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    Can anyone break down the modules for second year of medicine?
    I've been on individual university websites but they only give fancy module names and are just broad!
    I'm aware that universities vary but what do you generally get taught and how? (Please mention your uni also !)
    Thank you
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    (Original post by Mkhan86)
    Can anyone break down the modules for second year of medicine?
    I've been on individual university websites but they only give fancy module names and are just broad!
    I'm aware that universities vary but what do you generally get taught and how? (Please mention your uni also !)
    Thank you

    It will vary HUGELY at each university.

    At Southampton 1st and 2nd year are widely similar. You study systems so in first year you do nervous and locomotor, resp, cardio and renal. Then in year 2 you do more nervous and locomotor, more resp cardio renal, GI, endocrine and lifecycle bits.

    You cover anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology etc of each system.

    Alongside there is a more "humanities" module, and "Medicine in practice" which is clinical skills and patient interaction.

    There are essays too.

    Does that help at all?
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    Edinburgh

    Systems (relevant anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, biocehmistry etc):
    - Neurosciences
    - GI and Liver
    - Clinical Genetics
    - Renal and Urology
    - Endocrine
    - Virtual clinic (essentially a 'sum up' of all the preclinical systems teaching ie the above + Cardio, Resp, and Locomotor from year 1)

    Introduction to Clinical Practice (basic history taking and examination in GP)

    Epidemiology and Statistics

    Several clinical skills sessions throughout the year (venepuncture, nutritional assessment, urinalysis etc)
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    Because the curriculum arrangement is different at different schools they will all teach different things in 2nd year - although all the same basic topics will get covered across the whole of the degree.

    At St Andrews 2nd year covers:

    Systems based:
    Cardiovascular
    Respiratory
    Gastrointestinal
    Renal
    Reproductive
    - within each of these is the related anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, clinical skills (examinations, imaging, performing ECG etc.), which they put under Structure, Function or Treatment. There are different lectures for each of these aspects of each system, although there is overlap between them - which is nice because it ties everything together.

    Non-systems based (these run through every year, with different areas each year):
    Ethics - in 2nd year includes research ethics, medical errors, patient values & conscientious objection, end of life care (advance directives, euthanasia etc)
    Psychology - in 2nd year is more related to systems than in 1st year, e.g. the psychology of cardiac rehabilitation & cardiovascular health promotion; as well as quality of life & models of behaviour change; all years tend to refer back to 1st year health psych - psychological models of health and illness.
    Global health - this is public health, epidemiology, health statistics, evidence based medicine (studies etc.) etc, in 2nd year they relate it to the systems studied, e.g the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease.
    Clinical Skills and Clinical medicine - in 2nd year include cardiovascular exam and history taking, respiratory exam and history taking, venepuncture, urinalysis & others. These can involve interaction with real patients (both at the medical school and on placement every other week) or actors (simulated patients)

    All years include dissection sessions related to the anatomy being taught; clinical skills sessions related to the anatomy/physiology/pathology being taught; plus tutorials, workshops and labs related to the lectures given that week.

    The curriculum is spiral, so things taught in first year are brought up again and built on in 2nd year, and can also be examined again.
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    Looks like its actually pretty similar. Most schools are systems based so you'll do each system and cover the anatomy, physiology, pathology and pharmacology for each system. Most schools also have parallel strands where they will insert microbio, immunology, public health, ethics and psychology and patient belief lectures here and there.
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    It will vary HUGELY at each university.

    At Southampton 1st and 2nd year are widely similar. You study systems so in first year you do nervous and locomotor, resp, cardio and renal. Then in year 2 you do more nervous and locomotor, more resp cardio renal, GI, endocrine and lifecycle bits.

    You cover anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology etc of each system.

    Alongside there is a more "humanities" module, and "Medicine in practice" which is clinical skills and patient interaction.

    There are essays too.

    Does that help at all?
    Yes thank you!
    Do you get anatomy sessions at all?
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    (Original post by theresheglows)
    Because the curriculum arrangement is different at different schools they will all teach different things in 2nd year - although all the same basic topics will get covered across the whole of the degree.

    At St Andrews 2nd year covers:

    Systems based:
    Cardiovascular
    Respiratory
    Gastrointestinal
    Renal
    Reproductive
    - within each of these is the related anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, clinical skills (examinations, imaging, performing ECG etc.), which they put under Structure, Function or Treatment. There are different lectures for each of these aspects of each system, although there is overlap between them - which is nice because it ties everything together.

    Non-systems based (these run through every year, with different areas each year):
    Ethics - in 2nd year includes research ethics, medical errors, patient values & conscientious objection, end of life care (advance directives, euthanasia etc)
    Psychology - in 2nd year is more related to systems than in 1st year, e.g. the psychology of cardiac rehabilitation & cardiovascular health promotion; as well as quality of life & models of behaviour change; all years tend to refer back to 1st year health psych - psychological models of health and illness.
    Global health - this is public health, epidemiology, health statistics, evidence based medicine (studies etc.) etc, in 2nd year they relate it to the systems studied, e.g the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease.
    Clinical Skills and Clinical medicine - in 2nd year include cardiovascular exam and history taking, respiratory exam and history taking, venepuncture, urinalysis & others. These can involve interaction with real patients (both at the medical school and on placement every other week) or actors (simulated patients)

    All years include dissection sessions related to the anatomy being taught; clinical skills sessions related to the anatomy/physiology/pathology being taught; plus tutorials, workshops and labs related to the lectures given that week.

    The curriculum is spiral, so things taught in first year are brought up again and built on in 2nd year, and can also be examined again.
    Thank you!
    What kind of anatomy sessions do you do?
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    (Original post by Mkhan86)
    Yes thank you!
    Do you get anatomy sessions at all?

