How soon can your GP refer you to a mental hospital? Watch

laeof
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Squaresquirrel)
I don't think McNuggetsAhoy is on high horse at all . . . He's just stated facts, obviously none of us know the OP personally but the fact he can even go on a computer and form cohesive arguments is rather telling that hospital admission won't help.
Thankyou for pointing that out; that I may have come across too strongly as that was not my intention.

I would rhetorical ask however, what facts? I see people being offended that their advice is being shot down, and fair enough I understand that because there are a lot of knowledgeable people here. But the point is to support, whether or not we agree with someone's mentality. Even if the OP is doing that, why does that matter to us? That mindset is one thing that is often needed to be changed before a person can get help, I see a lot of you know that and are trying to point it out. Being blunt and telling them what to do and attacking them doesn't help change a victim mindset. I could be wrong of course. Different strokes for different folks!

Hospital will not fix your problems.
Not a fact.

You need to work with your GP and mental health team to fix the issue in the community.
Also not a fact. It often depends on the location and if the support system is any good. WIth funding cuts these services seems to have taken a massive down term. If the systems were half decent we wouldn't have people constantly in and hour of hospital for years. However the good thing with hospital is that it inspires people to never go back!! LOL. The worst thing is it goes on your record.

So say goodbye to some future jobs.

obviously none of us know the OP personally but the fact he can even go on a computer and form cohesive arguments is rather telling that hospital admission won't help
With all due respect my mum can't read and write. Does that mean a hospital admission won't help her either? Bipolar, schizophrenia often come with difficulty in developing cohesive arguments, would hospitalisation not help them? How many people in hospital can seriously write a cohesive argument? ****, some can't even string a sentence together. With all due respect I don't understand your mindset there.

Please don't take this post as personally attacking you, i'm not trying too. I know you mean well . I'm just a little bit frustrated and have had a bad day and that will be showing in my post. So, any frustration is not aimed at you.
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SuperWolfPaws
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#82
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#82
(Original post by Anonymous)
She gets so many reports about me, maybe she just didnt see it. I will ask again if i can be referred somewhere privately.
I do sometimes worry that hell hit me, yes, especially when he gets histeric. If that happens again ill just have to call the police, i cant deal with that level of stress and i shouldn't have to. Hes very controlling and emotionally abusive.
The hospital visits started about two years ago, i dont know how or why.
yes, i think it is interesting to know that you did use to be well 2 years ago. So there was a time when going to A and E was never needed or thought about. Maybe you can get some comfort knowing that with the right treatment your condition will be reversed or at least managed to a level were you have more control in your life.

Maybe you feel you have no control of your thoughts and what happens to you. Perhaps seeing doctors to reinforce your wellness is like a comfort object to you. And your sub conscious has made an anxiety cycle, that appears to have reached a critical point.

Yes , from what i have experience there are poor GPs (ones that just save money and are quite conservative/dismissive) and there are better ones who spend more time and budget on mental health. They are all different.

Maybe you could mention that your dad is behaving aggressive and that your condition is at a point were you feel you can no longer take care of yourself- if that is how your feeling right now. Your GP would have to take a note of that. i m worried you say she is not really reading your notes. That sounds like dismissive behavior.

I would imagine they would phone for a psychiatrist, to get an urgent appointment on the same day or whenever possible. you could be assessed as low-high risk, from there i think the decision is made whether or not to go to in patient. But this system may work differently depending on where you live. Or if there is a suitable private place to go to the referral will be different all together. I m no expert i m just going on my experience. good luck tho
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Squaresquirrel
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#83
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#83
(Original post by laeof)
Thankyou for pointing that out; that I may have come across too strongly as that was not my intention.

I would rhetorical ask however, what facts? I see people being offended that their advice is being shot down, and fair enough I understand that because there are a lot of knowledgeable people here. But the point is to support, whether or not we agree with someone's mentality. Even if the OP is doing that, why does that matter to us? That mindset is one thing that is often needed to be changed before a person can get help, I see a lot of you know that and are trying to point it out. Being blunt and telling them what to do and attacking them doesn't help change a victim mindset. I could be wrong of course. Different strokes for different folks!

Not a fact.


Also not a fact. It often depends on the location and if the support system is any good. WIth funding cuts these services seems to have taken a massive down term. If the systems were half decent we wouldn't have people constantly in and hour of hospital for years. However the good thing with hospital is that it inspires people to never go back!! LOL. The worst thing is it goes on your record.

