Should I use my notes made in class, or should I use the textbook?

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Ash8991
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Hi, I cannot decide on which method, either revising using the notes I've made in class or the notes I could make using the textbook, is the best one to use On the one hand, using the notes I made in class is less time consuming, however, on the other hand, if I were to make notes straight from the textbook, at least then I would be getting everything that I need to know down, whereas in class, I wouldn't be able to get every single detail down. So what would you guys recommend? The less time consuming but the less detail way, or the more time consuming but the more detail way?

Thanks

P.S: I'm doing 5 AS levels (Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Maths and Further Maths); I don't really want to incorporate both techniques (Reinforcing the notes I've made in class using the textbook) because what we get taught in class isn't in the same order as it's taught in the textbook, so it's a little bit too confusing :/
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Kaiju
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Both.
/thread

Seriously, this is the best way.
If you don't want to 50/50 it do most the faster way and then double-check using textbooks after.
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Azurefeline
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(Original post by Ash8991)
Hi, I cannot decide on which method, either revising using the notes I've made in class or the notes I could make using the textbook, is the best one to use On the one hand, using the notes I made in class is less time consuming, however, on the other hand, if I were to make notes straight from the textbook, at least then I would be getting everything that I need to know down, whereas in class, I wouldn't be able to get every single detail down. So what would you guys recommend? The less time consuming but the less detail way, or the more time consuming but the more detail way?

Thanks

P.S: I'm doing 5 AS levels (Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Maths and Further Maths); I don't really want to incorporate both techniques (Reinforcing the notes I've made in class using the textbook) because what we get taught in class isn't in the same order as it's taught in the textbook, so it's a little bit too confusing :/
Make your own revision notes, by combining the two.
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flutterby-x303
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This is the way I revise and in my opinion it's the best way. In class write notes in rough. Then when you get home use all the text books you have as well as the rough notes made in class to make neat notes that you can build up into a revision folder. This way not only is it neat but you have information from as many sources as possible.


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Ash8991
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I suppose that reinforcing the notes I've made in class is the best way to go, thanks!
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7253567
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For maths, class notes are generally sufficient. For others I would suggest making notes in advance and then just listen to the teacher during and add anything that your notes are missing. Having a copy of the specification is also useful as I find that teachers often tend to start rambling on about unrelated things.


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Rabbit2
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IMHO, what you want to study, is what you are going to be asked on the test(s). In the majority of the courses i've taken, the tests were made up by the instructor. This excludes 'large scale' freshman courses where there are 3 or 4 instructors teaching "Freshman English" for example, and all instructors have to use the same 'departmental' exams. At more advanced levels, you normally have only one instructor teaching a course (perhaps with several sections - but still the same instructor). When i was an undergraduate, i used to study like crazy, and learn all sorts of stuff. Unfortunately, most of it was never on any test i ever took. This is a total waste of time. I realized when i was working on my masters degree [electrical engineering] that if i continued in that vein, i wasn't going to 'make it' - i.e. i would end up without a degree (other than the bachelors that i'd started grad school with). I started keeping track of how long the instructor spent covering each topic. Most topics are covered 7 or 8 times in each grading period. Each time the topic was mentioned, i kept track of how much 'work' the instructor did - did they just talk about it?, draw/write on the board, hand out prepared sheets to the students (prepared ahead of time), or use an overhead projector? Each of these is more work. I would multiply the time spent on each presentation by the 'work factor' number that was determined by the amount of work done. As an example, say for 'topic A', the instructor just talked about it for 5 minutes, then drew on the board for 6 minutes. Suppose that i had previously decided that 'just talking' was worth a 1 to a 3 in work factor - depending upon the complexity of the talk, and that 'drawing on the board' was worth a 4 to a 6. If both the talk and drawing work were of 'medium complexity', then i would multiply the first 5 minutes by a 2 (medium) and the drawing 6 minutes by 5 (also medium). After the drawing, the instructor went on to another topic. Adding the two together - [5 x 2 = 10] + [6 x 5 = 30] = 40. So the score for 'topic A' was 40 for that day. I would do this for every time 'topic A' was mentioned in class.

Just before the next exam, i would add up all the total scores for 'topic A', 'topic B', 'topic C', .... and arrange them in numerically decreasing order - so the topic with the biggest total score would be at the top of the list. The next highest would be second, etc. Then i would decide how many topics i had to 'cover' for the exam. If an hour was allocated for the exam [about typical for graduate school], and it took about 15 minutes to remember the equations & do the calculations for each problem, then there was time enough for 4 to 5 problems. Taking into account that the instructor might 'skip' one of the topics, i would figure that i needed to 'cover' 7 or 8 topics to be safe. I would then make up problems that were very similar to what i had seen on problems and examples done in class [here, {in the US} homework is not usually assigned in graduate school - you are expected to be adults & do what you have to do to get the information into your head yourself. In the case of an undergraduate course, where homework IS assigned, i would include all homework problems relating to that specific topic, and come up with a problem that included absolutely everything you had ever been asked about it.

The first time i did this, on a final exam in my master's program [electrical engineering], i hit the guy 100%. I had EVERY question that was on the final exam - and NO extras [i hadn't thought to provide a few extra as a safety factor that time]. It was an hour exam, and i finished the calculations in 13 minutes. I then checked my work three times. My criteria is that i have to check my work 3 times without finding an error. The first time through i found 3 errors. I corrected them and started checking again. Three more passes through the problems and i failed to find another error. At this point i was ready to had the exam in. I was 22 minutes into the hour exam. I waited until someone else had handed their exam in [so as not to be first], turned mine in, and left. The two other guys in my study group were amazed [i waited on the pavement outside for them - they took the full hour + then some]. The instructor came out after a while, and asked how we had done. Me mates said: "We don't know how we did, but he [pointing at me], did GREAT"!!! The instructor said: "Why is that"? "Show him Rabbit..." So i did. The instructor said: "BUT.... I just typed ours up this afternoon (Thursday). Me mates said: "He had that [pointing at my 'sample' exam] last Sunday at our study session"!! I said: "Well, you should have given me a ring Dr. XXXXX, i could have emailed that over to you and saved you the trouble"!! He was amazed. I repeated the trick for the remaining 4 courses that i had to complete for my master's degree (for both the mid-term and the final exam, since those are the only two exams you get here in graduate school). The WORST i ever did, was 72% of the questions on the actual exam appeared on my 'sample' exam. I had several cases where 100% of the questions on the actual exam appeared on my 'sample'.

I would recommend this technique for 'revising'. You may look at other things too, but you should make SURE that you've got all the topics covered that show up in topic list, based upon the time your instructor spends covering the material. Remember that there is a 'pucker factor' - some people tend to panic when facing a test - so make sure you know the predicted questions "cold", without any hesitation. Also, be sure to check your work!!!!!! Best of luck!!
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