how competitive is graduate veterinary medicine Watch

Audiology-Med
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I'm not sure what degree I should take, I wanted to become a vet but I know i won't get the alevels for it. I'm opting to do a Bsc Healthcare science( audiology) as I do find that course interesting aswell, but then again I still rather become a vet so should I do Bsc animal science course instead and apply for graduate entry for Veterinary medicine, how competitive is it. And is Audiology classed as a Biological science , would I be able to apply with that for graduate entry.
0
reply
suirrel
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by haseebi82)
I'm not sure what degree I should take, I wanted to become a vet but I know i won't get the alevels for it. I'm opting to do a Bsc Healthcare science( audiology) as I do find that course interesting aswell, but then again I still rather become a vet so should I do Bsc animal science course instead and apply for graduate entry for Veterinary medicine, how competitive is it. And is Audiology classed as a Biological science , would I be able to apply with that for graduate entry.
What grades are you getting? I think it would be more appropriate to do a more general biology degree such as Zoology, Biological Science, Microbiology, or Biochemistry.
0
reply
Chlorophile
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by suirrel)
What grades are you getting? I think it would be more appropriate to do a more general biology degree such as Zoology, Biological Science, Microbiology, or Biochemistry.
This, really. The more general the degree (Biological Sciences, Biomedicine or Biochemistry would all be very good choice) the better. Doing an extremely niche degree like Audiology isn't the greatest idea.
0
reply
Tarnia
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
A levels don't just disappear because you do another degree, unfortunately. Many schools still consider them, so your A level grades do still matter.

My understanding is whether to accept someone for graduate entry based on their prior degree is at the discretion of each individual school. In other words, there is no hard and fast rule or answer to your question. The closest you could get IMHO is to contact each vet school's admissions department and ask them directly.

That being said, the graduate entry program tends to 'assume' you have some prior science knowledge, or at least at the schools where it is 4 rather than 5 years it does. So, you are expected to have a working knowledge in some areas, eg cell biology, and this will not be taught again, or might not be taught in as much depth as the non-graduate-entry degree. So I agree that a more general bio degree would be a better choice, from that point of view. Regardless of whether the material is taught or not, it also will prepare you better for the vet med degree, since that is VERY broad.

The flip side of the coin is what if you don't get into vet? What then? If being an audiologist is your plan B, then there is potentially some merit to doing the audiology program. I would again refer you back to the individual universities to see what your options are regarding vet med out of that degree.

Graduate entry is still pretty competitive. Not only do you have all the school leavers that didn't get in but can afford to go the graduate entry route to compete against, you also have the international student pool to compete against. North American students in particular that can afford to do a full-fee vet degree in the UK are not going to be turned off by the fact that it is a graduate degree, because that is NORMAL in the US/Canada. So while some UK students go "another 4 years? I can't wait that long guess I'll move on to plan B"...North American students aren't waiting any longer. And in the case of some American students, potentially aren't paying much more to do their degree in the UK, than they would to go out-of-state in the US. I'm sorry, I don't have any statistics to give you (ie how many accepted out of how many applicants) but if you contact admissions perhaps they can give you those numbers.

Which raises another salient point: just in case you didn't know, doing vet as a second degree means you are paying full fees (9-28,000+ GBP/year, depending on the school) with very little by way of government, academic or bank loans/scholarships/whatever. AKA, that degree comes out of your pocket, or the "bank of mom/dad/family/good friends".

Good luck!
1
reply
Audiology-Med
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by Tarnia)
A levels don't just disappear because you do another degree, unfortunately. Many schools still consider them, so your A level grades do still matter.

My understanding is whether to accept someone for graduate entry based on their prior degree is at the discretion of each individual school. In other words, there is no hard and fast rule or answer to your question. The closest you could get IMHO is to contact each vet school's admissions department and ask them directly.

That being said, the graduate entry program tends to 'assume' you have some prior science knowledge, or at least at the schools where it is 4 rather than 5 years it does. So, you are expected to have a working knowledge in some areas, eg cell biology, and this will not be taught again, or might not be taught in as much depth as the non-graduate-entry degree. So I agree that a more general bio degree would be a better choice, from that point of view. Regardless of whether the material is taught or not, it also will prepare you better for the vet med degree, since that is VERY broad.

The flip side of the coin is what if you don't get into vet? What then? If being an audiologist is your plan B, then there is potentially some merit to doing the audiology program. I would again refer you back to the individual universities to see what your options are regarding vet med out of that degree.

