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MrKlaus
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I was originally set on doing a degree in Electronic Engineering and heard that MEng would be the best way to be more employable as a graduate and a faster way of reaching a chartered status, however recently I was told that it is better to just do a BEng, work for 3 years and gain some experience and then to do a masters.

I'm not sure which path is right?
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sherace
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(Original post by MrKlaus)
I was originally set on doing a degree in Electronic Engineering and heard that MEng would be the best way to be more employable as a graduate and a faster way of reaching a chartered status, however recently I was told that it is better to just do a BEng, work for 3 years and gain some experience and then to do a masters.

I'm not sure which path is right?
Hey there! I don't do ElecEng, I do ChemEng, so I don't know much about the electronic engineering business. However, I do know that in Chemical Engineering, a MEng is very very important. Because every graduate has one, and most companies with graduate placements and jobs are looking for MEng candidates, BEng candidates are often disregarded unless they have quite a few years of experience. 1 more year at university is a better idea, than 3 more years outside then coming back into the uni life.

In all uni courses, you have the opportunity to put your study on hold for a year to do industry placements or go travelling. Many engineering students use that option, so that they can work on a site somewhere, and get some valuable experience. This then makes their final years easier (as they have a more practical knowledge of their discipline). Additionally, I believe that student finance only funds masters that are done as an undergraduate degree, not post graduate masters. So if you waited a few years to complete that masters, you would also have the pay that £9,000 out of your own pocket. However, if you did it as a straight 4 year undergraduate degree, you would be supported by a student finance loan!

I would suggest that you opt for the MEng route, it makes you much more viable! That extra year adds a lot of value!

Good Luck!
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Methman
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While we're on the subject. Why is a Meng more difficult than a Beng? Is it just more modules or a whole new level of difficulty?
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MrKlaus
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(Original post by sherace)
Hey there! I don't do ElecEng, I do ChemEng, so I don't know much about the electronic engineering business. However, I do know that in Chemical Engineering, a MEng is very very important. Because every graduate has one, and most companies with graduate placements and jobs are looking for MEng candidates, BEng candidates are often disregarded unless they have quite a few years of experience. 1 more year at university is a better idea, than 3 more years outside then coming back into the uni life.

In all uni courses, you have the opportunity to put your study on hold for a year to do industry placements or go travelling. Many engineering students use that option, so that they can work on a site somewhere, and get some valuable experience. This then makes their final years easier (as they have a more practical knowledge of their discipline). Additionally, I believe that student finance only funds masters that are done as an undergraduate degree, not post graduate masters. So if you waited a few years to complete that masters, you would also have the pay that £9,000 out of your own pocket. However, if you did it as a straight 4 year undergraduate degree, you would be supported by a student finance loan!

I would suggest that you opt for the MEng route, it makes you much more viable! That extra year adds a lot of value!

Good Luck!
If you do the MEng, would you then not have to do a masters after and then just work your way up the ladder through experience, or would you have to end up doing a masters anyway?
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Doones
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(Original post by MrKlaus)
If you do the MEng, would you then not have to do a masters after and then just work your way up the ladder through experience, or would you have to end up doing a masters anyway?
MEng is a Masters. It completes your academic requirement for accreditation.

http://www.imeche.org/membership/mem...c-requirements

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MrKlaus
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(Original post by jneill)
MEng is a Masters. It completes your academic requirement for accreditation.

http://www.imeche.org/membership/mem...c-requirements

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Isn't the MEng just an integrated masters not fully a masters?
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Doones
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(Original post by MrKlaus)
Isn't the MEng just an integrated masters not fully a masters?
Read my link. Yes an MEng is an integrated masters, but it fully meets the academic requirements. Assuming it is properly accredited. And as others have mentioned, it is covered by student finance whereas an MSc is not.

Also for IET Charter membership
http://www.theiet.org/membership/pro.../requirements/

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0le
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Its best if you just do a BEng and get a job, but a few companies will only look for an MEng so it really depends. My advice would be to start applying in your third year for jobs and if you get into any reputable companies, take the job and forget your degree, otherwise go for the MEng.

Of course, if you're enjoying your degree and doing well, you can continue to do an MEng too.

There really isn't a right or wrong answer, but just make sure that you know exactly what your goals are and that your career is something your thinking about even at this stage.

