Symbol for Taylor & Maclaurin series? Watch

Sidhant Shivram
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Hello there!

Could you please tell me what symbol am I supposed to use to show Taylor/Maclaurin series? For e.g.. : If I am asked :

1) "Find the Maclaurin series of 1/1-x", do I just write 1/1-x = 1 + x + x^2 + ... or something like M(f) = M(1/1-x) = 1 + x + x^2 + ... ?

2) "Find the Taylor series of 1/x at a = 1", do I just write 1/x = 1 - (x-1) + (x-1)^2 - (x-1)^3 + ... or something like T(f,a) = T(1/x , 1) = 1 - (x-1) + (x-1)^2 - (x-1)^3 + ... ?

PS : My professor used the T(f,a) notation once at a lecture. I just followed the pattern with the Maclaurin series. I don't know for sure if either of the 2 notations are legit.

Thank you!
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Hasufel
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i`d personally feel more comfortable if people new exactly what i was talking about from the start - i`d do the working, and then just say something like, "by the Maclaurin series expansion, f(x) = and give the x range in which this is valid.
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davros
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(Original post by Sidhant Shivram)
Hello there!

Could you please tell me what symbol am I supposed to use to show Taylor/Maclaurin series? For e.g.. : If I am asked :

1) "Find the Maclaurin series of 1/1-x", do I just write 1/1-x = 1 + x + x^2 + ... or something like M(f) = M(1/1-x) = 1 + x + x^2 + ... ?

2) "Find the Taylor series of 1/x at a = 1", do I just write 1/x = 1 - (x-1) + (x-1)^2 - (x-1)^3 + ... or something like T(f,a) = T(1/x , 1) = 1 - (x-1) + (x-1)^2 - (x-1)^3 + ... ?

PS : My professor used the T(f,a) notation once at a lecture. I just followed the pattern with the Maclaurin series. I don't know for sure if either of the 2 notations are legit.

Thank you!

Thank you!
I've never actually seen either of those 2 notations, although that doesn't mean they're invalid!


Normally people just write the first few terms plus an indication of the general term (in terms of n), or they use the standard sigma notation for infinite series where you just write down the general term in terms of index n, summed from n = 0 to infinity.
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