BleiYoung
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Which one is harder: Dentistry or Medicine?
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username1197294
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Both are equally as difficult, hence they have extremely similar entry requirements in terms of grades, and take the same length of time to complete your undergraduate degree (5 years). Are you trying to decide which you would like to apply for?
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chickensthatfly
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well, medicine definitely open more doors in terms of fields of specialization compared to that of dentistry.
however at the end of the day, it all depends on your preference as well.

Medicine:
+ More earning potential in some specialties
+ Dealing with more than just the mouth
+ Greater responsibility in handling patients

Dentistry
+ Done in 4 years (no residency)

+ Average dentist makes more than most primary care docs
+ Better lifestyle (easier hours) and little call
+ Less litigation
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bertstare
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From what I generally hear, Dentistry is probably the tougher of the two at university (first two years are much more packed theory wise, a lot more responsibility when it comes to patients, etc), but Medicine is harder as a career
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BleiYoung
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(Original post by jesuis)
Both are equally as difficult, hence they have extremely similar entry requirements in terms of grades, and take the same length of time to complete your undergraduate degree (5 years). Are you trying to decide which you would like to apply for?
Yeah I don't know which one I should apply for. I was thinking that medicine would be more difficult because there are more areas of the body to cover
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BleiYoung
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(Original post by chickensthatfly)
well, medicine definitely open more doors in terms of fields of specialization compared to that of dentistry.
however at the end of the day, it all depends on your preference as well.

Medicine:
+ More earning potential in some specialties
+ Dealing with more than just the mouth
+ Greater responsibility in handling patients

Dentistry
+ Done in 4 years (no residency)

+ Average dentist makes more than most primary care docs
+ Better lifestyle (easier hours) and little call
+ Less litigation
I thought Dentistry was also 5 years?!
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BleiYoung
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(Original post by bertstare)
From what I generally hear, Dentistry is probably the tougher of the two at university (first two years are much more packed theory wise, a lot more responsibility when it comes to patients, etc), but Medicine is harder as a career
Oh I thought it would be the other way round tbh
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bertstare
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(Original post by BleiYoung)
I thought Dentistry was also 5 years?!
It is, he is probably from the US

(Original post by BleiYoung)
Oh I thought it would be the other way round tbh
By the end of second year, we arguably knew a lot more medicine than the medics. Because from third year our clinics become far more intense and we have to start focusing on the dentistry and the practical skills of it, so there was a crapload of theory rammed into the first couple years of the course. To be honest both courses are probably very similar in terms of difficulty, it certainly isn't worth choosing one over the other because of the course difficulty. Dentistry is, for the most part, a more flexible and relaxed job than Medicine, so if you want a less stressful career, it's certainly more up your alley
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BleiYoung
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(Original post by bertstare)
By the end of second year, we arguably knew a lot more medicine than the medics. Because from third year our clinics become far more intense and we have to start focusing on the dentistry and the practical skills of it, so there was a crapload of theory rammed into the first couple years of the course. To be honest both courses are probably very similar in terms of difficulty, it certainly isn't worth choosing one over the other because of the course difficulty. Dentistry is, for the most part, a more flexible and relaxed job than Medicine, so if you want a less stressful career, it's certainly more up your alley
Thanks for that. Yeah I'm trying to weigh out all the factors really
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AspiringMedic8
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(Original post by chickensthatfly)
well, medicine definitely open more doors in terms of fields of specialization compared to that of dentistry.
however at the end of the day, it all depends on your preference as well.

Medicine:
+ More earning potential in some specialties
+ Dealing with more than just the mouth
+ Greater responsibility in handling patients

Dentistry
+ Done in 4 years (no residency)

+ Average dentist makes more than most primary care docs
+ Better lifestyle (easier hours) and little call
+ Less litigation
You're wrong. It takes 5 years to become a dentist and then you have 1-2 years of vocational training. And dentists get sued far more in the UK than doctors.


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AspiringMedic8
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Damn, those Americans who think everything in the world operates as it does in the United States :rolleyes:


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AspiringMedic8
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(Original post by BleiYoung)
Which one is harder: Dentistry or Medicine?
Don't pick your career over which course might be easier/harder. Both courses are tough and if you can't get through one then you won't be able to get through the other.

