Change.org - The World's Most Dangerous Website? Watch

pane123
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#1
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I hate Change.org. The idea is all well and good but it seems to have become a platform for censorship. Every day I receive emails because someone was offended by a joke someone made and wants them removed from the public eye.

The NHS rape poster debacle was a disgrace, too. I can understand why people might have been offended by the poster but what good is attacking the NHS going to do? The poster was intended to help, so why not guide the NHS on how it should have been worded, rather than accuse everyone involved of 'victim blaming'? Do these people really think the NHS's intention was to make rape victims feel terrible about themselves?

The other petitions I am asked to sign tend to involve a disabled child and a family wanting treatment closer to home. Again, the idea is nice, but is it practical?

I feel bad for anyone who cannot see their disabled child on a daily basis but expecting taxpayers to cough up millions just so one family can be happy is very, very selfish.

I am sure there are some noble causes on Change.org but there are far too many easily offended people using it as a platform to force others into their way of thinking.
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username1221160
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World's most dangerous website? You haven't explored the internet much.

I know Brits take pleasure in a good whine, but this really scrapes the barrel. You could just ignore the emails.
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BitWindy
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I wouldn't say it's dangerous, but it is replete with utter tosh.
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pane123
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(Original post by Quantex)
World's most dangerous website? You haven't explored the internet much.

I know Brits take pleasure in a good whine, but this really scrapes the barrel. You could just ignore the emails.
And ignore the fact that millions of people are trying to silence those who disagree with them? No thanks.
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username1221160
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(Original post by pane123)
And ignore the fact that millions of people are trying to silence those who disagree with them? No thanks.
If a person is silenced by someone saying they are easily offended then they really need to grow a spine and stop being so sensitive to other's disapproval.

And taking a quick glance at the website home page .... I see campaigns to stop someone being executed in Sudan and one for getting Nigerian girls into education. While I may question the effectiveness of such a website to obtain those changes, their hearts are in the right place.
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Octohedral
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I've just looked at the website for the first time, so someone may correct me. However, I've seen similar websites, and it's an interesting topic, so I wanted to post.

The idea of mass petitions is flawed anyway. I understand that it's necessary in a free society, for people to have some power to disagree with the establishment. However, the truth is that the vast majority of the population (including me) are severely lacking in either information or relevant education.

You could get nearly half of America to petition for creationism, but that wouldn't mean their opinions should be put on a level with scientists'. Similarly, the 4000 people who read a powerfully written, and probably genuinely very moving, story about a disabled child have no idea about the thousands of other disabled children, and the critically difficult decisions that have to be made by the mathematicians involved in the NHS budget.

Not everyone's opinions are equal. On the other hand, you have to allow people to have opinions, and I wouldn't want to live in a society where this website couldn't exist.

Dangerous? Perhaps. It's essentially a literate mob. However, I think that in practice the experts manage to live with petitions. Petitions essentially get an issue noticed - they don't force change. The mainstream media can be far more powerful in that respect, for good and bad (it definitely works both ways).
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pane123
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(Original post by Quantex)
And taking a quick glance at the website home page .... I see campaigns to stop someone being executed in Sudan and one for getting Nigerian girls into education. While I may question the effectiveness of such a website to obtain those changes, their hearts are in the right place.
I did acknowledge this in my post. Of course the idea is good but it is being abused.

I would question the effectiveness of a petition in getting Nigerian girls into education but it has been hugely successful in causing mass outrage over things like Dapper Laughs.
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username1221160
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(Original post by pane123)
I did acknowledge this in my post. Of course the idea is good but it is being abused.

I would question the effectiveness of a petition in getting Nigerian girls into education but it has been hugely successful in causing mass outrage over things like Dapper Laughs.
I've seen the impact of rape up close on far too many occasions. So Dapper Laughs demise is not something I'm going to cry over. I don't think that makes petitions dangerous.
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AdamCee
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(Original post by pane123)
I hate Change.org. The idea is all well and good but it seems to have become a platform for censorship. Every day I receive emails because someone was offended by a joke someone made and wants them removed from the public eye.

The NHS rape poster debacle was a disgrace, too. I can understand why people might have been offended by the poster but what good is attacking the NHS going to do? The poster was intended to help, so why not guide the NHS on how it should have been worded, rather than accuse everyone involved of 'victim blaming'? Do these people really think the NHS's intention was to make rape victims feel terrible about themselves?

The other petitions I am asked to sign tend to involve a disabled child and a family wanting treatment closer to home. Again, the idea is nice, but is it practical?

I feel bad for anyone who cannot see their disabled child on a daily basis but expecting taxpayers to cough up millions just so one family can be happy is very, very selfish.

I am sure there are some noble causes on Change.org but there are far too many easily offended people using it as a platform to force others into their way of thinking.
Couldn't agree more. Signed up to the site after seeing some useful petitions - nothing political (trying to get an artist to tour and ban Suarez). Got an email about the victim blaming thing and it p***** me off so much. Even more so the amount of supporters it got.
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Jammy Duel
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It's not dangerous, but there is so much crap on there. I think the best thing is that I signed one petition some time on there and now I get emails about all sorts, none of which are at all related to the petition I did sign. Too much of it is "boo hoo, something offended me" or "waaahhhh, something changed and I don't like it", but as said, it can't really be classed as "dangerous"
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