Does doing Joint Honours mean twice as much work?

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montezuma36
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I'm thinking about applying for a joint honours degree in English and History but considering these are two typically academic and content heavy subjects, will this mean doing twice as much work?

I'm aware you only do certain modules from each, which work out the same as a single subject, but what about examination? Will joint honours mean doing twice the amount of coursework, or sitting twice as many exams, and for the third year, will it mean having to produce 2 dissertations?
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askew116
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You've answered your own question there.

You will do approximately half the modules from each subject, and will sit exams/submit coursework related to the modules from each subject you take.

Regarding the 3rd year, you will only do 1 dissertation. Which subject it's in will vary by the course and the uni.

That's my understanding of it anyway, I'm single honours myself.
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UniofReading
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(Original post by montezuma36)
I'm thinking about applying for a joint honours degree in English and History but considering these are two typically academic and content heavy subjects, will this mean doing twice as much work?

I'm aware you only do certain modules from each, which work out the same as a single subject, but what about examination? Will joint honours mean doing twice the amount of coursework, or sitting twice as many exams, and for the third year, will it mean having to produce 2 dissertations?
Hello!
I study a joint honours degree in English Literature and History of Art at the University of Reading and am in my third year. I would definitely recommend studying a joint honours degree if you have an interest in both subjects.

A joint honours degree is set up so that each subject and its modules are balanced as much as possible even when it comes to exams. As you are interested in studying a humanities course it may be more likely that modules are a combination of exam and coursework. This is dependent on the module studied.

As the course is balanced equally, this may mean that you might be taking a compulsary module in English but not the one for History or vice versa for example. This is dependent on the course and university so perhaps contact someone directly from the subject department.

My dissertation combines both subjects which is really interesting to do. It can be quite difficult balancing the two and making sure theres enough content for both of the subjects. There is no fixture for this (i.e set amount of words for each subject), I'm just ensuring that when I talk about both subjects they intertwine and flow easily. Some universities may ask you to pick one subject to do your dissertation on, but you won't be asked to do two separate dissertations!

It is balanced well, but there have been times when I feel it is slightly more work as you are applying different skills to each subject and may have to study further into a particular topic/era to gain more of an understanding. Don't worry about this though! You will get more adjusted to studying two different subjects. I think doing a joint honours degree is a great benefit as you gain more skills and knowledge. You will find that both the subjects cross over and you can use whatever you have learnt in one subject to perhaps enhance your understanding of something in the other.

Feel free to ask any questions about anything university related,
Pip, third year English Literature and History of Art :^_^:
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tinyflame
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Hi does anyone know whether doing a psychology joint honours is advisable?

I am afraid that it won't be BPS accredited if I do a joint honours, and I know how important it is for a pschology degree to be accredited to be taken seriously.
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by nsolma1)
Hi does anyone know whether doing a psychology joint honours is advisable?

I am afraid that it won't be BPS accredited if I do a joint honours, and I know how important it is for a pschology degree to be accredited to be taken seriously.
Check below to see whether any particular course is accredited - and yes, it is important if you want to work in the field.

http://www.bps.org.uk/bpslegacy/ac
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tinyflame
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(Original post by ageshallnot)
Check below to see whether any particular course is accredited - and yes, it is important if you want to work in the field.

http://www.bps.org.uk/bpslegacy/ac
Thank you man

Is it also worth it to ask the universities themselves and email them to be sure?
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by nsolma1)
Thank you man

Is it also worth it to ask the universities themselves and email them to be sure?
The websites for each course should tell you whether they are accredited - look there rather than emailing.
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tinyflame
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(Original post by ageshallnot)
The websites for each course should tell you whether they are accredited - look there rather than emailing.
Thanks man
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