal bed wetting responses........."How can anyone make such "sweeping generalizations?......there are good and bad ones......blah, blah, blah.....I've just poo'd my pants......etc"

But when it comes to hating Americans these lunatics can hit the "yes" button without any reservation. :rolleyes:
0
reply
Made in the USA
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1888
Report 16 years ago
#1888
(Original post by alkaeda)
so do 230 people on here hate all americans?? we might have a problem
There is a lot of evil in the world and I don't think America is worthy of so much hatred. I think these 230 people need to put things in perspective.
0
reply
Howard
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1889
Report 16 years ago
#1889
(Original post by Made in the USA)
There is a lot of evil in the world and I don't think America is worthy of so much hatred. I think these 230 people need to put things in perspective.
I think they need to seek medical help.
0
reply
drago di giada
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1890
Report 16 years ago
#1890
(Original post by alkaeda)
so do 230 people on here hate all americans?? we might have a problem
Yeah, it's called stupidity.
0
reply
naivesincerity
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1891
Report 16 years ago
#1891
(Original post by vienna95)
yes, its concerning
I think people are taking it a little too seriously...
I dont think you should be that concerned, its probably just a non-serious vote...because USA are hugely influential and powerful, and not seen as "the victim" people feel they can handle a bit of stick, and some people resent SOME of their politicians arrogance in the manner they have dealt with other countries, but i don't think its indicative of any hatred towards individual Americans, its more of just a reflex sport to bash the USA, as it has been with the Americans towards the French
0
reply
Made in the USA
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1892
Report 16 years ago
#1892
(Original post by naivesincerity)
I think people are taking it a little too seriously...
I dont think you should be that concerned, its probably just a non-serious vote...because USA are hugely influential and powerful, and not seen as "the victim" people feel they can handle a bit of stick, and some people resent SOME of their politicians arrogance in the manner they have dealt with other countries , but i don't think its indicative of any hatred towards individual Americans, its more of just a reflex sport to bash the USA, as it has been with the Americans towards the French
I don't think you can resent the US politicians without resenting the majority of the American people that voted for them.
I voted for Bush in November because I support his foreign and most of his domestic policies. If you don't like Bush, wouldn't it make sense to also dislike me, as an individual American, for voting him into power?
0
reply
naivesincerity
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1893
Report 16 years ago
#1893
(Original post by Made in the USA)
I don't think you can resent the US politicians without resenting the majority of the American people that voted for them.
I voted for Bush in November because I support his foreign and most of his domestic policies. If you don't like Bush, wouldn't it make sense to also dislike me, as an individual American, for voting him into power?
I just meant you cannot generalise certain behaviours to every American...whether you can like someone on a personal level when you dislike their political beliefs is another debate for another thread....
0
reply
djchak
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1894
Report 16 years ago
#1894
(Original post by naivesincerity)
I just meant you cannot generalise certain behaviours to every American...whether you can like someone on a personal level when you dislike their political beliefs is another debate for another thread....

Honestly I'm not suprised that 230 people voted this way. I think if we did have a poll among students in the UK, the results would come out the same.

I believe there was similar results in a student poll in Canada, back in Nov. I'll try to find a link for clarification.

Let's face it, outside the US, america bashing is the "hip new thing".

You would have to be pretty bolkd to say you liked something about the US, just out of the blue...
0
reply
naivesincerity
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1895
Report 16 years ago
#1895
(Original post by djchak)
Honestly I'm not suprised that 230 people voted this way. I think if we did have a poll among students in the UK, the results would come out the same.

I believe there was similar results in a student poll in Canada, back in Nov. I'll try to find a link for clarification.

Let's face it, outside the US, america bashing is the "hip new thing".

You would have to be pretty bolkd to say you liked something about the US, just out of the blue...
I like loads of American music...and the films of Martin Scorcese, and Robert De Niro tons of stuff
0
reply
Kondar
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1896
Report 16 years ago
#1896
(Original post by djchak)
Honestly I'm not suprised that 230 people voted this way. I think if we did have a poll among students in the UK, the results would come out the same.

I believe there was similar results in a student poll in Canada, back in Nov. I'll try to find a link for clarification.

Let's face it, outside the US, america bashing is the "hip new thing".

You would have to be pretty bolkd to say you liked something about the US, just out of the blue...
I dont think it is really as bad as that. I have travelled extensivley and most of the America bashing I have seen comes from Western Europe. It is suprising that it is mostly the countries who are doing well who have the biggest axe to grind with us. The overwhelming impression I have received from poorer third world countries is that of respect, awe, and admiration.

I was in siberia once with these 2 british guys (they loved to trash America) the Russians always wanted to talk about America, never England. At one point they even said, "the Beatles, great American rock". The two British guys hated it.

Most everywhere I have been I have kids who want to show me thier knock off Nike's or thier Laker's shirt, talk about Finding Nemo, take me to buy some Coca Cola, or ask if I know Brittney Spears or Eminem. And I have been to several Muslim dominated areas. The only anti-american hostility I have ever encountered has been by white western Europeans.

