TSR Cubing Society Watch

aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Welcome to The Student Room's very own cubing society!

Are you a speedcuber, a collector, a novice or someone just curious to learn more about cubing? If you are any of these, this group is for you.

Here we can discuss cubing, help other members with difficulties they may have in solving certain puzzles, compare our times (maybe even hold our own competition) and just socialise with like-minded people.


Join the group here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/group.php?groupid=2825


So to get us started, I'll introduce myself. I'm a collector, with 17 twisty puzzles in my collection and a long-awaited 3x4x5 on its way in the post! My favourite puzzle probably is the Curvy Copter and my personal best on the 3x3x3 is 24 seconds, although I haven't learnt the Friedrich algorithms.

What about you?


0
reply
Dylann
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
Mainly a standard 3x3 solver here, but can solve 2x2, 4x4 and 5x5 in reasonable efficiency

Also like the square-1 because it's so weird

Personal best 3x3: 12.9 seconds
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by Dylann)
Mainly a standard 3x3 solver here, but can solve 2x2, 4x4 and 5x5 in reasonable efficiency

Also like the square-1 because it's so weird

Personal best 3x3: 12.9 seconds
Square -1 is awesome <3 if you take it out of cube shape and make an incomplete turn down the middle it looks a bit like fireworks.

I made the mistake of getting the super square 1. Turns out due to its build you can't have all the big pieces on one side since they don't fit so it just explodes whenever you try to solve it.

Have you taken part in any competitions? Your pb is very impressive!

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Edminzodo
  • Forum Helper
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
Rubik's Cubes or the numbers?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by Edminzodo)
Rubik's Cubes or the numbers?

Posted from TSR Mobile
There is a variety of variations on the rubik's cube. Collectively they are called "twisty puzzles", you can check out the group's pictures to see some of them

The solution to many is quite similar but then you get puzzles that turn completely differently, for example on their faces, corners or sides or are of a totally different shape so need totally different approaches.

Which puzzles do you like and what do you mean by the numbers?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Dylann
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by aersh8)
Square -1 is awesome <3 if you take it out of cube shape and make an incomplete turn down the middle it looks a bit like fireworks.

I made the mistake of getting the super square 1. Turns out due to its build you can't have all the big pieces on one side since they don't fit so it just explodes whenever you try to solve it.

Have you taken part in any competitions? Your pb is very impressive!

Posted from TSR Mobile
I haven't touched my square-1 in ages (in fact I have hardly touched any cubes recently)...might try and solve it again soon though!

Never had the chance to take part...quite lazy really lol. I went to a World Record attempt back in 2012 with my school but other than that nothing else Rubik's related.

What about you? You have an impressive collection!
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by Dylann)
I haven't touched my square-1 in ages (in fact I have hardly touched any cubes recently)...might try and solve it again soon though!

Never had the chance to take part...quite lazy really lol. I went to a World Record attempt back in 2012 with my school but other than that nothing else Rubik's related.

What about you? You have an impressive collection!
Thanks! I spend all my maths and Physics lessons cubing (and whenever I want to relax at home) living in Greece I've never had a chance to compete. I'll learn Friedrich over the summer, buy a speedcube and then compete in uni next year.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
DJMayes
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
Learned how to do a Rubik's cube over the summer. My time of 4 minutes, 9 seconds is certainly nothing to compare to anyone here though.
0
reply
BrownEyedGirl92
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
I've never solved a cube
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by DJMayes)
Learned how to do a Rubik's cube over the summer. My time of 4 minutes, 9 seconds is certainly nothing to compare to anyone here though.
We've all started like that practice really improves times and once you feel confident with the beginner's method you can move on to faster ways of solving.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#11
(Original post by BrownEyedGirl92)
I've never solved a cube
Do you want to learn?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
BrownEyedGirl92
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by aersh8)
Do you want to learn?

Posted from TSR Mobile
I'd love to learn.
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#13
(Original post by BrownEyedGirl92)
I'd love to learn.
A very good guide to learning are Dan Brown's videos on YouTube, you can check him out or I can send you a link when I get home if you can't find them a lot of cubers started their journey with him and I definitely recommend him for the first solve

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
c.t.14
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 years ago
#14
(Original post by aersh8)
Welcome to The Student Room's very own cubing society!

Are you a speedcuber, a collector, a novice or someone just curious to learn more about cubing? If you are any of these, this group is for you.

Here we can discuss cubing, help other members with difficulties they may have in solving certain puzzles, compare our times (maybe even hold our own competition) and just socialise with like-minded people.


Join the group here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/group.php?groupid=2825


So to get us started, I'll introduce myself. I'm a collector, with 17 twisty puzzles in my collection and a long-awaited 3x4x5 on its way in the post! My favourite puzzle probably is the Curvy Copter and my personal best on the 3x3x3 is 24 seconds, although I haven't learnt the Friedrich algorithms.

