LSE rejection vs. Oxford Watch

ohdarlin
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I just got a rejection notice from LSE this morning, and now I'm feeling nervous about Oxford. The rejection was based on a 'lack of passion' in the personal statement, which my instructors had told me was really good. My qualifications meet the requirements for Oxford and are excellent compared to others at my school, but I was counting on my statement to make me successful. Now I'm worried because I know Oxford is really looking for passion for the subject (in my case, law).

So how different are Oxford and LSE as far as which applicants they admit? Do I have anything to worry about here or am I just freaking myself out?

I should probably note that I'm great at interviews, so as long as I make it that far, I will be confident overall.
0
reply
Chlorophile
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by ohdarlin)
I just got a rejection notice from LSE this morning, and now I'm feeling nervous about Oxford. The rejection was based on a 'lack of passion' in the personal statement, which my instructors had told me was really good. My qualifications meet the requirements for Oxford and are excellent compared to others at my school, but I was counting on my statement to make me successful. Now I'm worried because I know Oxford is really looking for passion for the subject (in my case, law).

So how different are Oxford and LSE as far as which applicants they admit? Do I have anything to worry about here or am I just freaking myself out?

I should probably note that I'm great at interviews, so as long as I make it that far, I will be confident overall.
I find it hard to believe that LSE would reject you purely on the basis of the personal statement since most top universities don't really seem to care much about it. Certainly, a personal statement won't "make you successful" when applying to top universities. Oxford definitely doesn't place a lot of weight on the personal statement so if your grades are excellent and you impress at interview (it's probably worth stressing at this point that Oxford's interview isn't so much an interview as a tutorial so whilst good interviewing skills are useful, it doesn't necessarily mean you'll ace Oxford's 'interview') then you've still probably got a good chance.
0
reply
perflous
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
What were your GCSE grades and AS grades (and predicted A2s), if you don't mind me asking? Agree with the above, I don't think LSE would reject you entirely based on your personal statement alone - there's possibly other factors as well.

Also, this would be helpful to me personally as I'm looking to apply to LSE next year (during a gap year; I'm currently doing A2) and have "less-than-stellar" GCSE grades, so I'm wondering if I stand any real chance.
0
reply
AnyRandomName
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by ohdarlin)
I just got a rejection notice from LSE this morning, and now I'm feeling nervous about Oxford. The rejection was based on a 'lack of passion' in the personal statement, which my instructors had told me was really good. My qualifications meet the requirements for Oxford and are excellent compared to others at my school, but I was counting on my statement to make me successful. Now I'm worried because I know Oxford is really looking for passion for the subject (in my case, law).

So how different are Oxford and LSE as far as which applicants they admit? Do I have anything to worry about here or am I just freaking myself out?

I should probably note that I'm great at interviews, so as long as I make it that far, I will be confident overall.
LSE do seem to care about the personal statement more than other top universities for law. I think the reason is that, since they don't use the LNAT, they have fewer ways of distinguishing between candidates so obviously each individual element becomes more important as a result.

Oxford don't really care that much about personal statements. In my interview it was pretty much a case of "tell me about x concept that you talked about in your personal statement" and then it was never mentioned again. I suspect the tutor had just skim-read my statement before I walked in. The personal statement question tends to just be a way of easing you into it with an easy question before moving onto the proper interview.

Also, I'd advise you to just be a little cautious about the interview. As another poster said, it's not like a normal job interview. They'll probably give you a case/statute to read before you go in, and then the interview consists of going through it with the tutor and answering questions on it. You're not there to sell yourself/tell them about all the amazing things you've done; you're there to be tested on how well you can think on your feet and express your ideas on questions you've never considered before.

