Worried About Biomedical Science Degree. Help? Watch

Eggin
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I am currently on a gap year and applying for University starting next September after just finishing my A levels. I think from my experience during A levels the subject I have most interest in is human/molecular biology and parts of chemistry. So I'm looking at mainly Biomedical science and biochemistry (which I could switch between in my first year). However I wouldn't say at all that I have a passion for this and I always hear people say follow your passion/dreams and truth is I don't have one. I never really enjoyed labs during my A levels because it was usually assessed and i panicked about not knowing what to do, although I still managed to do well thanks to resits. Because of this I have no idea how I will find practicals at University and therefore working in a lab as a career seems doubtful. This gets me worried as a large number of careers after biomedical science go into labs. I sometimes think I may do better in a job in Business/management/finance but I don't find their degrees as appealing. I don't know what I'm asking on here exactly I just felt like I needed to get my thoughts out there. Some questions I do have though:

Are there other good jobs out there which are not lab based I could get with a Biomedical Science degree? Is biomedical science a good degree and not just full of failed medics? Do I need to worry about labs in the first place? Will I struggle with the workload if I'm not passionate about my degree?

I did do well in my A levels.

I don't know what else I could do I have looked at every degree out there and I find them all less interesting but I still worry a lot about this. I don't think I'm passionate enough for this to do medicine. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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username1221160
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I don't think you need to be passionate per se, but you do need to like the subject enough to be able to sit down and read through a textbook without feeling like you want to give up on life.

I'm currently a cell/molecular biology student and my housemate is a biomedical student. Labs play are central to our degrees. We have them frequently and they can last up to 6 hours. The majority of the none-exam assessments are related to our labs, with the odd essay thrown in for for variety.

Have you looked into ecology/environmental science/earth science/geography degrees? They contain a mixture of chemistry/biology but will involve less labs and have the added bonus of field trips. While our lecturers lock us in the teaching lab, the ecology students are pissing off to Thailand.

While many people with biomedical science degrees do go on to work in related fields, there is nothing to stop you from just using your degree like any other generic degree to get to a job.
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Eggin
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(Original post by Quantex)
I don't think you need to be passionate per se, but you do need to like the subject enough to be able to sit down and read through a textbook without feeling like you want to give up on life.

I'm currently a cell/molecular biology student and my housemate is a biomedical student. Labs play are central to our degrees. We have them frequently and they can last up to 6 hours. The majority of the none-exam assessments are related to our labs, with the odd essay thrown in for for variety.

Have you looked into ecology/environmental science/earth science/geography degrees? They contain a mixture of chemistry/biology but will involve less labs and have the added bonus of field trips. While our lecturers lock us in the teaching lab, the ecology students are pissing off to Thailand.

While many people with biomedical science degrees do go on to work in related fields, there is nothing to stop you from just using your degree like any other generic degree to get to a job.
Hi, thanks for your reply.
I have looked into labs and it sounds like first year is done in groups and with a lot of support? So I think (hoping) I may just be worrying too much. I have considered the other degrees you mentioned and I just don't find them as interesting, never really enjoyed physical geography or the environment.
I do like to think that worst case I can just find a job in a different area of work after graduating but worry I may not be as appealing as other students with more related degrees and also worry that just a Bsc is not seen as enough in the job market nowadays. (and funding post-grad degrees seems very difficult).
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laurencrabby
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From my experiences, if you're not passionate, don't bother.

I, like you, did well in A Levels. And GCSE. My Sixth Form pretty much convinced me "Lauren you're clever, you'll go onto higher education, get that first and a fabulous job."

Then there's the question of what to study. Ooh I quite liked my Extended Project on malaria. I'll do Biomed.

A decision I now regret massively.

I changed when starting Biomed at UWE to their Healthcare Science program- three years with three summer holidays given up to local unpaid NHS laboratory placements. Thought great, I'll come out as a registered Biomedical Scientist and get a lab job in Plymouth.

It was horrible! Lab work is ultra repetitive and I'm very much a people person- I discovered this more when I dropped last summer's placement to go work for First Great Western selling train tickets and absolutely loved it. I worked pretty much on a production chain like a robot. Plus I felt so awful being confined to this clinical place. Not to mention the working hours were terrible, my colleagues weren't people persons whatsoever (probably why they enjoy their jobs) so it was boring as hell.

So now I'm stuck in my final year back on classic biomed reading in ultra depth into something I couldn't care less about. I'm not passionate about science at all, I never was. Although I was utterly convinced that I was going to university because it would be "The best days of my life" etc.

Take what I'm spending my day doing today- researching about the role of cellular pathology in the investigation of lymphoma. I've got to read a relentless amount of journals, chose those that are credible and relevant to my writing to reference, write up 1500 words that will take me hours and hours... and I'll probably only get 60%. Uni isn't like A levels at all. There's no such thing as 100% and there's no exam mark schemes or anything.

So I'm counting down the days left of my BMS degree. Wouldn't recommend it to anyone. And look at the debt. Get some work experience in lots of different fields (I've had around 6 jobs to date) and figure out from that what you'd like to do. You don't have to go to uni. An arsenal of work experience is sufficient for a lot of "work your way up" jobs.
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kokafor92
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(Original post by Eggin)
I am currently on a gap year and applying for University starting next September after just finishing my A levels. I think from my experience during A levels the subject I have most interest in is human/molecular biology and parts of chemistry. So I'm looking at mainly Biomedical science and biochemistry (which I could switch between in my first year). However I wouldn't say at all that I have a passion for this and I always hear people say follow your passion/dreams and truth is I don't have one. I never really enjoyed labs during my A levels because it was usually assessed and i panicked about not knowing what to do, although I still managed to do well thanks to resits. Because of this I have no idea how I will find practicals at University and therefore working in a lab as a career seems doubtful. This gets me worried as a large number of careers after biomedical science go into labs. I sometimes think I may do better in a job in Business/management/finance but I don't find their degrees as appealing. I don't know what I'm asking on here exactly I just felt like I needed to get my thoughts out there. Some questions I do have though:

Are there other good jobs out there which are not lab based I could get with a Biomedical Science degree? Is biomedical science a good degree and not just full of failed medics? Do I need to worry about labs in the first place? Will I struggle with the workload if I'm not passionate about my degree?

I did do well in my A levels.

I don't know what else I could do I have looked at every degree out there and I find them all less interesting but I still worry a lot about this. I don't think I'm passionate enough for this to do medicine. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Career prospects include:

• Speech and language specialist. Speech therapist
• Public health
• orthopist
• Physiotherapy
• Clinical psychology
• Clinical pharmacy
• Physician Associate
• Clinical scientist: audiologist, respiratory physiologist, clinical cardiac physiologist

also check out this site: https://biosciencecareers.wordpress.com

hope this helps someone.
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