ZynFaze
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Applying stage already started pretty much.... No clue what I want to study, so I am thinking of going for a language that I have been thinking of learning and getting a degree in that.

In the end is that going to be totally useless?

When applying for jobs, the only higher achievement I would get is that I have achieved to get a degree.
Having a degree in "x" language etc... would be irrelevant though, right?
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VioletPhillippo
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Well having a degree in a language hasn't got the highest employability percentage yet if you have a language degree then you can go into a career related to languages so it isn't always useless. E.g. interpreting, teaching in UK or another country, translating, banking e.t.c.

What subjects have you done/are doing at a level?
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ZynFaze
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I did BTEC IT :/
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AdamCee
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(Original post by ZynFaze)
Applying stage already started pretty much.... No clue what I want to study, so I am thinking of going for a language that I have been thinking of learning and getting a degree in that.

In the end is that going to be totally useless?

When applying for jobs, the only higher achievement I would get is that I have achieved to get a degree.
Having a degree in "x" language etc... would be irrelevant though, right?
Of course it's not useless, given that a lot of employers look for graduates, they often don't look at the subject you've studied. As well as this you have a skill that could be used in almost any job, and opens you up to likes of translating etc.

Have you considered doing a degree with​ a language, though?
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Alludeen1
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It would only be of little use if you didn't end up becoming proficiently fluent in a second/third language by the end of it, since employers would rather have someone fluent rather than someone who knows their way around the language but doesn't have that level of authenticity. Even then, you have all the skills that a History/English graduate would have, although this obviously depends on the calibre of university you go to. If you become proficiently fluent in a second/third language, especially if they are 'unusual' languages (which are, unfortunately, generally the hardest to learn), and ally it with other skills (mathematical/scientific/economic) you would be very employable.
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ZynFaze
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Yeah, time is getting quite short now so I guess I'll go with a degree in Japanese or something similar as I really don't know what else I would have the interest in studying.

Better than wasting a year, may as well get a degree now :/
Just the problem I see is that you'd say "I have a degree in Japanese" which basically is saying you know a 2nd language (+ a degree level achievement), which is basically eh.

Anyone got any universities that provide Japanese?
I only got Sheffield and SOAS right now and obviously finding 5 will be optimal.
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CH Sheffield Uni
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Hi ZynFaze,

Our research found that 41% of businesses said that knowledge of a foreign language was beneficial so there is definite value in a language based degree. If you have any other questions please feel free to ask.
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xmarilynx
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(Original post by ZynFaze)
I did BTEC IT :/
IT and language skills are actually a pretty sweet combination. There are more jobs going in technical writing/translation than there are (suitable) candidates to fill them, as not many people can understand technical jargon in their own language, never mind others :p: Localization (translating software programs, writing user manuals etc) is fairly well paid too (30-40k starting salary).

Speaking from personal experience, I got job offers from Apple and Samsung and will be working as a translator for a financial software firm soon. Of course, there are plenty of other options with a languages degree - I just thought I'd mention localization given your background
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ZynFaze
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Yeah, kinda mixed views reading online and people saying it's not that useless and that it depends on what field you'll be working in etc...
Then people telling me what I would do if I were to have a degree in Chinese studies, having no knowledge in other specific fields except knowing another language, something which I could have learnt myself and should have studied something better at university which would help me find proper jobs so to say.

After a degree in a language, I'd pretty much be in the same spot as I would be now.
No experience / no knowledge in any specific field. Instead I'd have a bachelors degree and (theoretically) know a 2nd language. My choices are again, still in the air with no direction on what I should focus on as a career.

I don't know to be honest.. I feel like I'm going to regret it in the future.

I'm on the urge to just say screw it and start applying for Chinese studies etc... hmmmmm :confused::confused::confused::confused:
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Snufkin
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(Original post by xmarilynx)
IT and language skills are actually a pretty sweet combination. There are more jobs going in technical writing/translation than there are (suitable) candidates to fill them, as not many people can understand technical jargon in their own language, never mind others :p: Localization (translating software programs, writing user manuals etc) is fairly well paid too (30-40k starting salary).

Speaking from personal experience, I got job offers from Apple and Samsung and will be working as a translator for a financial software firm soon. Of course, there are plenty of other options with a languages degree - I just thought I'd mention localization given your background
I'm just being nosey, but are you staying in France, moving to Germany/Austria or returning to the UK? That job sounds great! How do you get specialised knowledge like that if you don't combine a language with another subject?
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yabbayabba
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(Original post by xmarilynx)
IT and language skills are actually a pretty sweet combination. There are more jobs going in technical writing/translation than there are (suitable) candidates to fill them, as not many people can understand technical jargon in their own language, never mind others :p: Localization (translating software programs, writing user manuals etc) is fairly well paid too (30-40k starting salary).