What about you?
Sorry to dredge up this thread.

I learned to solve the 3x3 cube about 5 years ago, and I found my cube again recently and thought about getting back into it. I was never a speed-cuber by any means, my PB was about 60 seconds, but my average was probably 80-90 seconds. I learned the Dan Brown method you alluded to when I first started, and I still remember it all these years later! Is there another, faster, method of solving the cube you can recommend?
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#15
(Original post by c.t.14)
Sorry to dredge up this thread.

I learned to solve the 3x3 cube about 5 years ago, and I found my cube again recently and thought about getting back into it. I was never a speed-cuber by any means, my PB was about 60 seconds, but my average was probably 80-90 seconds. I learned the Dan Brown method you alluded to when I first started, and I still remember it all these years later! Is there another, faster, method of solving the cube you can recommend?
The most popular method used by most speescubers is "F2L (first 2 layers), OLL (orient last layer) and PLL (permute last layer)"

F2L is an intuitive way of solving the first two layers. First you make your cross and then you fit in the bottom corners and middle edges simultaneously. You can watch some tutorials but it takes a lot of practice to become quick at it.

OLL and PLL however involve learning off by heart around 150 algorithms so you must be very dedicated to do so.

I personally have found that certain other algorithms (that apply to all cases) are a bit faster than Dan Brown's method. First, you form the top cross the same way. But if you get the L shape instead of doing "front right up right up front" do "front up right up right front"
Then you will want to get the top the same colour stickers. To do this use the algorithm Dan Brown uses to move the top edges. The number of times and direction depends on how your stickers are positioned. Then there is one algorithm to move the corners into the right place and another to move the edges into the right place. It's a bit tricky to explain the cases in words so if you want I can make a video.

This method has got me down to 20s, but to go below that you'll have to learn quite a lot of algorithms. Also make sure that your cube is well lubricated.

I hope this helps!

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
c.t.14
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 years ago
#16
(Original post by aersh8)
I personally have found that certain other algorithms (that apply to all cases) are a bit faster than Dan Brown's method. First, you form the top cross the same way. But if you get the L shape instead of doing "front right up right up front" do "front up right up right front"
I can't actually remember what any of the algorithms are, but my hands can still remember all the moves years later (must have good muscle memory ). When I think about it, this method you suggest is the one that I learned when I first started, obviously it wasn't Dan Brown's videos that I used - I only watched the first couple of minutes of his video before I commented, and I thought it was the same.

If you can do it this way and get in the 20s then you clearly have much more dexterity than I do The cube that I have isn't the best, it's my dad's old cube from the '80s when the Rubik's cube craze started - I do remember opening it up and lubricating it though.

I'll look into the other methods you suggested, thanks
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#17
(Original post by c.t.14)
I can't actually remember what any of the algorithms are, but my hands can still remember all the moves years later (must have good muscle memory ). When I think about it, this method you suggest is the one that I learned when I first started, obviously it wasn't Dan Brown's videos that I used - I only watched the first couple of minutes of his video before I commented, and I thought it was the same.

If you can do it this way and get in the 20s then you clearly have much more dexterity than I do The cube that I have isn't the best, it's my dad's old cube from the '80s when the Rubik's cube craze started - I do remember opening it up and lubricating it though.

I'll look into the other methods you suggested, thanks
You are very welcome my cube is a freebie that came with some other twisty puzzles I ordered so it's not too good either. The thing you definitely save time compared with the beginner's method that's quite easy is the first two layers. At first your time will increase but as you get the hang of it you can easily save 30s if not more. Memyselfandpi has a reasonably good video on it as far as I remember (the F2L thing)

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
SirMasterKey
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 years ago
#18
Do you ask other people to make the cube random for you?

I've always wanted to try and solve a Rubix's cube but just never bought one to do it.
0
reply
aersh8
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#19
(Original post by SirMasterKey)
Do you ask other people to make the cube random for you?

I've always wanted to try and solve a Rubix's cube but just never bought one to do it.
You mean to scramble it? Sometimes - it makes it more interesting for people to watch since they don't think I'm cheating.

There are many cheap cubes for sale that can cost £2 or even less. It is really worth trying because it is really fun and gives you an immense feeling of satisfaction

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Dylann
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 years ago
#20
(Original post by aersh8)
You mean to scramble it? Sometimes - it makes it more interesting for people to watch since they don't think I'm cheating.

There are many cheap cubes for sale that can cost £2 or even less. It is really worth trying because it is really fun and gives you an immense feeling of satisfaction

Posted from TSR Mobile
Lol never buy a cube that's below £5! It will break before you get frustrated enough to break it yourself. Buy a proper standard cube (they're not fast but they last). Then switch to speedcubes when you're ready

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (385)
37.16%
No - but I will (80)
7.72%
No - I don't want to (72)
6.95%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (499)
48.17%

Watched Threads

View All