Lois_77
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Would anybody be able to explain what teleological ethics is?
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Everglow
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(Original post by Lois_77)
Would anybody be able to explain what teleological ethics is?
Hi there.

'Telos' is actually Latin for 'end goal' or 'purpose'. So, it follows then that teleological ethics are ethics that judge rightness and wrongness on end goals or consequences rather than on the acts themselves. Deontological ethics on the other hand judge rightness and wrongness on the act itself.

For example, utilitarianism is an example of teleological ethics and Kantian ethics are an example of deontological ethics.

Imagine a scenario where you have to decide whether it would be right for you to kill one person in order to save five.
The utilitarian (the teleological thinker) would say that killing one to save five is morally right because of the outcome where five lives have been saved instead of just one. This ignores the fact that you've had to kill that one person in order to save those five. The act becomes irrelevant because of the outcome of that action.
The deontological thinker, on the other hand, condemns killing one to save five because the only way you can save those five people is by killing that one person. And the act of killing someone is intrinsically evil. The outcome of an action is irrelevant; it is the action itself that carries moral correctness.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions.
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Lois_77
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Thank you, i understand now!

Hi there.

'Telos' is actually Latin for 'end goal' or 'purpose'. So, it follows then that teleological ethics are ethics that judge rightness and wrongness on end goals or consequences rather than on the acts themselves. Deontological ethics on the other hand judge rightness and wrongness on the act itself.

For example, utilitarianism is an example of teleological ethics and Kantian ethics are an example of deontological ethics.

Imagine a scenario where you have to decide whether it would be right for you to kill one person in order to save five.
The utilitarian (the teleological thinker) would say that killing one to save five is morally right because of the outcome where five lives have been saved instead of just one. This ignores the fact that you've had to kill that one person in order to save those five. The act becomes irrelevant because of the outcome of that action.
The deontological thinker, on the other hand, condemns killing one to save five because the only way you can save those five people is by killing that one person. And the act of killing someone is intrinsically evil. The outcome of an action is irrelevant; it is the action itself that carries moral correctness.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions. [/QUOTE]
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Everglow
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(Original post by Lois_77)
Thank you, i understand now!
Fantastic. Let me know if you need any more help.
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