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What degree pays more; Petroleum Engineering or Computer Science

Thanks
Original post by Alchemise
Thanks


If you choose a degree based on the expected pay, you won't survive. Pick a subject you actually enjoy, something you'd enjoy spending four years of your life dedicated to and probably a whole lot more than that. You're not choosing between two nearly identical degrees, petroleum geoscience and computer science are totally different subjects with completely different career paths. I'm guessing you've done next to no research on either of these because there's no way you're passionate about both. You've probably just randomly selected two degrees that have a high average graduate pay that you can do with your A Level subjects.

To answer the question, both are highly paying. I'd imagine that the average computer science graduate would earn more but there's possibly more scope for very highly paid work in petroleum geoscience. But please, for heaven's sake, don't choose your degree for the pay. I can't think of a worse idea.
Reply 2
Original post by Chlorophile
If you choose a degree based on the expected pay, you won't survive. Pick a subject you actually enjoy, something you'd enjoy spending four years of your life dedicated to and probably a whole lot more than that. You're not choosing between two nearly identical degrees, petroleum geoscience and computer science are totally different subjects with completely different career paths. I'm guessing you've done next to no research on either of these because there's no way you're passionate about both. You've probably just randomly selected two degrees that have a high average graduate pay that you can do with your A Level subjects.

To answer the question, both are highly paying. I'd imagine that the average computer science graduate would earn more but there's possibly more scope for very highly paid work in petroleum geoscience. But please, for heaven's sake, don't choose your degree for the pay. I can't think of a worse idea.


I'm doing maths and science at ALevel and I'm looking into career paths. I've also taken computing and geology so I can go into either. Both of these suit me as I really enjoy maths. What would you advise?
Original post by Alchemise
I'm doing maths and science at ALevel and I'm looking into career paths. I've also taken computing and geology so I can go into either. Both of these suit me as I really enjoy maths. What would you advise?


I advise you to actually do some research. Look at university reading lists and read some books. Look at the actual modules in the courses. Think about what you'll be studying and what the careers are like and make your decision based on what you'd enjoy the most.
Reply 4
Original post by AlphaMolecule
JAIYEKO do you really still expect to get into petroleum engineering without chemistry, further maths and biology? :rolleyes: and compsci is nonsense

I'm not JAIYEKO
What makes you think it's nonsense?
You mean physics? Well Manchester which is probably the best for PetE only requires maths and science
Reply 5
Degrees do not have a salary.
Original post by josh_v
Degrees do not have a salary.

lol
Original post by Alchemise
I'm not JAIYEKO
What makes you think it's nonsense?
You mean physics? Well Manchester which is probably the best for PetE only requires maths and science


How do you know who JAIYEKO is?

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Reply 8
Original post by Edminzodo
How do you know who JAIYEKO is?

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I definitely isn't me so it must be someone else
It's like saying show that 1+1=2? Well it definitely isn't 3 or 1 so it must be 2
Original post by Alchemise
It definitely isn't me so it must be someone else
It's like saying show that 1+1=2? Well it definitely isn't 3 or 1 so it must be 2


Okay then. Sorry to bother you.

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Reply 10
Computer science is on average almost exactly average in terms of graduate salary. But at the top, it shoots up to probably the highest paid jobs, higher than medicine even. I'd imagine petro has a highish average salary but not massive difference between the average and top.
Reply 11
Original post by TVIO
Computer science is on average almost exactly average in terms of graduate salary. But at the top, it shoots up to probably the highest paid jobs, higher than medicine even. I'd imagine petro has a highish average salary but not massive difference between the average and top.

First actual response
Give me some figures? Pls
Reply 12
Original post by Alchemise
First actual response
Give me some figures? Pls


Average graduate starting salary just over £20k. Average compsci grad salary : £few hundred more.
Imperial/Cambridge compsci grad salary: £35k
I've applied for compsci btw, so not certain about petro never looked into it. But mech engg. certainly follows the trend I described.
Reply 13
Original post by Alchemise

Give me some figures? Pls


There are numerous websites where you can compare graduate and professional salaries.
You might find this research from the Sunday Times of interest. http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/uk_news/Education/article1467407.ece
Reply 15
Original post by Oxford Computer Science Dept
You might find this research from the Sunday Times of interest. http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/uk_news/Education/article1467407.ece

Nicely done :wink:
Original post by TVIO
Nicely done :wink:


:-) thanks. We were pleased!
Degrees don't pay, jobs do. Petroleum Engineers have access to high starting salary jobs, as for career progression I couldn't tell you.
Reply 18
Is it worth studyng Petroleum Engineering now given the current price of crude oil (50 $/barrel)? Especially, knowing that almost all oil companies are having huge losses and will cancel their projects I fear that this situation will translate in no employment opportunities for new petroleum engineering graduates or even worse dismissal of current employees.
Reply 19
Look at websites like Payscale and Glassdoor. They have specific salaries for companies. E.g. search Full stack developer at Microsoft. Also see the National Careers Service website- it has job profiles and some video case studies.
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/oil-and-gas-operations-manager


Remember the figures are only a guide. Think long term, not short term gratification. Building a career bears fruit after many years, if you stick to your field thst you enjoy and become an expert. With time, you could get 3x the amounts by moving abroad (e.g. an oil rich country... Or one thats trying to move towards IT digitisation). No names mentioned lol.

Many countores offer 'golden visas' for skilled professionals, so the world.is your oyster.

engineers often move to the middle least after working in UK for like 5-7 years, then get paid salaries of £100k+ essentially tax free.

So, as others have said, speak to comouter scoentists and engineerz, get work.expereince, do some questions from both courses and see which you like more and are capable at.
(edited 1 year ago)

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