Electrical Engineering is very employable. I wouldn't worry about doing Mech instead, pick whatever you'd think you'd enjoy more. That is an absolute must.
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Like_A_G6
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(Original post by djpailo)
Its best if you just do a BEng and get a job, but a few companies will only look for an MEng so it really depends. My advice would be to start applying in your third year for jobs and if you get into any reputable companies, take the job and forget your degree, otherwise go for the MEng.

Of course, if you're enjoying your degree and doing well, you can continue to do an MEng too.

There really isn't a right or wrong answer, but just make sure that you know exactly what your goals are and that your career is something your thinking about even at this stage.

Electrical Engineering is very employable. I wouldn't worry about doing Mech instead, pick whatever you'd think you'd enjoy more. That is an absolute must.
Only reason I can see to do a BEng is if you want to go on to do a phD or persue a career outside engineering.

Most companies, if not every company, wants an MEng graduate. They want you to become a chartered engineer, and it's so much longer/more tedious to get this through a BEng.
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zidane07
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i have offer letters from bath for bsc honors computer science with placement year and b eng computer science in glasgow im confused if bsc will have the same value so im confused on which to choose
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Doones
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(Original post by zidane07)
i have offer letters from bath for bsc honors computer science with placement year and b eng computer science in glasgow im confused if bsc will have the same value so im confused on which to choose
The name of the award makes no difference. Pick the course* that most interests you, although a placement year is always a good bonus.

*Check the detailed course content, they won't be the same. Especially regarding Year 2 & 3 options.

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1234me
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No! - Do not do an MEng, it is a waste of money and a year you could be earning. I did one and regret it, many of my peers did just a BEng and are at the same level with the same career prospects as me. MEng is a money making scheme set up by the universities and engineering institutions (IMechE etc), it is very unlikley you will use any of the things your MEng will cover when you go into an engineering job, most engineers specialise in one thing, and thats normally all learned on the job anyway. A BEng is plenty enough of a foundation for almost all engineering jobs.
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jamess3
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Hi, The 'Master of Engineering' (MEng) degree is a Masters degree in the field of engineering and the Master of Science (MSc) is a Masters degree in the field of Science. Yes the MEng is an integrated Masters degree and is worth 480 credits. The 4th year of the MEng (The masters year) is 120 credits at level 7. Let me explain the process of an integrated Masters degree below. Each year is worth 120 credits and the awards are given as:

Level 4 = Certificate of higher education (120 credits)
Level 5 = Diploma of higher education (240 credits)
Level 6 = Ordinary degree (300 credits)
Level 6 = Honours degree i.e BEng (Hons) at 360 credits
Level 7 = Masters level (480 credits)

The MEng degree combines an undergraduate degree with postgraduate study. If you do an MEng you will get one degree out of it, not a BEng plus an MSc separately for example.

The 4th year of the MEng (Masters postgraduate year) involves studying 120 credits at level 7, where as if you were to do an MSc separately you will study 180 credits at level 7. The MSc is slightly longer than an MEng level 7 masters year. So therefore the MEng is not exactly equivalent to an MSc qualification but having said that the MEng is still a Masters degree as the title suggests 'Master of Engineering'

The important thing to remember here is that the MEng and MSc degrees are both the same academic level, level 7! The MEng is not a level 6 qualification. The MEng degree is a Masters degree but in the field of Engineering.

Important points:

If you did a Master of Science (MSc) in Aeronautical Engineering then your Masters would be in the field of Science, whereby the main element of this would be a research dissertation.

If you did a Master of Engineering (MEng) in Aeronautical Engineering then your Masters would be in the field of Engineering, whereby the main element would be a major team or individual project, more practical based, less research as this is engineering. Makes sense?

The main differences really between an MSc and an MEng is the dissertation/project. These will be very different to each other.
Any other modules/exams you do will normally be the same for both MEng and MSc at level 7.

If you want to be an Engineer I would do the MEng as it will show to an employer that you are more practical based within the degree. After all Engineering is practical! The MSc is normally better for doing a research based career in engineering. Thats what I feel.

The MSc is a standalone Masters which is done separately after a Bachelors degree which must have Honours.

The choice is up to you. The MEng and MSc degrees are fantastic degrees.

