Should euthanasia be legalised in the UK?

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Poll: Should euthanisia be legalised in the UK?
Yes (75)
78.13%
No (21)
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llanber
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#1
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What are your opinions surrounding euthanasia, should it be legalised in the UK?
Considering the legal and moral aspects of the issue.

If so, why?

If you are against it, how come?


It would be great if you could reply- I'm writing a dissertation on euthanasia so I would love to hear others opinions!

Thank you
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Rakas21
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No.

It is tantamount to the state encouraging suicide and the potential for abuse is extreme.

My mother has mental health issues but has in the past put on enough of an act that she was allowed to go home simply to harm again. Imagine if this was the case with euthanasia.

Euthanasia is liberalism too far.
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SnoochToTheBooch
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Yes. I don't care if it'd occasionally get abused, I'm sick of the actions of a few spoiling something for everyone else in this country. I want the option of a way out if the **** gets too thick, eg. I've witnessed what a cancer death is like and it's no way to go. You wouldn't let a dog suffer like that.
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the bear
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it is an appalling idea. although in theory it sounds humane and decent, in practice it would inevitable lead to pressure on the frail and elderly to throw in the towel so the rellies can cash in on the inheritance.
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Everglow
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With the correct safeguarding, like that proposed in Lord Falconer's Assisted Dying Bill, I think euthanasia is absolutely an option we should be allowing people. Why should the state have the right to tell people they can't end their lives on their own terms?

(Original post by the bear)
it is an appalling idea. although in theory it sounds humane and decent, in practice it would inevitable lead to pressure on the frail and elderly to throw in the towel so the rellies can cash in on the inheritance.
This kind of scenario would not be acceptable under the Assisted Dying Bill. Several medical doctors would have to approve of any request for euthanasia and they would judge on factors like terminal illness.
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Drewski
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My grandmother is currently riddled with dementia, she doesn't know any of her children, grandchildren or great grandchildren, she doesn't know who she is, she no longer eats, she's broken her hip and her arm so is no longer mobile. She is mostly deaf and partially sighted.

She is 100% reliant on assistance to live.

Vets would long ago have urged someone with a pet in that condition to be put to sleep in an humane, peaceful way. Why shouldn't humans have the same dignity? Why should my grandmother be forced to rot and decay away, dying slowly and agonisingly through starvation while her brain destroys all semblance of who she is?
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the bear
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(Original post by Reluire)
With the correct safeguarding, like that proposed in Lord Falconer's Assisted Dying Bill, I think euthanasia is absolutely an option we should be allowing people. Why should the state have the right to tell people they can't end their lives on their own terms?



This kind of scenario would not be acceptable under the Assisted Dying Bill. Several medical doctors would have to approve of any request for euthanasia and they would judge on factors like terminal illness.
you must be very naive to think that doctors are not going to follow the trends of society.
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Everglow
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(Original post by Drewski)
My grandmother is currently riddled with dementia, she doesn't know any of her children, grandchildren or great grandchildren, she doesn't know who she is, she no longer eats, she's broken her hip and her arm so is no longer mobile. She is mostly deaf and partially sighted.

She is 100% reliant on assistance to live.

Vets would long ago have urged someone with a pet in that condition to be put to sleep in an humane, peaceful way. Why shouldn't humans have the same dignity? Why should my grandmother be forced to rot and decay away, dying slowly and agonisingly through starvation while her brain destroys all semblance of who she is?
I couldn't agree more.

(Original post by the bear)
you must be very naive to think that doctors are not going to follow the trends of society.
Or perhaps you are overly cynical? Doctors would be scrutinised extremely heavily with this kind of bill. It wouldn't just be a quick yes or no approval by any means.
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the bear
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(Original post by Drewski)
My grandmother is currently riddled with dementia, she doesn't know any of her children, grandchildren or great grandchildren, she doesn't know who she is, she no longer eats, she's broken her hip and her arm so is no longer mobile. She is mostly deaf and partially sighted.

She is 100% reliant on assistance to live.

Vets would long ago have urged someone with a pet in that condition to be put to sleep in an humane, peaceful way. Why shouldn't humans have the same dignity? Why should my grandmother be forced to rot and decay away, dying slowly and agonisingly through starvation while her brain destroys all semblance of who she is?
I am sorry to hear about your relative's poor health. It would be a slippery slope if euthanasia were allowed for dementia.... then cancer.... then learning difficulties... there would be no logical endpoint.
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the bear
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(Original post by Reluire)
I couldn't agree more.



