University of Chester Law Watch

CalT8
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I'm aware that the law course at the University of Chester is new and therefore perhaps hasn't built up the reputation of more established universities, and that it won't be on par with the likes of Durham etc; However I'd like to know how well it is regarded by potential employers, not necessarily the high-level city firms but just in general, is it an acceptable place to study?
If anyone has first hand experience of studying the actual course there and can provide me with information on quality of lectures etc; I'd be very interested to hear. Thank you.
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ComfortOOchefu
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the lectures are really good. the lectures are usually in powerpoint form. they are usually an hour long each. The lectures will also be provided on the university webpage for the students to go through afterwards so that any work they have missed can be updated. In regards to employability. The chester careers office is amazing and has lots of informations for those who want to be barrister and solicitors. there are lot`s of events such a networking events such as the manchester law fair where the uni takes a coach to. at the fair you can speak to magic and silver circle fairs and local fairs. there is also a module in the second called enhance your employability where you are put onto a 6 week placement of your choice and can build connections. if you need any more information just ask
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CoralWoodcock
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Hi, I'm currently a second year studying LLB Law with Business at the University of Chester. When initially deciding on which uni to attend, I had ooffers from both Chester and the University of Birmingham, and at first glance, Birmingham seemed to be far more prestigious and grand but I've quickly discovered that I made the right choice coming to Chester.

With Birmingham being considered 14th best University in the UK for Law and Chester far lower down in the tables, it might seem unusual that it ended up being the right decision. But that is largely attributed to the quality of teaching that you receive. The lecturers make it a point to inform you that there priorities are to the students whereas often in bigger universities, you find that the lecturers are also pursuing research etc. to further develop their own image and reputation.

At Chester, I've found that the size and relative newness of the Law School to be a big bonus. I think Law has been at the university since 2005, and since last year, there has been the move to a separate Law School off main campus which in actuality is lovely. The cohort size for law usually sits around 135 annual intake compared to places like Manchester and Birmingham which have around 250-300. For me, this meant that lecturers are able to get to know you better and you are really given the chance to progress yourself not only through studies but extra curricular activities. Because you are able to partake in so many activities, I felt that I could do more for myself at Chester than Birmingham. From everything I've been hearing from Solicitors, Lecturers and Career Advisors, simply obtaining a degree isn't enough anymore. It's all about the extras and that is what is going to set you apart, not which particular university you go to. Especially studying law, you are required to learn specific modules in order to obtain a qualifying law degree, so you will have the same learning experience (although it may be studied during different years)

In first year, admittedly, there are a couple of dry subjects (depending on whether you do an LLB with or straight law) such as Property Law, but that does not mean that you can't get through it and do well, as many of my cohort did. In first year if you are studying straight law you will have Contract, Public, Property Law as well as the Law in Context, English Legal System and Law Ethics and Morality.

Hope this helps at least a bit
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rmcsharry
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(Original post by CalT8)
I'm aware that the law course at the University of Chester is new and therefore perhaps hasn't built up the reputation of more established universities, and that it won't be on par with the likes of Durham etc; However I'd like to know how well it is regarded by potential employers, not necessarily the high-level city firms but just in general, is it an acceptable place to study?
If anyone has first hand experience of studying the actual course there and can provide me with information on quality of lectures etc; I'd be very interested to hear. Thank you.
Hi there! I'm currently in my first year.

I understand what you're saying about the league tables, but at the end of the day, a degree is a degree, the effort you put in is what the employers at the end are going to value. I know for a fact at Chester they seriously put in the work so that you'll be prepared. I've actually already had four training sessions on how to use the law library, locate journals, how to reference, and how to use online platforms to help me with my studies.

If it's employability you're worried about, Chester uni actually has a whole team set up just for careers advice and employability. They help out with stuff like organising work placements, organising volunteering, writing CV's etc. It is incredibly valuable to an employer to see someone with not only a degree, but also with that little extra that sets them apart from the rest of the crowd, everyone going for that job will have a degree, the work the uni puts in for you makes sure that you have a head start on the rest.

As for the teaching, its very interactive. Firstly in lectures, powerpoints are set up, and the lecturer will take you through it, adding in little extra details, outlining cases etc, the powerpoints are put up online also, so if you want to download them and note down any points you missed there's no problem there. In seminars you'll be asked to prepare some answers, and the professor will go through the answers with you, make sure everyone is up to speed; it also gives everyone else in the room a good chance to listen to different interpretations of the work. And finally workshops, this is the most hands on sort of lesson, generally a topic or theme will be put forward, and in small groups you have a chance to discuss it, listen to other interpretations, and the professor will be there to throw in even more variations and really get you thinking!

I hope I've helped in some way, any other questions any current student will be more than happy to help out!!
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