If you integrated from a BEng (Hons) degree to an MEng degree you would get full student funding for the final Masters year, so you would get full funding towards living costs where as the MSc does not allow this. I think you can get MSc funding for tuition fees now but this does not include living costs. So this is a big factor to consider.

You can only transfer to the MEng once you have demonstrated excellent academic ability during the Bachelors levels.

The grading also work differently with an MSc. The MEng is normally graded using an undergraduate marking system, ie 1st, 2:1, 2:2 etc and the MSc is graded using Distinction, Merit etc. This is because the MEng is still an undergraduate degree, but remember the MEng is a degree that was integrated from a Bachelors level to Masters level. I know it is a bit confusing. The term undergraduate means you havent graduated yet with a degree, so the MEng will be your first graduation (because you integrated) makes sense doesnt it? Where as an MSc is a postgraduate because you have already graduated with a Bachelors and are doing a Masters separately. Hope this is making sense.

I have just graduated with a MEng in Aeronautical Engineering with a 2:1, which I am very proud of.

Just got for it !! If you cannot do the MSc for financial reasons and want to have a Masters level degree then do the MEng!!!

GOOD LUCK!
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Duncan2012
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(Original post by jamess3)
The MEng degree combines an undergraduate degree with postgraduate study.
...
If you did a Master of Science (MSc) in Aeronautical Engineering then your Masters would be in the field of Science, whereby the main element of this would be a research dissertation.
...
The main differences really between an MSc and an MEng is the dissertation/project. These will be very different to each other. Any other modules/exams you do will normally be the same for both MEng and MSc at level 7.
...
If you want to be an Engineer I would do the MEng as it will show to an employer that you are more practical based within the degree. After all Engineering is practical! The MSc is normally better for doing a research based career in engineering. Thats what I feel.
...
You can only transfer to the MEng once you have demonstrated excellent academic ability during the Bachelors levels.
Broadly right, a couple of small points:

An MEng is not "an undergraduate degree with postgraduate study". It's an undergraduate degree, it's not 'postgraduate' anything.

An MSc in Robotics wouldn't really be called 'an MSc in the field of science'. It's in robotics. A research project typically makes up about a third of an MSc.

MSc exams would normally be more advanced/specialised than MEng. They build on the knowledge you're expected to have already.

You talk about 'integrating' from BEng to MEng, although I suspect you mean transferring.

You would typically be able to transfer between BEng and MEng up to the end of second year, as the third year of each course will be different.

Well done on your result
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jamess3
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What i meant that is an MEng is an extended Bachelor's degree to Masters level, but yes.Thanks
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jamess3
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I know to be fair when people talk about MEng it is a bit confusing to talk about where as an MSc is straight forward to explain
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BFG9000
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(Original post by MrKlaus)
I was originally set on doing a degree in Electronic Engineering and heard that MEng would be the best way to be more employable as a graduate and a faster way of reaching a chartered status, however recently I was told that it is better to just do a BEng, work for 3 years and gain some experience and then to do a masters.

I'm not sure which path is right?
I hire Beng and Meng staff, people that must be chartered are not in junior roles, no matter which way you go, you will be hired as some of a trainee. You can always do Masters later on and most likely for free, we pay for two of our engineers' MSc. The deal is that they have to stay 5 years after graduation, decent pay, good prospects...
The sandwich is a good way to go, or try to build something relevant in your 4th year.
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BFG9000
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(Original post by jamess3)
I know to be fair when people talk about MEng it is a bit confusing to talk about where as an MSc is straight forward to explain
Well, people who need to know, do know.
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jamess3
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(Original post by BFG9000)
Well, people who need to know, do know.
I Just meant that MEng maybe harder to explain, it wasn't a negative. MEng is a Bachelor's degree with 120 credits at Masters level combined to it. The end result is a Master of Engineering degree. The MEng IS NOT a Bachelor's degree. It is a master's level qualification. Good luck to everyone in their studies.
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Doones
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(Original post by jamess3)
I Just meant that MEng maybe harder to explain, it wasn't a negative. MEng is a Bachelor's degree with 120 credits at Masters level combined to it. The end result is a Master of Engineering degree. The MEng IS NOT a Bachelor's degree. It is a master's level qualification. Good luck to everyone in their studies.
This was already established in the thread 4 years ago...

I'm closing it now.
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