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    (Original post by James_W)
    Erm.. nope. I'm sorry - but you really should stop feeding people false information that they will take on board, it's not fair on them.

    Basically any degree from Oxbridge or LSE holds you in very good stead - and that means ANY! Geography, History, Maths, Psychology, anything! Then any Economics/Business/Maths/Science degrees from other top universities (Warwick, Bristol, Nottingham, Imperial) will hold you in very good stead too.

    Then you have the aforementioned type of degrees from other institutions, where a 1st or 2:1 will hold you in good stead (not very good stead). Note that all this degree malarky counts for nothing if you can't fit into the company culture, and haven't got the right personality for the job.

    TheWolf - if you think I'm wrong, I can give you group examples (told to me by Open Day speakers) and individual examples (people that I know that are now traders, and their degrees).
    Very true - when I said "in the average trading room you will find graduates in English, history, science, engineering, computing, maths, economics" I really meant it - I have actually met people with all those degrees at investment banks (with the possible exceptoin of English, am a bit hazy on that one). I met an analyst for CSFB who read History at Edinburgh (shock horror) and wasn't even hugely academic (spent most of his time playing rugby apparently). I also spoke to an interviewer for one of the biggest city banks who said he deliberately looked for people with a variety of interests.
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    (Original post by Illuvatar)
    you idiot - any degree from oxbridge or lse? are you crazy? subjects like anthropology in lse is greatly despised by esp investment banks (tradiing positions) if not all investment banks - please stop talking rubbish
    exactly - degrees that are more mathematical + more competitive to get into obviously gives you a better chance esp of being a trader than things such as 'environment' at lse, common sense
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    I am confused ... are we talking about the investment banking sector or an investment banker specifically?
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    (Original post by shiny)
    I am confused ... are we talking about the investment banking sector or an investment banker specifically?
    It really doesn't help that these terms are so imprecise does it . Took me a week to look at all the millions of bits a bank has...and I never once heard the word investment banker in a month at one.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    It really doesn't help that these terms are so imprecise does it . Took me a week to look at all the millions of bits a bank has...and I never once heard the word investment banker in a month at one.
    Indeed it is all very confusing.
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    ANY from LSE? :confused:
    Yep, read my post again.
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    (Original post by Illuvatar)
    you idiot - any degree from oxbridge or lse? are you crazy? subjects like anthropology in lse is greatly despised by esp investment banks (tradiing positions) if not all investment banks - please stop talking rubbish
    Why would they dispise a degree in anthropology?? You still have to be trained to do your job and as most degrees at Ox/Cam are non-vocational they don't care. They want bright people (as most Ox/Cam graduates are) I know this beacuse my mother interviews prospective trainees. They aren't really bothered what your degree is in if its a first or 2:1. On Friday a guy with a classics degree from Cambridge was interviewed and has a strong chance of getting the job. You should do a subject you are interested in, after all what sounds better "I chose Economics because I wanted to make loads of money working in the city" or "I chose Arch+Anth because it interests me and I feel that it opens many doors to post graduate training"??
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    (Original post by Illuvatar)
    you idiot - any degree from oxbridge or lse? are you crazy? subjects like anthropology in lse is greatly despised by esp investment banks (tradiing positions) if not all investment banks - please stop talking rubbish
    I'm an idiot? Thanks for your words of wisdom.

    Who said that subjects like Anthropology are despised? If you have a degree in that, plus all the other qualities that investment banks are looking for - you've got a very good chance of making it. The sheer fact that you've got into Oxbridge speaks volumes. Lets look at it this way.. an interesting, vibrant and ambitious 'Anthropologist' from Cambridge would be better than an uninteresting dullard that lacks social skills (the type that feels the need to call strangers 'idiots' on messageboards haha). Of course, they would need to be up to scratch with numerical skills required for the job and still need that extra special quality that an Economist may not need - but they aren't despised and I stand by my statement.
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    (Original post by James_W)
    I'm an idiot? Thanks for your words of wisdom.