    Yep. Lectures and lab based. Lab at least once a week often more starting from year 1!
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    I'm at HYMS and we do the following blocks (all taught primarily by PBL supported by lectures):

    Disease processes - bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic infections, cancer, and a whole host of random diseases. Mainly pathology and microbiology. Clinical skills, biopracticals and placement.
    Renal and urology - intensive anatomy, physiology, pathology and social/psychological themes. Clinical skills, biopracticals and placement.
    Reproductive and child health - anatomy, physiology, pathology, epidemiology, sociology, clinical skills and placement.
    Musculoskeletal and nervous system - anatomy physiology, pathology etc. with skills and placement.
    Cardiovascular and respiratory medicine - mainly pathology I believe because all normal anatomy and physiology is taught in Year 1. Skills, biopracticals and placement.
    Gastrointestinal - like CV and R, mostly pathology. Skills biopracticals and placement.

    We then have a Scholarship and Special Interests Programme where we're attached to a research centre and have assessments once per term with them.
    Run through themes of ethics, public health, sociology, psychology etc.

    I think like a lot of 2nd year programmes, the main focus this year is the pathological side of things. You spend the first year learning about normal structure and function, and then in second year you learn how this can be disrupted.
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    Yep. Lectures and lab based. Lab at least once a week often more starting from year 1!
    What topics do you cover more in second year in anatomy sessions?
    Thank you again!
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    (Original post by Larry31)
    I'm at HYMS and we do the following blocks (all taught primarily by PBL supported by lectures):

    Disease processes - bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic infections, cancer, and a whole host of random diseases. Mainly pathology and microbiology. Clinical skills, biopracticals and placement.
    Renal and urology - intensive anatomy, physiology, pathology and social/psychological themes. Clinical skills, biopracticals and placement.
    Reproductive and child health - anatomy, physiology, pathology, epidemiology, sociology, clinical skills and placement.
    Musculoskeletal and nervous system - anatomy physiology, pathology etc. with skills and placement.
    Cardiovascular and respiratory medicine - mainly pathology I believe because all normal anatomy and physiology is taught in Year 1. Skills, biopracticals and placement.
    Gastrointestinal - like CV and R, mostly pathology. Skills biopracticals and placement.

    We then have a Scholarship and Special Interests Programme where we're attached to a research centre and have assessments once per term with them.
    Run through themes of ethics, public health, sociology, psychology etc.

    I think like a lot of 2nd year programmes, the main focus this year is the pathological side of things. You spend the first year learning about normal structure and function, and then in second year you learn how this can be disrupted.
    Thank you!
    What topics do you cover in anatomy sessions?
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    (Original post by Mkhan86)
    Thank you!
    What topics do you cover in anatomy sessions?
    I've only had one anatomy session so far this year. We use prosections to look at normal anatomy (so far this year, the only block we've done that's required anatomy teaching is the renal block so we were looking at kidneys). A lot of it is pretty self-directed i.e. Going into the anatomy museum with resource books and text books and working things out for yourself although there is a demonstrator on hand to ask questions.
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    (Original post by Mkhan86)
    What topics do you cover more in second year in anatomy sessions?
    Thank you again!

    Can I ask why second year and not first?


    It's the topics that we're covering in the rest of our classes.
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    (Original post by Mkhan86)
    Thank you!
    What kind of anatomy sessions do you do?
    2 main types:

    Traditional lectures - the slides are available online and they are also recorded and available through the university intranet if you need to watch them again. They are heavily based on Gray's Anatomy for Students, so this is an essential book to have.

    Dissection Room sessions - these can be either actually doing full body dissection or examining prosections, anatomical models and scans; in either type there are demonstrators who answer questions and help with dissection or with guiding us through interactive group tasks such as learning and drawing e.g. the coronary vessels and then teaching it to another group.

    We also have access to an online anatomy resource with tutorials, anatomy altases and videos.

    Also occasional surface anatomy sessions - these mostly involve drawing outlines of bones and organs on each other!
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    Can I ask why second year and not first?


    It's the topics that we're covering in the rest of our classes.
    In my personal statement I mentioned content in second year.
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    (Original post by theresheglows)
    2 main types:

    Traditional lectures - the slides are available online and they are also recorded and available through the university intranet if you need to watch them again. They are heavily based on Gray's Anatomy for Students, so this is an essential book to have.

    Dissection Room sessions - these can be either actually doing full body dissection or examining prosections, anatomical models and scans; in either type there are demonstrators who answer questions and help with dissection or with guiding us through interactive group tasks such as learning and drawing e.g. the coronary vessels and then teaching it to another group.

    We also have access to an online anatomy resource with tutorials, anatomy altases and videos.

    Also occasional surface anatomy sessions - these mostly involve drawing outlines of bones and organs on each other!
    Thanks! :-)
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    (Original post by Mkhan86)
    In my personal statement I mentioned content in second year.
    Why would you do that if you didn't know what the content in second year was?
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    Why would you do that if you didn't know what the content in second year was?
    I went with broad terms
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    (Original post by Mkhan86)
    I went with broad terms
    'Broad terms' eh... that's a new way of saying 'BS' to me. Why would you bother saying anything about content in second year if you didn't know what the content was in second year, to the point that you need to ask about it here?
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    For us:

    Anatomy(upper and lower limb, head and neck and abdomen)
    Physiology (abdominal, neuro-,
    Pharmacology (Pharmacokinetics, Diabetes, epilepsy, anticoagulants and antiplatelets)
    disease (microbiology, virology)
    Immunology (basics)
    Populations (Epidemiology)
    People's (social factors)
    Portfolio (NHS portfolio usage)
    Clinical skills (neural, abdominal, Oral, Diabetes)
 
 
 
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