Why do people talk about the first non-White Prime Minister? Watch

indigobluesss
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People may talk about wanting a black/gay/purple PM, but I think the day we move forward, is the day we get a PM from a low financial background
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Quady
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(Original post by R Dragon)
People may talk about wanting a black/gay/purple PM, but I think the day we move forward, is the day we get a PM from a low financial background
Like John Major or Thatcher?
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gladders
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Or Ramsay MacDonald?
Or Clement Attlee?
Or Harold Wilson?
Or James Callaghan?
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indigobluesss
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(Original post by Quady)
Like John Major or Thatcher?
Wasn't John Major a banker ._. and his dad did own a business.... so he isn't really someone I'd see as poor.

Thatcher's father owned 2 grocery shops, so I don't consider her poor, either.
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Quady
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(Original post by R Dragon)
Wasn't John Major a banker ._. and his dad did own a business.... so he isn't really someone I'd see as poor.

Thatcher's father owned 2 grocery shops, so I don't consider her poor, either.
Since he only got 3 O Levels he did a correspondance course in banking and got a job in a bank yup. His dad was a music hall performer who then started making garden gnobes to sell.

What level of poor were you thinking about?
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indigobluesss
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(Original post by Quady)
Since he only got 3 O Levels he did a correspondance course in banking and got a job in a bank yup. His dad was a music hall performer who then started making garden gnobes to sell.

What level of poor were you thinking about?
I'm talking about to the point where their families are eligible for financial assistance
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gladders
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(Original post by R Dragon)
I'm talking about to the point where their families are eligible for financial assistance
On what grounds? And on our level, or the level of the past?

And why would someone from such a background be more qualified to be PM than me?
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illegaltobepoor
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Cameron is disabled because at best hes blind and deaf.
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indigobluesss
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(Original post by gladders)
On what grounds? And on our level, or the level of the past?

And why would someone from such a background be more qualified to be PM than me?
Well, I'm not aware of your financial situation so I can't answer that to a certain extent.

But I think if we have someone from a lower financial background, he/she may be able to represent people like me better
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Louis.
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Alan Johnson is almost a good contemporary example of what you're looking for, but he didn't quite make it. Might have become Labour leader or even Prime Minister at certain points in history if things had been different. Miliband mis-managed him and lost someone who could have been an important electoral asset, could have been a good contrast between him and the current class of politicians.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by R Dragon)
People may talk about wanting a black/gay/purple PM, but I think the day we move forward, is the day we get a PM from a low financial background
The two MPs who really knew poverty were MacDonald and Major.

Although Lloyd George's immediate family were poor he had backing from a farmer relative. Callaghan was from a financially secure working class family. Attlee, Blair and Cameron were from financially secure upper middle class families. Wilson, Heath, Brown and Thatcher were from financially secure lower middle class families.

Both Major and MacDonald were from families with very rickety finances. They are the two PMs who parents couldn't guarantee to have food on the table or to afford not to have holes in their shoes.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by R Dragon)
People may talk about wanting a black/gay/purple PM, but I think the day we move forward, is the day we get a PM from a low financial background
While it would be great to once again see a state educated PM elected (purely as a sign of mobility) i think that we need get around this notion that somebody from a lower class background would shield the poor or some such notion out of empathy. I don't know your political views but it's equally wrong to think they'd be a socialist and a great example of this are Thatcher and Major, two people fairly representative of families in post war Britain, both state educated, both from what could be considered aspirational families (Thatcher's family was historically well off i think, some kind of liberal political connection while Major's family was genuinely poor at times) but both of them oversaw the rise and continuation of the Thatcherite consensus that largely remains today (well, less so in Labour now).

I can't say i'd be any more likely to vote for a candidate who was poor than rich though. Ultimately when i vote for the next Tory leader it will be on the basis of policy.

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indigobluesss
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
The two MPs who really knew poverty were MacDonald and Major.

Although Lloyd George's immediate family were poor he had backing from a farmer relative. Callaghan was from a financially secure working class family. Attlee, Blair and Cameron were from financially secure upper middle class families. Wilson, Heath, Brown and Thatcher were from financially secure lower middle class families.

Both Major and MacDonald were from families with very rickety finances. They are the two PMs who parents couldn't guarantee to have food on the table or to afford not to have holes in their shoes.

Wait guys take a chill pill. I don't know why it says I'm the thread starter, I assume the person who started the thread ran away somewhere...

I just wanted to give my own opinion on the matter, and as a dental student, that opinion is very limited in terms of politics.

I can do my own research about the financial situations of the PMs you mentioned. But that sounds time consuming...

Anyways, have a good day!
(Original post by Rakas21)
While it would be great to once again see a state educated PM elected (purely as a sign of mobility) i think that we need get around this notion that somebody from a lower class background would shield the poor or some such notion out of empathy. I don't know your political views but it's equally wrong to think they'd be a socialist and a great example of this are Thatcher and Major, two people fairly representative of families in post war Britain, both state educated, both from what could be considered aspirational families (Thatcher's family was historically well off i think, some kind of liberal political connection while Major's family was genuinely poor at times) but both of them oversaw the rise and continuation of the Thatcherite consensus that largely remains today (well, less so in Labour now).

I can't say i'd be any more likely to vote for a candidate who was poor than rich though. Ultimately when i vote for the next Tory leader it will be on the basis of policy.

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JamesManc
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Alix Douglass-Hulme!
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The Dictator
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Does someone need to be dirt-poor before they can be considered eligible for the post of Prime Minister?
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by R Dragon)
Wasn't John Major a banker ._. and his dad did own a business.... so he isn't really someone I'd see as poor.

Thatcher's father owned 2 grocery shops, so I don't consider her poor, either.
John major left school at a young age with very few qualification.

Nobody is going to make the jump from shelf stacker to PM without going through some form of personal development.

But as has been explained. That her came from quite humble beginnings compared to most politicians to become the first female PM. Yet still that's not good enough for you.
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