I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have about the process/oxford etc (I'm in my first year doing law)

Oh, and by the way, this is the impression I've got about the order in which Oxford prioritises each element of an application. Others may well disagree so don't take this as gospel:

Interview
GCSE
LNAT
A2 prediction
AS Levels (most people tend to have almost identical AS grades, so they aren't a great discriminator)
School reference
Personal statement
3
reply
mishieru07
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by ohdarlin)
I just got a rejection notice from LSE this morning, and now I'm feeling nervous about Oxford. The rejection was based on a 'lack of passion' in the personal statement, which my instructors had told me was really good. My qualifications meet the requirements for Oxford and are excellent compared to others at my school, but I was counting on my statement to make me successful. Now I'm worried because I know Oxford is really looking for passion for the subject (in my case, law).

So how different are Oxford and LSE as far as which applicants they admit? Do I have anything to worry about here or am I just freaking myself out?

I should probably note that I'm great at interviews, so as long as I make it that far, I will be confident overall.
Don't worry too much about it; I was rejected from LSE but accepted at Oxford for Law when I applied a few years ago. I put it down to a really bad personal statement (my sixth form tutors were completely mistaken as to what a PS should focus on, and I didn't do my due diligence either). Oxford will have your LNAT, so as long as your grades and LNAT are good, I think you have a decent chance of being called for interview

I'm going to disagree and say that they put more emphasis on the LNAT rather than GCSEs; if you ask me, I think the LNAT is a better indicator of how good students are at comprehending material and thinking logically, but that's my guess. I'm now very tempted to ask my tutors how it's done though.
0
reply
ohdarlin
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#6
I'm a mature american student, so my qualifications are a little different. I qualify with an associate's degree in humanities (3.7 gpa on the 4.0 scale) and a 32 ACT score, which are excellent for the schools I've been to, but probably not compared to other oxford applicants. As for my personal statement "making me successful", I was talking about it being the tipping point between me and other similar students, not that it would make up for anything else on my app.

I know the "interview" isn't a traditional interview, but I've taken law classes in which we studied cases in that same manner. That doesn't mean I'm blowing it off, it just means I'm more concerned with whether oxford will reject me before the interview.

American schools don't give feedback, they just reject you and don't say why. So I'm a bit confused as to why LSE would bother giving feedback if it's inaccurate or basically a BS answer, which is what I've inferred from your responses. In any case, I'm thinking that LSE just didn't think I would be a good fit for the program in general, and I think I agree. There's a reason they're my 3rd choice, after all. Thank you all for responding, I feel much better about all of this after a few days of calming down.
0
reply
nexttime
  • Volunteer Team
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
What a **** reason for rejecting someone.
0
reply
indieguy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
Don't lose hope!
0
reply
eusebe
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by ohdarlin)
I'm a mature american student, so my qualifications are a little different. I qualify with an associate's degree in humanities (3.7 gpa on the 4.0 scale) and a 32 ACT score, which are excellent for the schools I've been to, but probably not compared to other oxford applicants. As for my personal statement "making me successful", I was talking about it being the tipping point between me and other similar students, not that it would make up for anything else on my app.

I know the "interview" isn't a traditional interview, but I've taken law classes in which we studied cases in that same manner. That doesn't mean I'm blowing it off, it just means I'm more concerned with whether oxford will reject me before the interview.

American schools don't give feedback, they just reject you and don't say why. So I'm a bit confused as to why LSE would bother giving feedback if it's inaccurate or basically a BS answer, which is what I've inferred from your responses. In any case, I'm thinking that LSE just didn't think I would be a good fit for the program in general, and I think I agree. There's a reason they're my 3rd choice, after all. Thank you all for responding, I feel much better about all of this after a few days of calming down.
Do you know a book to prepare the interview ? or website ?
Thank you in advance
0
reply
amol_chalis447
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by ohdarlin)
I just got a rejection notice from LSE this morning, and now I'm feeling nervous about Oxford. The rejection was based on a 'lack of passion' in the personal statement, which my instructors had told me was really good. My qualifications meet the requirements for Oxford and are excellent compared to others at my school, but I was counting on my statement to make me successful. Now I'm worried because I know Oxford is really looking for passion for the subject (in my case, law).

