Is Management/Business Really A "Mickey Mouse" Degree? Watch

BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Is it not very reputable even if done at somewhere like Warwick or KCL (or, to a latter extent, the likes of SOAS or Queen Mary)?

I'm thinking of applying to do it - the only other option for me would be Economics, but, to be honest, though I'm very good at Maths it doesn't appeal to me half as much. Oxbridge doesn't offer straight Management either (E & M is very Economics-heavy) and I would have wanted to apply there, but ofc that's not a good reason not to choose it as a degree.

I've heard that the sort of thing you learn in a Management degree is not worth undergoing an actual degree for. Is this true? Would I be better off doing a subject with more of a "rigorous" reputation, such as Economics?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
Is it not very reputable even if done at somewhere like Warwick or KCL (or, to a latter extent, the likes of SOAS or Queen Mary)?

I'm thinking of applying to do it - the only other option for me would be Economics, but, to be honest, though I'm very good at Maths it doesn't appeal to me half as much. Oxbridge doesn't offer straight Management either (E & M is very Economics-heavy) and I would have wanted to apply there, but ofc that's not a good reason not to choose it as a degree.

I've heard that the sort of thing you learn in a Management degree is not worth undergoing an actual degree for. Is this true? Would I be better off doing a subject with more of a "rigorous" reputation, such as Economics?
It's certainly quite a common view that such degrees are "mickey mouse" - but is this amongst employers as well?

But a lot of the business and management students at my university did manage to secure relevant, well paid graduate jobs upon graduation. Some of said grad jobs/schemes did also specify a business/management degree too.

For most non-technical jobs, the degree itself isn't too important, but rather your other skills and how well you interview. For most jobs, your CV is quite unlikely to be thrown in the big because it says something like BA(Hons) Business Management.
1
reply
Mackay
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
I'm thinking of applying to do it
Do it then. End of discussion. End of thread.

My advice? Do what YOU want. What YOU enjoy. Life really is too short to be worrying about what others on TSR think of your degree choice.
5
reply
Iggy Azalea
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
There's always going to be a demand for Mickey Mouse degrees, since a lot of them are vocational despite they're bad reputation. So I wouldn't worry too much.
0
reply
BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Smack)
It's certainly quite a common view that such degrees are "mickey mouse" - but is this amongst employers as well?

But a lot of the business and management students at my university did manage to secure relevant, well paid graduate jobs upon graduation. Some of said grad jobs/schemes did also specify a business/management degree too.

For most non-technical jobs, the degree itself isn't too important, but rather your other skills and how well you interview. For most jobs, your CV is quite unlikely to be thrown in the big because it says something like BA(Hons) Business Management.
Thanks, great advice Which university did you go to if you don't mind me asking? And which grad jobs/schemes tend to require a business or management degree?

(Original post by Mackay)
Do it then. End of discussion. End of thread.

My advice? Do what YOU want. What YOU enjoy. Life really is too short to be worrying about what others on TSR think of your degree choice.


It's not about what people on TSR think, but obviously some degrees tend to be more reputable to employers than others. (E.g. generally speaking, Law > Art History).
0
reply
BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by Iggy Azalea)
There's always going to be a demand for Mickey Mouse degrees, since a lot of them are vocational despite they're their bad reputation. So I wouldn't worry too much.
If you're going to troll, at least use proper English
0
reply
Bullscheiße
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
http://www.unistats.com/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search
http://www.unistats.com/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search
0
reply
Iggy Azalea
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
If you're going to troll, at least use proper English
Not trolling and my first language is Afrikaans, not English, so lighten up a tiny bit.
0
reply
BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#9
Cheers man
0
reply
Bullscheiße
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
Cheers man
You're welcome
0
reply
s.a.u
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
Oxbridge doesn't offer straight Management either (E & M is very Economics-heavy)...Would I be better off doing a subject with more of a "rigorous" reputation, such as Economics?
a) I'm pretty sure Cambridge offer Management. But I think you cannot apply to it, you have to transfer into it after first year (at least this is what their 2013 prospectus said)

b) You would be better off doing Economics I think. The maths is not impossible, once you understand it it's pretty easy. The maths doesn't really go beyond differentiation, simultaneous equations, and of course statistics
0
reply
BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by s.a.u)
a) I'm pretty sure Cambridge offer Management. But I think you cannot apply to it, you have to transfer into it after first year (at least this is what their 2013 prospectus said)

b) You would be better off doing Economics I think. The maths is not impossible, once you understand it it's pretty easy. The maths doesn't really go beyond differentiation, simultaneous equations, and of course statistics
Yeah, you can transfer into it there, but there's no guarantee I'll get into there, and if not I'll have to study Economics for all 3 years at another uni

Why do you think Economics would be better? Just re: job prospects? As I said in the OP, I'm good at Maths - I just feel that Economics is a little theory-heavy for me, whereas Management talks about more things that can be applied IRL.
0
reply
s.a.u
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
x
Yes, I think mostly for job prospects (but then again, what do I know), but also because it delves deeper than Management/Business. At least at my uni people studying those subjects have to take some economics modules anyway, but only the basics.

