Is the gender gap in salaries because female graduates just have lower aspirations? Watch

SebMar
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Apparently, according to a recent survey by Tendence UK, male and female graduates have different wants from a career. The survey was pretty extensive (27 participants from 126 uni's) and found that male grads expect to be paid 12% more than their female counterparts!

Now, I imagine this will be divisive, as I am sure there is lingering discrimination from the previous generation, but aspiration does seem to (in the aggregate) play a part too.

Article: https://sturents.com/news/post/2014/...ectations/284/
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Smash Bandicoot
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Male disposability and cultural expectations of masculinity make quality employment a necessity for men both on a practical level (material needs) and social/personal level (self-respect and respect for others). Women having been lately objectified and oppressed pre-feminism do not have the same necessity and can if they so choose work within the traditionalist (one may say chauvinist, however) framework for women. That being said, most women who have reached graduate level will be relatively progressive and self-identify as at least feminist in the original sense of the word, therefore more likely to seek higher career aspirations on par with male graduates, and in some cases exceeding them.
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Okorange
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Yes its true. Women just don't have the same needs as men to have a high paid job. For men, having a good career with a good salary means more than to a woman. Its quite often talked about how professional women are having difficulty finding husbands because they don't want to date "down in terms of salary" and professional men are willing and able to date "down".
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buksie
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(Original post by Okorange)
Yes its true. Women just don't have the same needs as men to have a high paid job. For men, having a good career with a good salary means more than to a woman. Its quite often talked about how professional women are having difficulty finding husbands because they don't want to date "down in terms of salary" and professional men are willing and able to date "down".
I completely disagree.

Firstly, Women don't have the same needs as men to have a high paid job? For me, and every other female I know, having a good salary and career is very important. I would not do something that I loved to be paid peanuts. Have it as a hobby? Maybe. I am sure that a lot of other females would agree with me.

Secondly, professional women are having difficulty finding husbands because they won't "date down in terms of salary" and professional men are willing and able to date "down". What about men not willing to "date up"? Does it not make a lot of men feel less masculine to be with someone who earns more than them?
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lozasaurus99
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(Original post by SebMar)
Apparently, according to a recent survey by Tendence UK, male and female graduates have different wants from a career. The survey was pretty extensive (27 participants from 126 uni's) and found that male grads expect to be paid 12% more than their female counterparts!

Now, I imagine this will be divisive, as I am sure there is lingering discrimination from the previous generation, but aspiration does seem to (in the aggregate) play a part too.

Article: https://sturents.com/news/post/2014/...ectations/284/
Ridiculous sexist assumption

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Okorange
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(Original post by buksie)
I completely disagree.

Firstly, Women don't have the same needs as men to have a high paid job? For me, and every other female I know, having a good salary and career is very important. I would not do something that I loved to be paid peanuts. Have it as a hobby? Maybe. I am sure that a lot of other females would agree with me.

Secondly, professional women are having difficulty finding husbands because they won't "date down in terms of salary" and professional men are willing and able to date "down". What about men not willing to "date up"? Does it not make a lot of men feel less masculine to be with someone who earns more than them?
It does make some men feel less masculine if their wife makes more than them, which is why women have less desire to make more than their potential partners.

In sense you agree with what I said, you are just looking at it from a different view point.

I never said women don't want a high paying job, i said they don't have the same needs as men! very different things. If you want stats, instead of anecdotes, university degrees that often lead to a high salary are dominated by men including engineering, computer science, business and the higher paying a field is the more men are in it i.e. (investment banking, corporate law, some medical specialties)

My main point is that men get more benefits from having a higher paying job than women do. Take a quick look at entertainment and you'll see what I mean. When has a wealthy successful woman been portrayed as spending money to get her pick of men? Now do a role-reversal, how many wealthy and successful men spend money to get his pick of women?
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Smack
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(Original post by buksie)
Secondly, professional women are having difficulty finding husbands because they won't "date down in terms of salary" and professional men are willing and able to date "down". What about men not willing to "date up"? Does it not make a lot of men feel less masculine to be with someone who earns more than them?
Probably. But I think a bigger issue is that men typically have lower access to women who are "above" them than the vice versa.
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