Reynolds Number and Dynamic Viscosity Watch

Mutleybm1996
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Hi all,

I thought this would be transferrable to the Chemistry thread as the Physics thread doesn't seem very active these days.

I'm conducting an experiment into the Dynamic Viscosity of Glycerol and i'm trying to calculate the Reynolds number at temperatures from 25-80 degrees C. I'm aware that for Stoke's Flow to occur, the Reynolds number needs to be <1, however even using the standard results the Reynolds number is still 104, is this okay? Nothing on the internet seems to point me towards a decent conclusion.



Thank you,
please see attached a copy of my results
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natninja
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(Original post by Mutleybm1996)
Hi all,

I thought this would be transferrable to the Chemistry thread as the Physics thread doesn't seem very active these days.

I'm conducting an experiment into the Dynamic Viscosity of Glycerol and i'm trying to calculate the Reynolds number at temperatures from 25-80 degrees C. I'm aware that for Stoke's Flow to occur, the Reynolds number needs to be <1, however even using the standard results the Reynolds number is still 104, is this okay? Nothing on the internet seems to point me towards a decent conclusion.



Thank you,
please see attached a copy of my results
Generally errors above the order of magnitude are not Ok... What units are you using for glycerol density? the density should be units Kg/m^3. Do a units check and see if that changes your answer to being in the right range of order of magnitude. 104 is way too high for glycerol.
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Mutleybm1996
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(Original post by natninja)
Generally errors above the order of magnitude are not Ok... What units are you using for glycerol density? the density should be units Kg/m^3. Do a units check and see if that changes your answer to being in the right range of order of magnitude. 104 is way too high for glycerol.
sorry, it was a rough table for TSR, yes kg/m^3 are the units. I checked my answers by using this calculator:

http://www.pipeflowcalculations.com/reynolds/
and this one
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/re...ber-d_237.html


it led to the same answer
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natninja
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(Original post by Mutleybm1996)
sorry, it was a rough table for TSR, yes kg/m^3 are the units. I checked my answers by using this calculator:

http://www.pipeflowcalculations.com/reynolds/
and this one
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/re...ber-d_237.html


it led to the same answer
weird...
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