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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    Millions of Irish arrived in the US in the 19th century but so did millions of Germans and British at the same time. Yet Americans don't show off their German or British descent the way they flaunt their Irish heritage.
    Hm..I think the reason that this is is because people who are Irish enjoy showing off their heritage. St. Pattie's day makes it that way. Everyone loves being Irish and drawing up their family trees to wave in people's noses. I'm 1/4. My best friend on the other hand is 1/2 british 1/2 german. She's just not into flauting her history. Also, the majority of Americans are more Irish than British. The only reason I can call myself British is due to the fact that one man married into an Irish family. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by AmericanChick)
    Hm..I think the reason that this is is because people who are Irish enjoy showing off their heritage. St. Pattie's day makes it that way. Everyone loves being Irish and drawing up their family trees to wave in people's noses. I'm 1/4. My best friend on the other hand is 1/2 british 1/2 german. She's just not into flauting her history. Also, the majority of Americans are more Irish than British. The only reason I can call myself British is due to the fact that one man married into an Irish family. :rolleyes:
    Correction. The majority of Americans WANT TO BE more Irish than British. It's more in vogue. The Brits of course had been in the US for over 200 years before Paddy came along. I suspect there are many more Americans who are of English/Scottish/Welsh stock than Irish. But as I say, it's more fashionable to be a Mick.
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    (Original post by AmericanChick)
    Hm..I think the reason that this is is because people who are Irish enjoy showing off their heritage. St. Pattie's day makes it that way. Everyone loves being Irish and drawing up their family trees to wave in people's noses. I'm 1/4. My best friend on the other hand is 1/2 british 1/2 german. She's just not into flauting her history. Also, the majority of Americans are more Irish than British. The only reason I can call myself British is due to the fact that one man married into an Irish family. :rolleyes:
    Yes Howard, that's somewhat what I said...See highlighted. Your probably right. The British were here long before the Irish, but now I think, the British heritage has been so diluted that almsot everyone you talk to who is british is also Irish...
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Correction. The majority of Americans WANT TO BE more Irish than British. It's more in vogue. The Brits of course had been in the US for over 200 years before Paddy came along. I suspect there are many more Americans who are of English/Scottish/Welsh stock than Irish. But as I say, it's more fashionable to be a Mick.
    Exactly. I'm more Irish than most Americans but you don't see me dressing up like a leprachaun and shouting it from the roof tops.

    Even those Americans who are of Irish heritage, for most of them it was so bloodly long ago that Great-Great Grandad Seamus and his wife went over to America that they're no more Irish than they are African.
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    (Original post by LH)
    Exactly. I'm more Irish than most Americans but you don't see me dressing up like a leprachaun and shouting it from the roof tops.

    Even those Americans who are of Irish heritage, for most of them it was so bloodly long ago that Great-Great Grandad Seamus and his wife went over to America that they're no more Irish than they are African.
    How true. My gradad on my mom's side was a kraut which makes me 1/4 kraut myself. But you don't see me living on snitzel and saurkraut or waltzing around in the ridiculous german ledenhose (or however it's spelt) and claiming to be German.
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    (Original post by LH)
    Exactly. I'm more Irish than most Americans but you don't see me dressing up like a leprachaun and shouting it from the roof tops.

    Even those Americans who are of Irish heritage, for most of them it was so bloodly long ago that Great-Great Grandad Seamus and his wife went over to America that they're no more Irish than they are African.
    lol. Some people do like to go a bit over the top...Have you ever been to an Irish pub in the US on St. Pattie's day? It's quite scary... :rolleyes:
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    i'm 1/4 scottish and 1/4 welsh,and half english, which means half of me should hate my other half
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    How do you work out what fraction of you in what nationality?

    Both my mum's parents were Irish but she was born in England. All my Dad's side is English.
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    (Original post by LH)
    How do you work out what fraction of you in what nationality?

    Both my mum's parents were Irish but she was born in England. All my Dad's side is English.
    Easy. You trace your heritage and see what family members were of what nationality. Then it's basic mathematics from there. Mine took a while. I'm a full 1/2 portuguese, 1/4 irish, 1/16 British, 1/16 Scottish, and 1/8 dutch.
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    (Original post by LH)
    How do you work out what fraction of you in what nationality?

    Both my mum's parents were Irish but she was born in England. All my Dad's side is English.
    Is your mother full Irish? If she is, you'd be half brit half irish...
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    (Original post by AmericanChick)
    Is your mother full Irish? If she is, you'd be half brit half irish...
    Well she was born in England so she can't be fully Irish.
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    (Original post by LH)
    Well she was born in England so she can't be fully Irish.
    She was born in England, but you said that both her parents were full Irish didn't you?
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    (Original post by AmericanChick)
    She was born in England, but you said that both her parents were full Irish didn't you?
    Yes - does that make her Irish?
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    (Original post by LH)
    How do you work out what fraction of you in what nationality?

    Both my mum's parents were Irish but she was born in England. All my Dad's side is English.
    Well following bloodlines if your mum's parents were both Irish then she would be Irish regardless of being born in England. So, your Dad would be English, your mum Irish, and you a half-breed!
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    (Original post by AmericanChick)
    Is your mother full Irish? If she is, you'd be half brit half irish...
    Half English and half Irish.....(not half Brit)
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    (Original post by LH)
    Well she was born in England so she can't be fully Irish.
    If a Camel is born in a stable it is still a camel, not a horse.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Half English and half Irish.....(not half Brit)
    Yes, I'm sorry. I know the difference, I just don't realise what i'm typing somtimes...
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    (Original post by LH)
    Yes - does that make her Irish?
    Regardless of where she was born, her entire family is Irish, so that makes her full.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    If a Camel is born in a stable it is still a camel, not a horse.
    Are you comparing my mother to a horse? :p:

    OK, so I'm a mongrel then. I never realised I was half-Irish before - perhaps I'll join the IRA now.
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    (Original post by AmericanChick)
    Easy. You trace your heritage and see what family members were of what nationality. Then it's basic mathematics from there. Mine took a while. I'm a full 1/2 portuguese, 1/4 irish, 1/16 British, 1/16 Scottish, and 1/8 dutch.
    With that combination, you're probably quite fit....
 
 
 
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