So say goodbye to some future jobs.


With all due respect my mum can't read and write. Does that mean a hospital admission won't help her either? Bipolar, schizophrenia often come with difficulty in developing cohesive arguments, would hospitalisation not help them? How many people in hospital can seriously write a cohesive argument? ****, some can't even string a sentence together. With all due respect I don't understand your mindset there.

Please don't take this post as personally attacking you, i'm not trying too. I know you mean well . I'm just a little bit frustrated and have had a bad day and that will be showing in my post. So, any frustration is not aimed at you.
Hiiii, I get your point about how different people change their mind set in different ways.

Also I think you mis understood my post (iroically probably my fault as I get thought disorder from time to time XD) but I mean if someone can read/write/communicate well they probably don't need to be admitted. It is the people who can't communicate well that would benefit most from hospital admission (along with other factors of course). It seems clear to me that the OP falls in the first camp.
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laeof
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#84
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#84
(Original post by McNuggetsAhoy)
My attack as you put it (which it wasn't) was intended to come across as tough love. You can't always pander to people. When I was most sick the most helpful things my family told me at the time hurt like hell. But they helped.

Perhaps I have a different attitude to some people here but I was actually trying to help. I may not be directly aware of the OP's problems but I have experienced issues myself and know what it feels like to be at rock bottom. I'm trying to give the same advice I was given when I was at that point.

Take your meds. Work with your mental health team and put in the effort yourself to work with counselling (such as CBT, Mindfullness etc). With that the OP is likely to improve. If they don't they won't. That's pretty much all there is to it. Recovery is hard work (trust me I've been there for years it is not easy at all). But the hard work pays off in the end.
Yes I understand and know you were intending the best.
And I agree with you, tough love does work at times.
But for some people it has the opposite effect, especially if someone has a victim mentality. For some people tough love inspires them, makes them see more power and control of their lives! For some others it has the opposite effect.

You have experience of hitting rock bottom and want to help, that's fantastic! But everyone's experiences of rock bottom is different. Mine is not the same of yours for example, mine is not the same as my mums who went through full blown psycosis, mine is not the same as Mr Joe on the street who's rock bottom meant he needed a few days off work to recover. We all have different rock bottoms =).

But yes I understand you were trying to help and sorry if my post came across in an offensive way. I wish you the best of luck and good health! Nameste!
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Anonymous #1
#85
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#85
(Original post by superwolf)
Having read your responses in this thread I can't say I care for you OP. However I genuinely came into this thread with an open mind, with a view to help. I think that is evident from my post that I quoted. If you fail to see that, and fail to appreciate that for myself and others recollecting such times is quite a painful experience, one that we choose to remember for the sake of helping others, then really I pity your lack of empathy.
You said you dont care for me which i knew from the start so i think youre the one lacking empathy.
Its ironic how in a forum which is designed to be supportive people can be so hostile.
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laeof
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#86
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#86
(Original post by Squaresquirrel)
Hiiii, I get your point about how different people change their mind set in different ways.

Also I think you mis understood my post (iroically probably my fault as I get thought disorder from time to time XD) but I mean if someone can read/write/communicate well they probably don't need to be admitted. It is the people who can't communicate well that would benefit most from hospital admission (along with other factors of course). It seems clear to me that the OP falls in the first camp.
Oh, my bad! =). Compeltely my fault and my mind running away from myself. Very sorry!

We don't often admit people on the basis of a communication test. Would be good if that was possible though!

Possibly you're right about the OP =). But who knows? Sometimes people go into hospital with severe severe depression. It seems to depend on beds available though, if the person has support or a family around them (if they don't, there's an increased likelihood they will be admitted). I believe for a proper admission there needs to be three parties to sign it off. Before then it's mostly A&E whilst there's an assessment but I could be wrong they change the damn process so often!

Anyway, time for me to remove myself from this topic!

