:'( Struggling with AS Sociology!!! Watch

Summer Rose
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I dont know how to answer 24 mark essay questions so im failing! Can someone tell me the basic structure of an essay PLEASE? Im doing Families and Households: Demography at the moment, thanks xx
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lauraccc
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The basic structure I used last year (I got 76/80 in the Families and Households unit, and a high A over the whole AS):

- Start by defining any key terms in the question (e.g. "demography", "ageing population"), and applying a theoretical perspective if applicable. If a question mentions exploitation, the proletariat, bourgeoisie, etc. but doesn't overtly reference Marxism, you'll be expected to make that connection yourself, in your introduction. Say something like, "Marxists would argue [the point in the question], but [...]"

- For each of your paragraphs, give a reason/argument/point with evidence to back it up, then criticise it. You can criticise this by saying, "However, feminists/functionalists/Marxists/postmodernists/New Right would instead argue," or giving a methodological criticism, e.g. if your evidence were a study, you could say, "However, this study is outdated, so cannot be applied to today's society [...]"

- So, basically: This is my point, this is the evidence for it, this point can be criticised by saying this. Always refer to the question in your point and criticisms. You can drop whole grades for not referring to the question consistently.

- Refer to theoretical perspectives/named sociologists and add criticisms throughout.

- Write at least three sides.

- Don't introduce new ideas in your conclusion, just summarise the direction your essay followed.

- Don't say "I" in your essays; it's only a small thing, and technically you shouldn't lose marks for doing so, but it makes your writing look less mature so an examiner might look upon it less favourably.

I hope this helps somewhat. If you have any questions, even just about general Sociology, I'd be happy to help.
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Summer Rose
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(Original post by lauraccc)
The basic structure I used last year (I got 76/80 in the Families and Households unit, and a high A over the whole AS):

- Start by defining any key terms in the question (e.g. "demography", "ageing population"), and applying a theoretical perspective if applicable. If a question mentions exploitation, the proletariat, bourgeoisie, etc. but doesn't overtly reference Marxism, you'll be expected to make that connection yourself, in your introduction. Say something like, "Marxists would argue [the point in the question], but [...]"

- For each of your paragraphs, give a reason/argument/point with evidence to back it up, then criticise it. You can criticise this by saying, "However, feminists/functionalists/Marxists/postmodernists/New Right would instead argue," or giving a methodological criticism, e.g. if your evidence were a study, you could say, "However, this study is outdated, so cannot be applied to today's society [...]"

- So, basically: This is my point, this is the evidence for it, this point can be criticised by saying this. Always refer to the question in your point and criticisms. You can drop whole grades for not referring to the question consistently.

- Refer to theoretical perspectives/named sociologists and add criticisms throughout.

- Write at least three sides.

- Don't introduce new ideas in your conclusion, just summarise the direction your essay followed.

- Don't say "I" in your essays; it's only a small thing, and technically you shouldn't lose marks for doing so, but it makes your writing look less mature so an examiner might look upon it less favourably.

I hope this helps somewhat. If you have any questions, even just about general Sociology, I'd be happy to help.
Thank you, this helped quite a lot x
And yes i will make sure to contact you if i need any more help! Thanks again!
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