    Who said that subjects like Anthropology are despised? If you have a degree in that, plus all the other qualities that investment banks are looking for - you've got a very good chance of making it. The sheer fact that you've got into Oxbridge speaks volumes. Lets look at it this way.. an interesting, vibrant and ambitious 'Anthropologist' from Cambridge would be better than an uninteresting dullard that lacks social skills (the type that feels the need to call strangers 'idiots' on messageboards haha). Of course, they would need to be up to scratch with numerical skills required for the job and still need that extra special quality that an Economist may not need - but they aren't despised and I stand by my statement.
    I can't help but feel that Illuvitar is the one looking like an idiot, as some one who is related to someone who employs these kind of people I can tell you that what James says makes a lot more sense. They don't only care about how competitive your course is, it is not as though we all apply to get on the most competitive course because "it will look better" is it??
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    You need to provide evidence that you are bright, hard working, and posess a range of skills. One way of doing this is a good Economics degree. But there are countless others. You can do a non-numerate degree, and still provide plenty of evidence of mathematical ability through A-levels (Further Maths A-level will take you way beyond what most bankers require) or any other credible activities.
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    Degrees really don't matter in the real world as much as they are made out to be.. it's not the b-all and end all. I can't stress that enough - if people on here don't want to listen to what I have say, so be it.. I'm just trying to point people in the right direction and show people where they could be wrong, not trying to make any enemies in doing so - I'm not that sort of guy. I just speak to my relations that are in Investment Banking about it, and try and share that knowledge if I can - if that makes me an idiot, so be it.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    You need to provide evidence that you are bright, hard working, and posess a range of skills. One way of doing this is a good Economics degree. But there are countless others. You can do a non-numerate degree, and still provide plenty of evidence of mathematical ability through A-levels (Further Maths A-level will take you way beyond what most bankers require) or any other credible activities.
    Regarding the maths, if you are looking at accountancy part of banking you need nothing more than to be good arithmatic. It is a myth that you need to be good at maths to be an accountant. Quote from one accountant my mother worked with "You can have 51% of the shares and your partner can have the other half." True story!! Being bright is probably the most useful "qualification" you can have...
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    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    You should do a subject you are interested in, after all what sounds better "I chose Economics because I wanted to make loads of money working in the city" or "I chose Arch+Anth because it interests me and I feel that it opens many doors to post graduate training"??
    Very good point.
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    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    Regarding the maths, if you are looking at accountancy part of banking you need nothing more than to be good arithmatic. It is a myth that you need to be good at maths to be an accountant. Quote from one accountant my mother worked with "You can have 51% of the shares and your partner can have the other half." True story!! Being bright is probably the most useful "qualification" you can have...
    My mum is a fellow of the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants and her highest Maths qualification is an O-level.
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    One of my cousins got a History degree (3rd lol) from City University in 2000, and now works as a trader at JPM (I think it's JPM) earning mega bucks. If that's not a kick up academia's arse, I don't know what is
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    (Original post by James_W)
    One of my cousins got a History degree (3rd lol) from City University in 2000, and now works as a trader at JPM (I think it's JPM) earning mega bucks. If that's not a kick up academia's arse, I don't know what is
    I've heard this kind of thing lots of times - you need drive and ambition, not necessarily a 1st from Trinity.
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    There is a huge amount of false information on this thread..some even from James_W (sorry)..sorry for the long post too..

    Entry:
    Investment Banks (IBs) advertise themselves as meritocratic environments where diversity is seen as a great asset. Entry through the 'back door' is not so common any more - if you don't get past HR/department selectors, you (probably) won't get there.
    Recruitment is fabulously competitive..in context - far, far higher than LSE acceptance ratios..forget it without a strong pre-degree background and a 2:1/1st from a well-respected University..
    While recruitment from classic "target schools" is still strong, an emerging (post-80s) realisation within IBs is that "diversity" should extend to the Universities from which they recruit - they no longer want a 'graduate class' exclusively of Oxbridge/LSE graduates.

    Degree discipline:
    Again, sourcing from diverse backgrounds is encouraged for positions within different areas of the organisation. As long as a genuine interest is displayed/detected, e.g. a history graduate with a passion for, say, either IT or equities may be hired to work in the IT or Equities Markets/Research area.

    However, it must be said that quantitative disciplines are a requirement for certain roles..swaps/derivatives structuring/trading springs to mind. It is not uncommon for PhDs in Physics etc. to 'populate' a large portion of these 'desks'.
    --

    And last of all..
    Ostentatious displays of wealth and/or arrogance are frowned upon. If you can't work effectively with others, are socially inept or are just interested in money (though an interest in profit helps if you work in a revenue-generating area of the business) - you may not pass the assessment process and you won't last very long once there.
    --

    Other than that, if you have determination and a real interest in the business, you will go far..
    Good luck!
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    (Original post by dotacdotuk)
    However, it must be said that quantitative disciplines are a requirement for certain roles..swaps/derivatives structuring/trading springs to mind. It is not uncommon for PhDs in Physics etc. to 'populate' a large portion of these 'desks'.
    Hmm ... '87 stock market crash springs to mind.
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    [QUOTE

    And last of all..
    Ostentatious displays of wealth and/or arrogance are frowned upon. If you can't work effectively with others, are socially inept or are just interested in money (though an interest in profit helps if you work in a revenue-generating area of the business) - you may not pass the assessment process and you won't last very long once there.
    --

    Other than that, if you have determination and a real interest in the business, you will go far..
    Good luck![/QUOTE]

    Hmm, all that is very well apart from the arrogance bit.
    According to insiders, the trading floor is full of machismo.
    Sure enough, traders don't come into work with large diamond rings and all that bling but they do come in with inflated heads, and on good days they leave with even bigger heads.
    Well, when money is floating around in such volumes, it makes people go crazy. Those who think they're immune to swearing should steer well clear of the trading floor as that bug has no antidote.
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    (Original post by theECONOMIST)

    Hmm, all that is very well apart from the arrogance bit.
    According to insiders, the trading floor is full of machismo.
    Sure enough, traders don't come into work with large diamond rings and all that bling but they do come in with inflated heads, and on good days they leave with even bigger heads.
    Well, when money is floating around in such volumes, it makes people go crazy. Those who think they're immune to swearing should steer well clear of the trading floor as that bug has no antidote.
    yes... I agree the city is a great place to make money... but also one of the best places to loose it.
    Jobs in banking only suit certain types of people in the same way some people are suited to being a doctor exc.
 
 
 
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