Wish you all the best xxxxx
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McMurdo
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#87
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#87
(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm seeing my gp tomorrow and I want to ask if I can be admitted to a mental hospital, will this be done on the day or is there normally a long waiting list?
It depends on the circumstances. I was taken there straight from hospital after a series of events and a pretty sh***y past. I was discharged last Monday. I imagine it's pretty hard to admit yourself to one of these wards, as they're (in my experience) pretty small, yet require 24 hour staff for few patients, and are more costly to run than regular wards for regular patients. Usually, you're only referred to one of these places if you really, really need to be (and it's not something the patient usually asks for, but is told will happen to them). I have been to hospital roughly 15 times I. The last 2 months, and I can tell you that a 'mental hospital', as you so bluntly put it , is nothing like a regular hospital. Why do you even want to go? Some of the people at these places are rather unsavoury characters.
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laeof
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#88
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(Original post by McMurdo)
It depends on the circumstances. I was taken there straight from hospital after a series of events and a pretty sh***y past. I was discharged last Monday. I imagine it's pretty hard to admit yourself to one of these wards, as they're (in my experience) pretty small, yet require 24 hour staff for few patients, and are more costly to run than regular wards for regular patients. Usually, you're only referred to one of these places if you really, really need to be (and it's not something the patient usually asks for, but is told will happen to them). I have been to hospital roughly 15 times I. The last 2 months, and I can tell you that a 'mental hospital', as you so bluntly put it , is nothing like a regular hospital. Why do you even want to go? Some of the people at these places are rather unsavoury characters.
Aye I had my hair pulled once just by walking past someone! They wouldn't let go either haha. Don't know what they were doing but it wasn't their fault they really just wern't there!
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Anonymous #1
#89
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#89
(Original post by Squaresquirrel)
Hiiii, I get your point about how different people change their mind set in different ways.

Also I think you mis understood my post (iroically probably my fault as I get thought disorder from time to time XD) but I mean if someone can read/write/communicate well they probably don't need to be admitted. It is the people who can't communicate well that would benefit most from hospital admission (along with other factors of course). It seems clear to me that the OP falls in the first camp.
Im sorry but thats the most absurd thing ive heard in a while. Your ability to read and write isnt or shouldnt be a factor in deciding who needs to be admitted or who doesn't.
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Squaresquirrel
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#90
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Im sorry but thats the most absurd thing ive heard in a while. Your ability to read and write isnt or shouldnt be a factor in deciding who needs to be admitted or who doesn't.
It's about coherency. In times of crisis many patients experience difficulty in communicating for a number of reasons. Some become catatonic, some have thought disorder, psychosis can make people completely undecipherable.

Obviously it is not a huge deciding factor but it is a factor used for judging the severity of the current patients condition.
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McMurdo
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#91
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#91
(Original post by Squaresquirrel)
Hiiii, I get your point about how different people change their mind set in different ways.

Also I think you mis understood my post (iroically probably my fault as I get thought disorder from time to time XD) but I mean if someone can read/write/communicate well they probably don't need to be admitted. It is the people who can't communicate well that would benefit most from hospital admission (along with other factors of course). It seems clear to me that the OP falls in the first camp.
Not true at all. When I was admitted, I saw people who were intelligent and well-spoken; smartly dressed; and, on the surface, appeared normal... Then they'd divulge their problems to me which manifest in other ways. On the other hand, I also saw the typical looking 'nutters', too. One was a 65 year-old guy who, yes, couldn't communicate properly, his trousers were always falling down and he always wore a multicoloured Afro wig. Some were there for insane anger issues. Upon my arrival, one guy was screaming "**** off, ****** ****s!" And breaking windows. Point being: people are admitted for a variety of reasons, and some of those reasons are not immediately clear, as communication skills can often be on point.
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superwolf
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#92
(Original post by Anonymous)
You said you dont care for me which i knew from the start so i think youre the one lacking empathy.
Its ironic how in a forum which is designed to be supportive people can be so hostile.
Having read your responses I decided I didn't care for you. Your OP was pretty low on information, and you're posting anonymously, so it really wasn't until you started having a go at myself and other people who made the grave error of contradicting you that I formed my opinion.

