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    Hey guys, I've been struggling on how to revise/prepare for the exams for English Literature A Level. I'm currently studying The Great Gatsby, and I would highly appreciate it, if someone who has done AS, give me advice? anything particular, what examiners are looking for? how to answer questions .. pls?
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    (Original post by Itshafsaa)
    Hey guys, I've been struggling on how to revise/prepare for the exams for English Literature A Level. I'm currently studying The Great Gatsby, and I would highly appreciate it, if someone who has done AS, give me advice? anything particular, what examiners are looking for? how to answer questions .. pls?
    I am also doing AS' at the moment and I dropped Lit last month because I hated it. I didn't actually get around to reading the great gatsby but I was about to buy a 'revision guide' centered around TGG and it has useful things in such as how to do well in the exam. If you like, here it is:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/A-Level-Engl.../dp/1847626688
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    Im doing Jane Eyre, I think its better to actually read the book rather than use sites such as sparknotes for the overview
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    Hey guys, I'm studying AQA, The Great Gatsby for English Literature A level, and i was wondering if there was someone that got an A/B in literature, who would help me out. I've got a test next week, and my teacher is being useless, how would you set out: how does Fitzgerald tell the story in chapter 3?

    what aspects would you need ALWAYS asses to get the top marks, something about form, structure? like i said, my teacher is utterly useless.. I would be forever grateful if someone gave me advice!
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    (Original post by Uw0tm8_)
    Im doing Jane Eyre, I think its better to actually read the book rather than use sites such as sparknotes for the overview
    This is true! (I'm not sure if you were referencing my post?) But anyway just to point out, although the book I suggested does have an overview, you are expected to read the book first and then the book, if you like, is for 'guidance'.
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    Which exam board are you under for english lit? I did the AS last year under AQA and managed to pull off an A. My teacher was one of the examiners for the paper so my class was lucky enough to get some notes from an examiners' conference with examiner's tips.
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    (Original post by Itshafsaa)
    Hey guys, I've been struggling on how to revise/prepare for the exams for English Literature A Level. I'm currently studying The Great Gatsby, and I would highly appreciate it, if someone who has done AS, give me advice? anything particular, what examiners are looking for? how to answer questions .. pls?
    I completed my as in English lit a few months ago and also studies Gatsby. The best thing you can do is read, read and read the texts. There's nothing better than knowing them inside out- because when you get an exam question on it you immediately relate to examples that are useful. As a side note, having a good awareness of past exam questions is good, and getting practise on them. Hand your answers to your teacher too so you know what to do to improve.
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    (Original post by beyknowles)
    This is true! (I'm not sure if you were referencing my post?) But anyway just to point out, although the book I suggested does have an overview, you are expected to read the book first and then the book, if you like, is for 'guidance'.
    Lool yeah, I need to purchase a jane eyre revision guide for myself too D:

    Btw what did you change eng lit to?
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    (Original post by Lilyghz)
    Which exam board are you under for english lit? I did the AS last year under AQA and managed to pull off an A. My teacher was one of the examiners for the paper so my class was lucky enough to get some notes from an examiners' conference with examiner's tips.
    i'm doing the same, AQA. I think the problem is that my teacher is completely useless, we don't even know the basic aspects.
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    (Original post by Uw0tm8_)
    Lool yeah, I need to purchase a jane eyre revision guide for myself too D:

    Btw what did you change eng lit to?
    I dropped it :rolleyes:
    So now I do French, Human Biology and Psychology.

    I thought it was rare for an AS student to only do 3 subjects but it turns out 1 of my friends from high school dropped Law before even starting college and after I dropped Lit, another of my friends dropped Psychology because they didn't know you could until I did.

    So many people are unaware that you can drop a subject whenever you want (within reason) and have to put up with a subject which really stresses them out and it's unfortunate

    EDIT: speaking about number of AS levels.. starting next year A-Levels are completely changing and you will only be able to choose 3 (unless you are gifted and talented in which case you get the opportunity to do 4) as they are becoming a lot harder as whoever is in charge of education doesn't feel as though they are challenging enough !
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    (Original post by Itshafsaa)
    i'm doing the same, AQA. I think the problem is that my teacher is completely useless, we don't even know the basic aspects.

    Tell you what, I'll PM you the examiner's notes and then if you want we can discuss further about your texts I did Gatsby for section A, so I'll be able to help you with that at least
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    (Original post by Lilyghz)
    Tell you what, I'll PM you the examiner's notes and then if you want we can discuss further about your texts I did Gatsby for section A, so I'll be able to help you with that at least
    omg, thank you so much!!! this honestly means so much to me!!
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    Hi, I have recently started the AS course in Literature and will be doing The Great Gatsby soon. So far I have done The Road. For question 1a you need at least 5 narrative techniques, more will be good. Try to explore those techniques, for example with the narrative technique of darkness in The Road, you could say the extract begins and ends in with the colour reference showing loss of hope, so on and so forth. To gain the marks you need to evaluate the technique, make sure you study the markscheme and follow it.
    For question 1(b) assuming you are doing AQA AS Lit B, you have to have different interpretations. One structure I began using was the following and it has improved my writing:
    Intro (brief) stating the two views and the one I agree with.
    Par 1: My chosen view with support and explorationm
    Par 2: Counter argument
    Par 3: evaluation of counter argument (how the evidences override it)
    Conclusion

    This is one way you could do it but I am still learning too as I have started it 2 months ago.
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    (Original post by Lilyghz)
    Tell you what, I'll PM you the examiner's notes and then if you want we can discuss further about your texts I did Gatsby for section A, so I'll be able to help you with that at least
    Hey Lilyghz, can I have the notes too.
    Thank you
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    (Original post by beyknowles)
    I dropped it :rolleyes:
    So now I do French, Human Biology and Psychology.