So how different are Oxford and LSE as far as which applicants they admit? Do I have anything to worry about here or am I just freaking myself out?

I should probably note that I'm great at interviews, so as long as I make it that far, I will be confident overall.
I applied last year to the LSE and Oxford for law as well. I was rejected by the LSE, like you, based on a "lack of passion", but received an offer from Oxford, where I am now. I don't believe I am the exception either, Oxford and the LSE look for different qualities in applicants.
0
reply
ohdarlin
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#11
Just to update: I did get an interview at Oxford, but ultimately didn't receive an offer. I had to leave for England the day after my final exams here, and between that and traveling internationally for the first time I was totally exhausted by the time I got to interview. My feedback said my interview answers were interesting, but not focused enough on the legal aspects of the case. They said everything else was good, especially my LNAT score, which was a 32/42.

So I've decided to reapply next year. I'm still working on my bachelors degree here in the US, so it's not like I'll be wasting my time. Next time I go for the interview I'll know what to expect and I think I'll perform much better.

(Original post by eusebe)
Do you know a book to prepare the interview ? or website ?
Thank you in advance
It's probably a bit late for you now, but for anyone else who comes across this thread: the best thing you can do to prepare for law interviews is to do a mock interview with a lawyer. Ask every adult who cares about you at all (teachers, friends' parents, etc) until you find a lawyer who will help you. reading/discussing cases is unlike anything else, and falling back on normal rhetorical analysis will not be enough for Oxford (that's the big mistake I made in mine).

Another mistake I made was starting with more minor aspects of the case. Do not waste time with that. They will not give you time to make a list of your points, so pick the strongest one and go with it.

For more general but excellent advice on the application process, watch these: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCn6-3D5z2E

International students: prepare for cultural differences (like Brits being very put off by some American behavior that I apparently exhibited because no one talked to me for more than a couple minutes and others refused to speak to me at all). Also remember that you may not be able to call anyone due to international call fees. Therefore, prepare for the possibility of feeling isolated and a bit depressed while you're there. Bring something with you that will cheer you up, and above all, remember why you're there. Focus on preparing for your interviews so that the strangeness of the environment doesn't diminish your performance.
0
reply
the1akshay
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
Just to chip in for next year if you plan on reapplying to the LSE: they really really care about the personal statement.
0
reply
Jasaron
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by ohdarlin)
I just got a rejection notice from LSE this morning, and now I'm feeling nervous about Oxford. The rejection was based on a 'lack of passion' in the personal statement, which my instructors had told me was really good. My qualifications meet the requirements for Oxford and are excellent compared to others at my school, but I was counting on my statement to make me successful. Now I'm worried because I know Oxford is really looking for passion for the subject (in my case, law).

So how different are Oxford and LSE as far as which applicants they admit? Do I have anything to worry about here or am I just freaking myself out?

I should probably note that I'm great at interviews, so as long as I make it that far, I will be confident overall.
Loads of people get offers from the LSE and rejections from Oxford (I did!).

Other people get rejections from the LSE and offers from Oxford.

They look at very different things.

I sincerely hope you get an offer from Oxford, but it's not the end of the world if you don't. Lots of other good law courses out there.

EDIT: 2014 FFS.
0
reply
Parliament
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by nexttime)
What a **** reason for rejecting someone.
Especially at LSE, lol

'Passion' is not a word which springs to mind when thinking of LSE... if their feedback had been 'personal statement doesn't contain enough evidence of willingness to sell soul to large investment bank' then I would've been less surprised
0
reply
DCDude
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
Jasaron and Parliament, this thread is 2.5 years old...OP is long gone....
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 3 Jul '19
  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Thu, 4 Jul '19
  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 20 Sep '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (292)
37.63%
No - but I will (55)
7.09%
No - I don't want to (56)
7.22%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (373)
48.07%

Watched Threads

View All