Rebekah98
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Hello there! This is my first time posting so I apologise if I say anything wrong

We had to write an essay the other day for English, which compared the way hate was portrayed from three different occasions in Romeo and Juliet. The first one I wrote about was the Prince's speech in Act 1 Scene 1. I said "The audience is aware of the Prince's hate when he says 'What you, you men, you beasts!'. The use of the word 'beasts' makes the audience think of a viscous animal that cannot be tamed." I wrote a bit more around that too. We then had it marked and have targets to improve our work, and mine says "You could use literary terminology to describe some words- e.g. what is 'beasts'?" I don't really understand what it means though. Is it like the opposite to personification? Which literary term fits it best?
Thanks to anyone who helps me, it's very appreciated
Rebekah
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by Rebekah98)
Hello there! This is my first time posting so I apologise if I say anything wrong

We had to write an essay the other day for English, which compared the way hate was portrayed from three different occasions in Romeo and Juliet. The first one I wrote about was the Prince's speech in Act 1 Scene 1. I said "The audience is aware of the Prince's hate when he says 'What you, you men, you beasts!'. The use of the word 'beasts' makes the audience think of a viscous animal that cannot be tamed." I wrote a bit more around that too. We then had it marked and have targets to improve our work, and mine says "You could use literary terminology to describe some words- e.g. what is 'beasts'?" I don't really understand what it means though. Is it like the opposite to personification? Which literary term fits it best?
Thanks to anyone who helps me, it's very appreciated
Rebekah
Literary terminology could mean anything from a metaphor to personification. I would say metaphor would fit nicely. Or you could say the "connotation of the word beasts suggests...." connotation is a literary term too. So either word would be fine, but you just have to reword your sentence when deciding which one you would like to have.
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Rebekah98
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
Literary terminology could mean anything from a metaphor to personification. I would say metaphor would fit nicely. Or you could say the "connotation of the word beasts suggests...." connotation is a literary term too. So either word would be fine, but you just have to reword your sentence when deciding which one you would like to have.
thank you so much!!
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