    I thought it was rare for an AS student to only do 3 subjects but it turns out 1 of my friends from high school dropped Law before even starting college and after I dropped Lit, another of my friends dropped Psychology because they didn't know you could until I did.

    So many people are unaware that you can drop a subject whenever you want (within reason) and have to put up with a subject which really stresses them out and it's unfortunate

    EDIT: speaking about number of AS levels.. starting next year A-Levels are completely changing and you will only be able to choose 3 (unless you are gifted and talented in which case you get the opportunity to do 4) as they are becoming a lot harder as whoever is in charge of education doesn't feel as though they are challenging enough !

    Ooh you have such an interesting combination of subjects.
    Yeah a lot of people say all this bs like ''you wont get into uni with only 3 blah blah'' Unis dont care, as long as you get the grades.
    I do, english lit, history, psychology, sociology and citizenship (compulsory)

    Woah, everything is changing in terms of A levels. Like next year there wont even be any AS exams, its all at the end of the 2years. its going to be so hard for them omds,
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    (Original post by Emily.97)
    I completed my as in English lit a few months ago and also studies Gatsby. The best thing you can do is read, read and read the texts. There's nothing better than knowing them inside out- because when you get an exam question on it you immediately relate to examples that are useful. As a side note, having a good awareness of past exam questions is good, and getting practise on them. Hand your answers to your teacher too so you know what to do to improve.
    Thank you! This was useful!!
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    (Original post by underestimate)
    Hi, I have recently started the AS course in Literature and will be doing The Great Gatsby soon. So far I have done The Road. For question 1a you need at least 5 narrative techniques, more will be good. Try to explore those techniques, for example with the narrative technique of darkness in The Road, you could say the extract begins and ends in with the colour reference showing loss of hope, so on and so forth. To gain the marks you need to evaluate the technique, make sure you study the markscheme and follow it.
    For question 1(b) assuming you are doing AQA AS Lit B, you have to have different interpretations. One structure I began using was the following and it has improved my writing:
    Intro (brief) stating the two views and the one I agree with.
    Par 1: My chosen view with support and explorationm
    Par 2: Counter argument
    Par 3: evaluation of counter argument (how the evidences override it)
    Conclusion

    This is one way you could do it but I am still learning too as I have started it 2 months ago.
    Thanks! Overall, i feel more confident now 😊
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    (Original post by Itshafsaa)
    Hey guys, I'm studying AQA, The Great Gatsby for English Literature A level, and i was wondering if there was someone that got an A/B in literature, who would help me out. I've got a test next week, and my teacher is being useless, how would you set out: how does Fitzgerald tell the story in chapter 3?

    what aspects would you need ALWAYS asses to get the top marks, something about form, structure? like i said, my teacher is utterly useless.. I would be forever grateful if someone gave me advice!
    Chapter three is written in 1st person narrative, meaning that you only get one viewpoint, the narrator; making is difficult to believe everything the narrator is telling you. Also, because it is written in a retrospective narrative, Nick could choose to give away or keep information for however long he wants, meaning he has full control over what information the reader gets. Just before the start of chapter 3, Nick has woken up after a very drunken night surrounded by people he doesn’t know, thus making the reader question his reliability, making reading the next chapter cautious because you don’t know whether to believe everything that Nick is telling you.
    Nick then prides himself as 'one of the only guests who was invited'- being invited Nick feels his is able to feel superior to the number of the guests who turn up 'in automobiles', however he is notably out of his depth as he feels 'ill at ease' when walking around the party. Nick has began to become immersed into the party lifestyle, yet he still does not fit in. He remarks on 'getting roaring drunk from sheer embarrassment' before attaching himself to Jordan, he needs some sense of familiarity. Fitzgerald then incorporates many voices to reflect on the busy nature of Gatsby's party, rumours begin to circle as the readers learn of his criminality 'i heard he killed a man' while others remark him as a 'war hero'. Nick only feels comfortable when devouring 'two finger bowls of champagne' to which the scene had become 'profound and elemental' - the fact that Nick only begins to absorb and feel comfortable with his surroundings after drinking shows a satirical view towards his surroundings, it seems he has to indulge in the drunken antics to feel involved, else he would be further marginalised.
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    (Original post by Farah_786)
    Chapter three is written in 1st person narrative, meaning that you only get one viewpoint, the narrator; making is difficult to believe everything the narrator is telling you. Also, because it is written in a retrospective narrative, Nick could choose to give away or keep information for however long he wants, meaning he has full control over what information the reader gets. Just before the start of chapter 3, Nick has woken up after a very drunken night surrounded by people he doesn’t know, thus making the reader question his reliability, making reading the next chapter cautious because you don’t know whether to believe everything that Nick is telling you.
    Nick then prides himself as 'one of the only guests who was invited'- being invited Nick feels his is able to feel superior to the number of the guests who turn up 'in automobiles', however he is notably out of his depth as he feels 'ill at ease' when walking around the party. Nick has began to become immersed into the party lifestyle, yet he still does not fit in. He remarks on 'getting roaring drunk from sheer embarrassment' before attaching himself to Jordan, he needs some sense of familiarity. Fitzgerald then incorporates many voices to reflect on the busy nature of Gatsby's party, rumours begin to circle as the readers learn of his criminality 'i heard he killed a man' while others remark him as a 'war hero'. Nick only feels comfortable when devouring 'two finger bowls of champagne' to which the scene had become 'profound and elemental' - the fact that Nick only begins to absorb and feel comfortable with his surroundings after drinking shows a satirical view towards his surroundings, it seems he has to indulge in the drunken antics to feel involved, else he would be further marginalised.
    Thank you! Seriously, you've helped me so much!! 😊😊
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    you welcome
 
 
 
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