Or perhaps you are overly cynical? Doctors would be scrutinised extremely heavily with this kind of bill. It wouldn't just be a quick yes or no approval by any means.
you only have to see what happened with the legalisation of abortion. now we have abortion on demand in all but name. exactly the same would happen with euthanasia... which is like abortion for adults
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felamaslen
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(Original post by Rakas21)
No.

It is tantamount to the state encouraging suicide and the potential for abuse is extreme.

My mother has mental health issues but has in the past put on enough of an act that she was allowed to go home simply to harm again. Imagine if this was the case with euthanasia.

Euthanasia is liberalism too far.
What about cases involving sane people who want to end their own suffering, but are not able to without assistance?
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felamaslen
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(Original post by the bear)
you only have to see what happened with the legalisation of abortion. now we have abortion on demand in all but name. exactly the same would happen with euthanasia... which is like abortion for adults
It is not directly comparable. Abortion involves another life - I oppose late-term abortions, and even mid-term ones. Euthanasia is the exercise of one's rights over one's own self, and only one's own self.
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Everglow
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(Original post by the bear)
I am sorry to hear about your relative's poor health. It would be a slippery slope if euthanasia were allowed for dementia.... then cancer.... then learning difficulties... there would be no logical endpoint.
That's a very fallacious argument that doesn't hold any real weight. You don't know that it would eventually 'slip' to allowing people with learning difficulties. And I'm almost 100% positive it never would.
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the bear
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(Original post by felamaslen)
It is not directly comparable. Abortion involves another life - I oppose late-term abortions, and even mid-term ones. Euthanasia is the exercise of one's rights over one's own self, and only one's own self.
it is not going to be about Auntie Daisy making a decision... it will be pressure from her greedy relatives who have their eye on her valuable estate.
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felamaslen
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(Original post by the bear)
it is not going to be about Auntie Daisy making a decision... it will be pressure from her greedy relatives who have their eye on her valuable estate.
That is a legitimate practical argument against euthanasia, but I still think we can do better than simply ban all euthanasia.
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Drewski
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(Original post by the bear)
I am sorry to hear about your relative's poor health. It would be a slippery slope if euthanasia were allowed for dementia.... then cancer.... then learning difficulties... there would be no logical endpoint.
For someone in their late 80s, whom doctors have already said "it's just a matter of time (before they die)" and "there's no possibility of recovery" it seems a far fairer option to be able to alleviate suffering. There is zero quality of life.
And no, it needn't be a slippery slope if the regulations were drawn up properly.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by felamaslen)
What about cases involving sane people who want to end their own suffering, but are not able to without assistance?
I'm not convinced these people know what's good for them and I'm happy for the state to keep these people alive through force.

Its already legal to go abroad yourself to a state which allows this, that's as far as I think we should go. Perhaps I'd prefer those who go with them to be given a fine over prison.

Personally I'm not sure I can ever be convinced. I'm so against it right now that if the Tories did this tomorrow I may never vote for them again.

Allowing its citizens to end their lives is not the action of a moral state.
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the bear
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(Original post by felamaslen)
What about cases involving sane people who want to end their own suffering, but are not able to without assistance?
hard cases make bad law. again it is a slippery slope; once you open the floodgates it will soon become accepted that Granny should bite the bullet and do the decent thing.
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Everglow
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Its already legal to go abroad yourself to a state which allows this, that's as far as I think we should go. Perhaps I'd prefer those who go with them to be given a fine over prison.
Yes, but many people who want to go abroad to countries like Switzerland can't because they are unable by themselves don't want their loved ones to be prosecuted for 'assisting' them. At present you can be charged with manslaughter for assisted suicide abroad. Why do you think it's okay for them to go abroad and do it but not in our own country?

(Original post by the bear)
hard cases make bad law. again it is a slippery slope; once you open the floodgates it will soon become accepted that Granny should bite the bullet and do the decent thing.
Can you stop using the 'slippery slope' argument please. It's fallacious and fails as an argument.
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Drewski
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(Original post by the bear)
hard cases make bad law. again it is a slippery slope; once you open the floodgates it will soon become accepted that Granny should bite the bullet and do the decent thing.
Has it not occurred to you that people may well want to end their life when things get beyond their control? That they don't want to carry on merely existing rather than living?

I know my parents have both long said exactly that, that they don't want to get to the point where Alzheimer's or dementia robs them of everything that makes them them.

Why deny people who are perfectly sane and rational from making a choice about their own lives? Who are you to dictate to them what they should do?
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