Would you be more inclined to vote if we used a PR electoral system? Watch

Everglow
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#1
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I notice that a lot of the apathy towards modern day politics stems from the belief that our individual votes seem to count for very little, because in the end it will always be Labour or the Conservatives in power.

So, I ask whether or not you would be more persuaded to vote in next year's General Election if we converted from our First Past The Post electoral system to a Proportional Representation system whereby the proportion of votes to seats in the Commons is directly decided by the amount of votes a party receives. So if a party wins 35% of the votes nationwide, then approximately 35% of the seats in the Commons will be owned by that party. Smaller parties have a better chance of getting seats than they would under FPTP because they don't need to win over a whole constituency to get a seat.

Do you think things are balanced and strong at the moment, or would you be more inclined to vote if we switched to a system of PR like STV (Single Transferable Vote)?
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Crystalz
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No probably not in all honesty
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Imadinosaur2213
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Personally, I'd vote any time.however, it would depend on the person; PR systems can be really confusing (take the STV system; you get more than one vote.) This can cause inaccurate results. Also, I think I'd prefer for there to not be a coalition, which is was PR systems do; no party would have a majority and nothing would be done.
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RF_PineMarten
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I would. It would mean I could vote for any party that I wanted and my vote would actually count. No longer would "tactical voting" - voting for a party you hate to keep a different party you hate even more out because apparently that's a perfectly logical thing to do - be a problem. It would make protest voting a lot more viable, and isn't protesting kind of the whole point of voting?
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username1308327
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No.
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Alfissti
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Won't make any difference to me.

In reality no matter who is in government it is still usually the same **** with a different name and that includes any party that claims they are not the same. Why? In reality in order for a party to remain in power they will have to cater to the wants and needs of everyone and every business not just those that voted them in.
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n00
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Yes.
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gladders
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Turnout is appallingly know in every nation that has voluntary voting, whether they have our voting system or some form of PR. I doubt it would make any difference to anybody voting or not.
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Everglow
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(Original post by gladders)
Turnout is appallingly know in every nation that has voluntary voting, whether they have our voting system or some form of PR. I doubt it would make any difference to anybody voting or not.
I'm not so sure. UKIP supporters in particular have been unhappy that the level of support the party receives isn't reflected in the Commons. I think there might be an initial rise in turnout if we did move to PR, but naturally it would slump again as it came to be accepted as the norm. I think if more people understood what a PR system would mean for smaller parties like UKIP and the Greens, it might become quite a popular option as there is more value in the individual vote. Constituency strongholds would no longer exist for one thing.
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gladders
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(Original post by Reluire)
I'm not so sure. UKIP supporters in particular have been unhappy that the level of support the party receives isn't reflected in the Commons. I think there might be an initial rise in turnout if we did move to PR, but naturally it would slump again as it came to be accepted as the norm. I think if more people understood what a PR system would mean for smaller parties like UKIP and the Greens, it might become quite a popular option as there is more value in the individual vote. Constituency strongholds would no longer exist for one thing.
I'm not arguing that electoral reform would not be a good thing, but I suspect a lot of those who complain about the electoral system we currently have are complaining as people who already vote anyway. I doubt it will increase turnout much.
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Teaddict
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Without wanting to agree with Gladders on yet another thing, I think he is right. What we have witnessed over the last few decades is a general decline in voter turnout among the more consolidated democracies. This is backed up by numerous academic studies from a variety of countries. The institutional arrangement of the country doesn't seem to matter all that much. Whether less participation Britain or high participation Switzerland, voter turn out has continued to decline. Curiously, if I recall correctly, there was an article in an the Open Journal of Political Science that argued compulsory voting does not stem the tide of declining voter turn out either. I think we should just resign ourselves to the apparent fact that declining voter turnout in consolidated democracies is here to stay.
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gladders
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Teaddict, how DARE you agree with me! Get your own opinion!
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senz72
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I would probably vote. I live in a labour stronghold, so strong such that if Mr Blobby ran for MP, he'd still win by a huge margin. There's no point voting for any other party in my constituency. No other party even bothers pushing for votes in my town anymore.

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gladders
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(Original post by senz72)
I would probably vote. I live in a labour stronghold, so strong such that if Mr Blobby ran for MP, he'd still win by a huge margin. There's no point voting for any other party in my constituency. No other party even bothers pushing for votes in my town anymore.

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Same in my constituency - it's a rock solid Labour place. But I still fully intend to vote next year. I have no idea who for yet, but regardless whether they are a dead cert or a no-hoper, I will vote.
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Soontobesuper
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I'd vote regardless, but I'd like to think more people would turn out to vote if it wsa the case, but the lack of edu in some people makes me thinks maybe not
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senz72
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(Original post by gladders)
Same in my constituency - it's a rock solid Labour place. But I still fully intend to vote next year. I have no idea who for yet, but regardless whether they are a dead cert or a no-hoper, I will vote.
No point for me, can't even get a councillor to be anyone but Labour.

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Teaddict
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(Original post by gladders)
Teaddict, how DARE you agree with me! Get your own opinion!
Please rate some other members before rating this member again.
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Rakas21
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No, it would make little difference to the cause.

People wrongly assume that its down to the parties being the same on many issues but actually the last 200 years is full of periods where parties agreed with a particular consensus. This should not be a shock since only about 70% of those that vote are loyal and getting the other 30% takes place on a generational basis (your grand parents saw the high wage growth and secure public jobs as working for them post war, your parents saw private industry and high capital growth as working for them until about 2005).

The real problem since the financial crisis (low turnout in 01 and 05 was probably related to the fact people were happy and the Tories were weak) is that people no longer believe that the system is working for them and are blaming immigrants and big business.

Now clearly I believe a particular set of policies is the answer however as yet no party has come up with a policy platform to create a new consensus that parties will be forced to adopt to. Until that happens then PR or no PR, we won't be breaching 70% turnout and certainly not among the young.
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