Chemistry revision!

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Kloekayne
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#1
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#1
Basically im new to this and my question is what is the best way to revise for chemistry? Im doing really bad and really need help with it!
What should i do?
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gamerteen14
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It all depends on how you work best, really. Most people split themselves into one of 3 groups:
Visual - L
earns best through seeing
Auditory - L
earns best through hearing
Kin
esthetic - Learns best through moving/being active/participating
You could take a test on the web to find this out, or you could go on what you already know about yourself and what methods you've used before that have worked for you. The next step is the actual revision part.

Visual l
earners are best to use lots of colours, make their work eye-catching, organise things according to where they are on a sheet of paper (e.g. info on hydrocarbons = Upper Left Hand Side, info on photosynthesis = Lower Left Hand Side) etc. Mind maps and spider diagrams are also an excellent way to revise (they really do work for me!).

Auditory learners can revise through listening to themselves or others, listening to clips and videos where they talk about the subject content (you memorize or summarize the information in your head and with a little bit of practice you should be able to recall it). Recording yourself reading through your notes in a good idea, and some others students in my class particularly like to make raps and songs containing key points

Kinesthetic learners can do a whole range of things to revise their knowledge - some simple things include walking around the room whilst reading or reciting your notes, taking part in a game designed to help you remember the content or assigning each key point a gesture/action which you can perform in the exam. Make sure you don't get too distracted with the active part though, you should be focusing on learning all that you can!

Of course you don't have to stick to one method - you can pick and choose if you feel like you're all three, but this should be a general guide for what methods could potentially work best for you. Hope this helps, good luck with your revision!

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[email protected]
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#3
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(Original post by Kloekayne)
Basically im new to this and my question is what is the best way to revise for chemistry? Im doing really bad and really need help with it!
What should i do?
Well, I don't know what level of Chemistry you're at, but I'm revising for GCSE mocks currently, and, although you may be way above me and this doesn't help at all, I'll tell you what helps me.
1. Past Papers. I can't stress enough how much the exam boards just recycle old questions (well reword them, anyway). If you've done all the past papers you can find (and marked them yourself) you'll find that your exam technique has improved drastically, and you'll - hopefully - ace your exams as you'll know the types of questions they use, and how to answer them to gain the marks.
2. Flash Cards. These are easy to make (you can probably find them online or something, or even buy them), and useful just to look at when you're walking from place to place just to give your memory a little boost.
3. Writing stuff down continuously. I find that this works better with languages, but it works just fine for chemistry as well. So if you find one of those annoying equations you need to remember, just write it down as many times as you need for it to stick.
4. Mind Maps. I'm working my way towards plastering my rooms with mind maps (and post-it notes, but that's point number 5). Just read a passage from the internet, or a text book/revision guide and then see how much of it you can remember by having a brain splurge onto that lovely sheet of paper. Then I tend to stick them on my wall, so I can lie in bed and think, huh, ethanoic acid= vinegar (well something slightly more scientific, but at the moment that's all I can come up with).
5. As mentioned above, plastering your living space with post-it notes. That way, every time you wake up you see something Chemistry, every time you make yourself a cuppa you see something Chemistry, even putting them on the bathroom mirror so that when you come to brush your teeth you see something Chemistry, and it gets hammered into your head.
Those are my main 5. I do use other methods (I even wrote a revision song for history..), so don't feel obliged to use these. I hope you do well with your Chemistry!
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Kloekayne
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#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by [email protected])
Well, I don't know what level of Chemistry you're at, but I'm revising for GCSE mocks currently, and, although you may be way above me and this doesn't help at all, I'll tell you what helps me.
1. Past Papers. I can't stress enough how much the exam boards just recycle old questions (well reword them, anyway). If you've done all the past papers you can find (and marked them yourself) you'll find that your exam technique has improved drastically, and you'll - hopefully - ace your exams as you'll know the types of questions they use, and how to answer them to gain the marks.
2. Flash Cards. These are easy to make (you can probably find them online or something, or even buy them), and useful just to look at when you're walking from place to place just to give your memory a little boost.
3. Writing stuff down continuously. I find that this works better with languages, but it works just fine for chemistry as well. So if you find one of those annoying equations you need to remember, just write it down as many times as you need for it to stick.
4. Mind Maps. I'm working my way towards plastering my rooms with mind maps (and post-it notes, but that's point number 5). Just read a passage from the internet, or a text book/revision guide and then see how much of it you can remember by having a brain splurge onto that lovely sheet of paper. Then I tend to stick them on my wall, so I can lie in bed and think, huh, ethanoic acid= vinegar (well something slightly more scientific, but at the moment that's all I can come up with).
5. As mentioned above, plastering your living space with post-it notes. That way, every time you wake up you see something Chemistry, every time you make yourself a cuppa you see something Chemistry, even putting them on the bathroom mirror so that when you come to brush your teeth you see something Chemistry, and it gets hammered into your head.
Those are my main 5. I do use other methods (I even wrote a revision song for history..), so don't feel obliged to use these. I hope you do well with your Chemistry!

Thanx I'm at AS level and yeah that helps thanx
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