Graduate entry is still pretty competitive. Not only do you have all the school leavers that didn't get in but can afford to go the graduate entry route to compete against, you also have the international student pool to compete against. North American students in particular that can afford to do a full-fee vet degree in the UK are not going to be turned off by the fact that it is a graduate degree, because that is NORMAL in the US/Canada. So while some UK students go "another 4 years? I can't wait that long guess I'll move on to plan B"...North American students aren't waiting any longer. And in the case of some American students, potentially aren't paying much more to do their degree in the UK, than they would to go out-of-state in the US. I'm sorry, I don't have any statistics to give you (ie how many accepted out of how many applicants) but if you contact admissions perhaps they can give you those numbers.

Which raises another salient point: just in case you didn't know, doing vet as a second degree means you are paying full fees (9-28,000+ GBP/year, depending on the school) with very little by way of government, academic or bank loans/scholarships/whatever. AKA, that degree comes out of your pocket, or the "bank of mom/dad/family/good friends".

Good luck!
I took your advise and emailed few of the unis, and they said they won't accept audiology as a first degree for postgraduate study because it only focuses on one section of biology. But I dont want to do bioveteriany science because if i dont get into vet school after then i would of wasted 3 years as it hard to find jobs with that
0
reply
SilverstarDJ
  • PS Reviewer
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by haseebi82)
I took your advise and emailed few of the unis, and they said they won't accept audiology as a first degree for postgraduate study because it only focuses on one section of biology. But I dont want to do bioveteriany science because if i dont get into vet school after then i would of wasted 3 years as it hard to find jobs with that
Not sure hard it is to find jobs as a biovet, but I know some who have gone into research (a friend of mine went straight into a phD after her degree). I don't think there are many career paths aside from research, whether for biovet or the other general sciencey degrees - depends if you were happy with going into reseach if you didn't get into vet med or if you prefer the security of audiology.

If you really want to be a vet have you considered taking a gap year to resit any exams (if applicable)/improve your application and re-apply? That might be the cheapest/easiest option if you want to give it another shot or feel uncertain what degree to do. Not all unis accept resit students - but some will and I would advise emailing to find out which ones and under what circumstances.
0
reply
JamesManc
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by haseebi82)
I'm not sure what degree I should take, I wanted to become a vet but I know i won't get the alevels for it. I'm opting to do a Bsc Healthcare science( audiology) as I do find that course interesting aswell, but then again I still rather become a vet so should I do Bsc animal science course instead and apply for graduate entry for Veterinary medicine, how competitive is it. And is Audiology classed as a Biological science , would I be able to apply with that for graduate entry.
Yeah you'd be able to apply, grad vet isn't competitive as far as I'm aware (not many people do it). The main thing is finances, do you have lots of money/rich parents etc?
0
reply
Tarnia
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
Bioveterinary science is not the only degree that should qualify you for the graduate vet medicine program. Unless things have significantly changed, there were students from other degrees, including biochemistry, biophysics, general biology, animal biology/animal science, etc. in my class (granted this was in 2009).

However, I do agree with Silverstar that a gap year +/- resits is also something to consider.
0
reply
Nessie162
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
Hey
I am currently studying Zoology, and I'm hoping to apply to VetMed after graduation.
The thing is, I think I want to change my degree from Zoology to Joint Honours in Genetics and Immunology.
Does any of you know if I can apply for VetMed with a genetics degree? or is it too specific?

And of course, I do have a back up plan in case I don't get in
0
reply
SilverstarDJ
  • PS Reviewer
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by Nessie162)
Hey
I am currently studying Zoology, and I'm hoping to apply to VetMed after graduation.
The thing is, I think I want to change my degree from Zoology to Joint Honours in Genetics and Immunology.
Does any of you know if I can apply for VetMed with a genetics degree? or is it too specific?

And of course, I do have a back up plan in case I don't get in
I'd suggest emailing the unis individually - they'll be able to tell you from there
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cranfield University
    Cranfield Forensic MSc Programme Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 25 Apr '19
  • University of the Arts London
    Open day: MA Footwear and MA Fashion Artefact Postgraduate
    Thu, 25 Apr '19
  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (146)
38.42%
No - but I will (21)
5.53%
No - I don't want to (28)
7.37%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (185)
48.68%

Watched Threads

View All