Speaking from personal experience, I got job offers from Apple and Samsung and will be working as a translator for a financial software firm soon. Of course, there are plenty of other options with a languages degree - I just thought I'd mention localization given your background
Did you do your whole degree in France?
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xmarilynx
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(Original post by Snufkin)
I'm just being nosey, but are you staying in France, moving to Germany/Austria or returning to the UK? That job sounds great! How do you get specialised knowledge like that if you don't combine a language with another subject?
I'm staying in Austria, although I did play with the idea of going back to England. I just love it here and the quality of life is fantastic

It depends what you want to do, but usually employers don't expect you to have specialised knowledge as they will train you - that's what grad schemes are for. What counts is your potential. For example, a friend of mine from school works for PWC even though his degree was in Geography, not Accounting or Business. But of course if you want to be a Dentist or an Engineer then it's less flexible.

That said, if I were to do my degree again I would combine languages with business or perhaps economics as, rightly or wrongly, languages are often seen as a super tasty side-dish rather than the main course.

(Original post by yabbayabba)
Did you do your whole degree in France?
I studied in France for the first two years then did a year abroad in Austria. So officially my degree is from a French uni.
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yabbayabba
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(Original post by xmarilynx)
I'm staying in Austria, although I did play with the idea of going back to England. I just love it here and the quality of life is fantastic

It depends what you want to do, but usually employers don't expect you to have specialised knowledge as they will train you - that's what grad schemes are for. What counts is your potential. For example, a friend of mine from school works for PWC even though his degree was in Geography, not Accounting or Business. But of course if you want to be a Dentist or an Engineer then it's less flexible.

That said, if I were to do my degree again I would combine languages with business or perhaps economics as, rightly or wrongly, languages are often seen as a super tasty side-dish rather than the main course.



I studied in France for the first two years then did a year abroad in Austria. So officially my degree is from a French uni.
Are you fluent in French then? What was it like studying in France as a full time student? Sounds like you definitely prefer Austria to France if you're living there. I did a year abroad in France. I'm toying with the idea of doing a masters in Paris as the fees are so low.
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xmarilynx
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(Original post by yabbayabba)
Are you fluent in French then? What was it like studying in France as a full time student? Sounds like you definitely prefer Austria to France if you're living there. I did a year abroad in France. I'm toying with the idea of doing a masters in Paris as the fees are so low.
It has its pros and cons. You get a lot of contact hours - around 30, even for an arts student. There was one day where I had classes from 9am til 9pm The facilities like libraries are good and my teachers were really friendly and went out of their way to help me. It's not as "studenty" as the UK unis with a campus, freshers events, student union etc but I guess as a master's student you wouldn't see much of that anyway.

Well in Vienna living costs are significantly lower and salaries are higher. Paris is beautiful and I didn't mind roughing it as a student, but I couldn't face living in an 8m² chambre de bonne forever!

I'd say go for it if you get the chance. You could perfect your French while getting a qualification which would make you more employable.
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yabbayabba
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(Original post by xmarilynx)
It has its pros and cons. You get a lot of contact hours - around 30, even for an arts student. There was one day where I had classes from 9am til 9pm The facilities like libraries are good and my teachers were really friendly and went out of their way to help me. It's not as "studenty" as the UK unis with a campus, freshers events, student union etc but I guess as a master's student you wouldn't see much of that anyway.

Well in Vienna living costs are significantly lower and salaries are higher. Paris is beautiful and I didn't mind roughing it as a student, but I couldn't face living in an 8m² chambre de bonne forever!

I'd say go for it if you get the chance. You could perfect your French while getting a qualification which would make you more employable.
Yeah that's what I saw when I went to a French uni. I spent the first part of my year studying for a semester at a uni then did an internship for the rest of the year abroad in Paris, I'm contemplate going back to Paris sometimes... I'm not bothered about student-y things like freshers, student unions etc. it's not a concern at postgraduate level even in the UK.

Ok, thanks for your insight! Much appreciated! Yeah, the financing my living costs would be the key concern I guess. And 8m2 - is that even legal? For the CAF they always stated you needed a room at least 9m2, as that's the legal minimum.
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