But of course it can very abstract, which is something I have found annoying at times, especially if the models categorically do not work in the real world. If that would be a major problem, maybe economics isn't right.

By the way, I'm dual honours Economics and Politics
0
reply
BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#14
(Original post by s.a.u)
Yes, I think mostly for job prospects (but then again, what do I know), but also because it delves deeper than Management/Business. At least at my uni people studying those subjects have to take some economics modules anyway, but only the basics.

But of course it can very abstract, which is something I have found annoying at times, especially if the models categorically do not work in the real world. If that would be a major problem, maybe economics isn't right.


By the way, I'm dual honours Economics and Politics
Yep, that was a major concern of mine TBH Are there any books you'd recommend I read on Economics? I'm choosing my AS subjects right now (I'm a mature student) so I won't have to decide for another year, I just want to pick my A-levels based on my uni subject too as obviously if I do apply for Economics requirements are very high.

What's Economics and Politics like? It seems pretty interesting
0
reply
gr8wizard10
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
If you get into a reputable business School. LSE/Warwick/Cass/KCL/L'boro etc.. etc..

It's like any other degree. It's not only the degree name that will get you a job at the end of the day.
0
reply
s.a.u
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
Yep, that was a major concern of mine TBH Are there any books you'd recommend I read on Economics? I'm choosing my AS subjects right now (I'm a mature student) so I won't have to decide for another year, I just want to pick my A-levels based on my uni subject too as obviously if I do apply for Economics requirements are very high.

What's Economics and Politics like? It seems pretty interesting
I didn't do A Level Economics, but this was pretty good for first year. 'Principles of Economics'. One of the authors is Ben Bernanke! Economics and Politics is really interesting, unfortunately though there are next to no crossover modules. Political Economy is the only one, and it basically just rips economic concepts and models and applies them to political decisions. However, it is an interesting module. Even though they don't crossover in terms of modules, studying both allows a deeper appreciation of the ideas and concepts
0
reply
BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#17
(Original post by Anonynous)
If you get into a reputable business School. LSE/Warwick/Cass/KCL/L'boro etc.. etc..

It's like any other degree. It's not only the degree name that will get you a job at the end of the day.
True that :yep:

Is Loughborough that reputable for Business? Heard it had a super gym, wasn't sure about the ranking though :lol:
0
reply
Mr CS
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
(Original post by Iggy Azalea)
There's always going to be a demand for Mickey Mouse degrees, since a lot of them are vocational despite they're bad reputation. So I wouldn't worry too much.
There's no such thing as a Mickey Mouse degree. It's just a label used by elitists who think they know everything about a degree but in reality know very little about what those actual degrees involve.
1
reply
BreakingBadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#19
(Original post by s.a.u)
I didn't do A Level Economics, but this was pretty good for first year. 'Principles of Economics'. One of the authors is Ben Bernanke! Economics and Politics is really interesting, unfortunately though there are next to no crossover modules. Political Economy is the only one, and it basically just rips economic concepts and models and applies them to political decisions. However, it is an interesting module. Even though they don't crossover in terms of modules, studying both allows a deeper appreciation of the ideas and concepts
Thanks, I'll see if I can find that Wow, that's pretty neat!

That's a shame, more crossover modules would definitely be interesting - I guess doing both subjects is still better than nothing, though. What university are you at, if you don't mind me asking? I'm guessing you do your course across two departments?
0
reply
gr8wizard10
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#20
Report 5 years ago
#20
(Original post by BreakingBadx)
True that :yep:

Is Loughborough that reputable for Business? Heard it had a super gym, wasn't sure about the ranking though :lol:
It's highly ranked in Sports/Engineering/Business. It's top 10 for Business, I think in completeuniversityguide it was ranked 6th last year.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you get study leave?

Yes- I like it (285)
60.51%
Yes- I don't like it (22)
4.67%
No- I want it (129)
27.39%
No- I don't want it (35)
7.43%

Watched Threads

View All