I don't know how to revise?! Watch

_sara
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I hardly revised for gcse's, I got average results but A-levels are a lot harder and I'm not sure how i'm meant to revise to prepare for my exams. I already feel so behind and like i'm going to fail.
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_Azn_
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-Make notes from the textbook,
-Gather all past papers - http://freeexampapers.com. If your doing maths - get solomon papers also
-In GCSE, you would get marks if you have one word that is in the mark scheme but in A level this isn't possible so gather every mark scheme and examiner reports and try to form your answers in the way the examiner wants you to.
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chewey
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What subjects do you do?
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_Azn_
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(Original post by chewey)
What subjects do you do?
Me or the other person?
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chewey
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(Original post by _Azn_)
Me or the other person?
The other person
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DLau88
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Read notes and do questions.
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tearteto
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Do every question possible. Make sure that you're not teaching yourself just the methods on how to do a problem or question - but rather you understand the reason behind the method. Once you've understood it then you'll find most questions much easier. if it's a more detailed "remember this" subject like history or business where there is little method involved then its just a case of ploughing through notes and knowing how to answer the questions properly.
I always found it helped me to read ahead for next lesson, just for half an hour or so and make notes - that way it would all click together when it came to lesson time and I could keep up with much greater ease.
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pencil_case
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Make mind-maps on posters and stick them around your room and read them occasionally, so you absorb the information over time but it stays in your head longer. Doing them in colour also helps.
Write out exemplar answers to questions and learn as much of the mark scheme as you can.
It sounds a bit silly, but teach the topic your learning to somebody else (or to a stuffed animal). It begins to make more sense to yourself when your the one explaining it out loud.
A ton of past papers.
Watch some videos on youtube and listen to podcasts. I'd go crazy if all I did was just read endless notes.

Good luck!
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_sara
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(Original post by chewey)
The other person
Hi, I do History, sociology, philosophy and ethics and government and politics.
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_sara
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(Original post by _Azn_)
-Make notes from the textbook,
-Gather all past papers - http://freeexampapers.com. If your doing maths - get solomon papers also
-In GCSE, you would get marks if you have one word that is in the mark scheme but in A level this isn't possible so gather every mark scheme and examiner reports and try to form your answers in the way the examiner wants you to.
Thank you
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_sara
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(Original post by tearteto)
Do every question possible. Make sure that you're not teaching yourself just the methods on how to do a problem or question - but rather you understand the reason behind the method. Once you've understood it then you'll find most questions much easier. if it's a more detailed "remember this" subject like history or business where there is little method involved then its just a case of ploughing through notes and knowing how to answer the questions properly.
I always found it helped me to read ahead for next lesson, just for half an hour or so and make notes - that way it would all click together when it came to lesson time and I could keep up with much greater ease.
Thanks for such a detailed reply, I like the idea of reading ahead.
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_sara
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(Original post by pencil_case)
Make mind-maps on posters and stick them around your room and read them occasionally, so you absorb the information over time but it stays in your head longer. Doing them in colour also helps.
Write out exemplar answers to questions and learn as much of the mark scheme as you can.
It sounds a bit silly, but teach the topic your learning to somebody else (or to a stuffed animal). It begins to make more sense to yourself when your the one explaining it out loud.
A ton of past papers.
Watch some videos on youtube and listen to podcasts. I'd go crazy if all I did was just read endless notes.

Good luck!
Thank you so much! I'll definitely try the method of teaching to someone else, I think it will really help learn it adequately.
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chewey
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(Original post by _sara)
Hi, I do History, sociology, philosophy and ethics and government and politics.
What topics are you doing in History?

I used an AQA textbook to read from and make notes and then mind maps from, as well as a guide off amazon called 'My Revision Notes: -topic-'. In the books I used the activities and exam practice and after that I would use past papers.
For history(I suppose it'd work for other subjects too) I think it's good to make a huge mind map with all of the topics on and then subtopics so you can put everything summarised in one place, and you could also do this to see how much info you've actually retained.

My friend does sociology and it seems to be set essays from what I've seen? She rewrote everything until she knew it off by heart - boring but it worked for her
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Edminzodo
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Join the club!

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_sara
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(Original post by chewey)
What topics are you doing in History?

I used an AQA textbook to read from and make notes and then mind maps from, as well as a guide off amazon called 'My Revision Notes: -topic-'. In the books I used the activities and exam practice and after that I would use past papers.
For history(I suppose it'd work for other subjects too) I think it's good to make a huge mind map with all of the topics on and then subtopics so you can put everything summarised in one place, and you could also do this to see how much info you've actually retained.

My friend does sociology and it seems to be set essays from what I've seen? She rewrote everything until she knew it off by heart - boring but it worked for her
Thanks for such an in-depth answer! I'll try making a mind-map it sounds like a good idea, and the topics that I'm doing in history are Britain 1483-1529 and communist Russia.
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Ben4
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(Original post by chewey)
What topics are you doing in History?

I used an AQA textbook to read from and make notes and then mind maps from, as well as a guide off amazon called 'My Revision Notes: -topic-'. In the books I used the activities and exam practice and after that I would use past papers.
For history(I suppose it'd work for other subjects too) I think it's good to make a huge mind map with all of the topics on and then subtopics so you can put everything summarised in one place, and you could also do this to see how much info you've actually retained.

My friend does sociology and it seems to be set essays from what I've seen? She rewrote everything until she knew it off by heart - boring but it worked for her
Are the my revision notes books good?

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chewey
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(Original post by Ben4)
Are the my revision notes books good?

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I found them good for recapping everything because they summarise the main info well.
If you have kindle app you can download a free sample to see, or buy the kindle version and get a refund if you 'return' it within 2 days or something
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