And I 100% back up the other people who say that based on everything you've told us, a psychiatric ward environment would be worse than pointless for you. Psychiatric wards are deeply upsetting places to be. They are for when you've hit rock bottom and are desperately headbutting said rocky bottom in an attempt to end your pain and suffering. They are basically a holding cell while staff do what they can to keep you safe. This largely consists of giving you your medication and waking you up every 15 minutes when you're trying to sleep (if you're deemed to be safe enough to be left alone for a whole 15 minutes that is). They are not for keeping people out of A&E. If you really want that, hire a security guard or build a panic room safely ensconced in your own home.
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Squaresquirrel
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#93
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(Original post by McMurdo)
Not true at all. When I was admitted, I saw people who were intelligent and well-spoken; smartly dressed; and, on the surface, appeared normal... Then they'd divulge their problems to me which manifest in other ways. On the other hand, I also saw the typical looking 'nutters', too. One was a 65 year-old guy who, yes, couldn't communicate properly, his trousers were always falling down and he always wore a multicoloured Afro wig. Some were there for insane anger issues. Upon my arrival, one guy was screaming "**** off, ****** ****s!" And breaking windows. Point being: people are admitted for a variety of reasons, and some of those reasons are not immediately clear, as communication skills can often be on point.
I get your point, but of the number of wards I've been in basically everyone had communicaton problems, some which are very subtle and others less so. Maybe it's just my experience of psych wards
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sherlockfan
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#94
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(Original post by Squaresquirrel)
It's about coherency. In times of crisis many patients experience difficulty in communicating for a number of reasons. Some become catatonic, some have thought disorder, psychosis can make people completely undecipherable.

Obviously it is not a huge deciding factor but it is a factor used for judging the severity of the current patients condition.
A person who has been able to communicate well all their lives may suddenly fall severely ill with depression and become suicidal, yet still able to communicate. I dont think doctors will ever say to such a person, "youre coherent so you can go home"" no matter how ****ed up the system is.
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Squaresquirrel
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(Original post by sherlockfan)
A person who has been able to communicate well all their lives may suddenly fall severely ill with depression and become suicidal, yet still able to communicate. I dont think doctors will ever say to such a person, "youre coherent so you can go home"" no matter how ****ed up the system is.
I totally agree. I was just trying to show another angle to the OP. I'm not very good with words if I'm honest so I fear I am coming across differently to how it was meant
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by superwolf)
Having read your responses I decided I didn't care for you. Your OP was pretty low on information, and you're posting anonymously, so it really wasn't until you started having a go at myself and other people who made the grave error of contradicting you that I formed my opinion.

And I 100% back up the other people who say that based on everything you've told us, a psychiatric ward environment would be worse than pointless for you. Psychiatric wards are deeply upsetting places to be. They are for when you've hit rock bottom and are desperately headbutting said rocky bottom in an attempt to end your pain and suffering. They are basically a holding cell while staff do what they can to keep you safe. This largely consists of giving you your medication and waking you up every 15 minutes when you're trying to sleep (if you're deemed to be safe enough to be left alone for a whole 15 minutes that is). They are not for keeping people out of A&E. If you really want that, hire a security guard or build a panic room safely ensconced in your own home.
I have hit rock bottom, and far from helping youre only making it worse. Your tone in every post has been despicable and im not going to bother answering you anymore.
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superwolf
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(Original post by sherlockfan)
A person who has been able to communicate well all their lives may suddenly fall severely ill with depression and become suicidal, yet still able to communicate. I dont think doctors will ever say to such a person, "youre coherent so you can go home"" no matter how ****ed up the system is.
I think Squaresquirrel's point is that lack of or alteration of communication skills is a contributing factor in making a medical decision. There are many such factors, and doctors can and will judge your illness or lack thereof by looking at all kinds of things even as simple as what clothes you're wearing.
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Squaresquirrel
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#98
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(Original post by superwolf)
I think Squaresquirrel's point is that lack of or alteration of communication skills is a contributing factor in making a medical decision. There are many such factors, and doctors can and will judge your illness or lack thereof by looking at all kinds of things even as simple as what clothes you're wearing.
PRSOM

EDIT__ Strike that, Just managed to give rep XD lol
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Squaresquirrel)
I totally agree. I was just trying to show another angle to the OP. I'm not very good with words if I'm honest so I fear I am coming across differently to how it was meant
Im not trying to appear contradictory, i just wanted to point out that while people with severe psychosis are often incoherent, people with severe neurotic disorders like myself are often not, in fact many are prone to using overcomplicated vocabulary when the same point could have been made in fewer words.
After all, Van Gogh could communicate beautifully through painting, and yet no one would say he wasnt mad
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Squaresquirrel
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Im not trying to appear contradictory, i just wanted to point out that while people with severe psychosis are often incoherent, people with severe neurotic disorders like myself are often not, in fact many are prone to using overcomplicated vocabulary when the same point could have been made in fewer words.
After all, Van Gogh could communicate beautifully through painting, and yet no one would say he wasnt mad
True.
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