(Yes, I know there are places where I can get my head chopped off for being American, but those places are far and few between)
0
reply
psychic_satori
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1897
Report 16 years ago
#1897
(Original post by Kondar)
Most everywhere I have been I have kids who want to show me thier knock off Nike's or thier Laker's shirt, talk about Finding Nemo, take me to buy some Coca Cola, or ask if I know Brittney Spears or Eminem. And I have been to several Muslim dominated areas. The only anti-american hostility I have ever encountered has been by white western Europeans.
Of course! I mean, their social circles totally eclipse!
0
reply
SamTheMan
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1898
Report 16 years ago
#1898
(Original post by psychic_satori)
I think the "Canadian" ethnicity is for people who descend from Native American tribes but who do not consider themselves Inuit (They switch it to Canadian to avoid confusion with being a USA American). It's not really a category for your average Joe Canadian.
No, that's not quite what the Canadian ethnicity means. It definitely means people who wish to distinguish themselves from their mixed ethnic heritage and can't be bothered looking back and would rather just consider themselves as Canadian. Just as in the UK, few people care if they descend from Danes or Swedes.

From http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/980217/d980217.htm
As expected, these modifications, in particular the inclusion of "Canadian" as an example, resulted in a major change in the way ethnic origins were reported. As a result, the 1996 Census data on ethnic origin can not be compared meaningfully with data from earlier censuses.

In the 1996 Census, 5.3 million persons, accounting for 19% of the total population, reported their only ethnic origin as "Canadian". An additional 3.5 million persons (12%) reported both Canadian and other origins. In 1991, when "Canadian" was not listed as an example, 3% reported Canadian only and a further 1% reported Canadian in combination with one or more other origins.

These people definitely are not of Inuit/Native descent.


(Original post by psychic_satori)
Actually, most people I've ever encountered are obsessive about all of their little bits of ethnicities. It's an individuality thing. I've never actually heard of anyone who didn't say "Oh, I'm part German, Polish, etc."
Well that's what makes it so bizarre. In the US, people who claim to be Irish or Polish are almost never 100% of Irish or Polish descent. For example, on St Paddy's Day, every American who has at least a Great Great Grandparent who was Irish will claim they're Irish. I remember discussing this with you before. This is due to the fact that origins like Irish, Italian or Polish are easier to determine in the US as they correspond to more recent immigration than say British or German immigration, although in effect, there is more British and German blood flowing among the American population.

I think there's also a cultural factor here: British or German heritage is less celebrated as it reminds Americans of the pre-revolutionary era, and puritanism.
0
reply
psychic_satori
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1899
Report 16 years ago
#1899
(Original post by SamTheMan)
Well that's what makes it so bizarre. In the US, people who claim to be Irish or Polish are almost never 100% of Irish or Polish descent. For example, on St Paddy's Day, every American who has at least a Great Great Grandparent who was Irish will claim they're Irish. I remember discussing this with you before.
"Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day!" Haven't you ever heard that saying?

This is due to the fact that origins like Irish, Italian or Polish are easier to determine in the US as they correspond to more recent immigration than say British or German immigration, although in effect, there is more British and German blood flowing among the American population.
While there may be a greater proportion who have some British or German ancestry, if you consider how far back those ancestors go, and you go by being 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, etc, you would see that the more recent immigrant groups do, in fact, make up the larger proportion of one's bloodline.

I think there's also a cultural factor here: British or German heritage is less celebrated as it reminds Americans of the pre-revolutionary era, and puritanism.
You said that before, and I still disagree.
0
reply
SamTheMan
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1900
Report 16 years ago
#1900
(Original post by psychic_satori)
"Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day!" Haven't you ever heard that saying?
Yep I have!


(Original post by psychic_satori)
While there may be a greater proportion who have some British or German ancestry, if you consider how far back those ancestors go, and you go by being 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, etc, you would see that the more recent immigrant groups do, in fact, make up the larger proportion of one's bloodline.
You're right about the ratios decreasing as you go back in time but as you go back, the number of ancestors increases. In a typical family where the kids have 4 grandparents: one a recent immigrant, and the 3 others "All-Americans". Among those 3 others, if you go back, they're all 1/2 or 1/4 German.
The larger proporition of the population's bloodline isn't recent immigrants actually as the core of the US population was made during the 19th and 20th century. The Germans always had strong waves of immigration.

At the last US census, German was the mostly commonly claimed ethnicity.

(Original post by psychic_satori)
You said that before, and I still disagree.
Well I still find it hard to explain why the number of people claiming British ethnicity has decreased in the last few decades in the US with respect to other European ethnicities(I'm talking with respect to other European ethnicities that are not increasing through immigration either).

As for the German ethnicity, which is the most important ethnic origin in the US, yet people don't go around with "Kiss Me I'm German" t-shirts.

Of course there are many factors that would explain why some ethnic origins are claimed more than others, but clearly, among ethnic origins corresponding to the same immigration phases (say British and Irish in the 19th century, although British immigration was less important than Irish by then), people seem prouder to identify themselves with certain ethnic origins more than others.

Millions of Irish arrived in the US in the 19th century but so did millions of Germans and British at the same time. Yet Americans don't show off their German or British descent the way they flaunt their Irish heritage.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think mandatory Relationships and Sex Education in secondary schools is a good idea?

Yes (300)
84.27%
No (56)
15.73%

Watched Threads

View All