Here are absolutely key factors which you should consider:

Dentistry is a hands on job. You could be the smartest person in the world, but if you cannot work well with your hands, with fine detail, which you'll need to have highly magnified to see clearly, then you'll be a terrible dentist. Likewise, if you have good manual dexterity then you'll be a great dentist.

As a dentist, you are mostly self employed. This means you get paid for each unit of dental activity you complete, rather than being paid a salary. This comes with added stress, because it means the faster you work, the more you'll earn, but this also comes with a trade-off in the quality of your work. You must also like the business aspect of the career. In the latter stages of your job as a dentist, you'll almost definitely be running your own practice. Would you like running a business? You would have greater autonomy than as an employee of the NHS, as you would be as a doctor, but added stress of being in charge of all your staff and of the practice finances.

As a dentist, you will be specialising in the mouth early on. Are you uncertain of which parts of the body interest you medically?

Another important factor is that whilst both careers necessitate great communication skills, in medicine a lot more of the answers will come from what people tell you than what you can physically see. Consider that medicine is a job which involves a lot more questioning of patients.

In short, if you do either because of the course length, pay or "easiness" of the degree then you'll be disappointed. Be a dentist if you: want to have autonomy over your practice, like working with your hands and like the prospect of running a business. Be a doctor if you'd prefer having more conversation with your patients, don't mind working for the NHS and like the variety that medicine will offer.

Good luck!


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chickensthatfly
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sorry bout that guys, yeah i was confused with the US system :/
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AspiringMedic8
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(Original post by chickensthatfly)
sorry bout that guys, yeah i was confused with the US system :/
I was only kidding, by the way. I never used to know anything about the US system and was quite ignorant
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SerLorasTyrell
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(Original post by jesuis)
Both are equally as difficult, hence they have extremely similar entry requirements in terms of grades, and take the same length of time to complete your undergraduate degree (5 years). Are you trying to decide which you would like to apply for?
Wrong, the high entry requirements are due to the volume of applications received.


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rm_27
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Quite random, but does anyone here know the amount of money Doctors earn in the US? As in a general practitioner! Also, this may sound very naive of me, but if the pay is so great in the US why don't many people from the UK move? I understand that people may not want to make such a big move as they have a family and are settled here. Also, are there loads of opportunities for British docs to go to America and work or does the US prefer their own? Basically, how hard is it to get a job there?
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AspiringMedic8
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(Original post by rm_27)
Quite random, but does anyone here know the amount of money Doctors earn in the US? As in a general practitioner! Also, this may sound very naive of me, but if the pay is so great in the US why don't many people from the UK move? I understand that people may not want to make such a big move as they have a family and are settled here. Also, are there loads of opportunities for British docs to go to America and work or does the US prefer their own? Basically, how hard is it to get a job there?
Moving from the UK to any country outside of the EU (and vice-versa) to practise medicine is a logistical nightmare. Many places want doctors to restart their residences, meaning if they hold a consultant position starting at Junior Doctor level again. And why would people move to the other side of the world for more money, leaving family and friendships behind? Life isn't just about money, especially when you'd be getting an extremely healthy wage in the UK anyway.


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Chicken Bacon
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(Original post by chickensthatfly)
well, medicine definitely open more doors in terms of fields of specialization compared to that of dentistry.
however at the end of the day, it all depends on your preference as well.

Medicine:
+ More earning potential in some specialties
+ Dealing with more than just the mouth
+ Greater responsibility in handling patients

Dentistry
+ Done in 4 years (no residency)

+ Average dentist makes more than most primary care docs
+ Better lifestyle (easier hours) and little call
+ Less litigation
Dentistry is about head and neck, not just mouth.
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username1197294
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(Original post by SerLorasTyrell)
Wrong, the high entry requirements are due to the volume of applications received.


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Where this is also true, the high entry requirements are also due to the fact that both are very challenging courses. Nursing is equally competitive yet only requires BBB, as there is less content required to be trained as a nurse. I doubt they'd set entry standards so high if the course wasn't as difficult as I know it is.
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username1197294
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(Original post by BleiYoung)
Yeah I don't know which one I should apply for. I was thinking that medicine would be more difficult because there are more areas of the body to cover
Where it's true you'll cover more areas of the body, they're still both as difficult. You not only cover the biological side, you also cover care and treatment, management and many other aspects to do with both dentistry and medicine. Medicine on the other hand will give you more opportunity to specialise so I would recommend this if you don't want to instantly narrow down your options to those provided by dentistry. Feel free to message me about this!
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