JazzyT17
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Can someone tell me some good quotations for social mobility in The Great Gatsby. Please thanks
0
reply
TSR Learn Together
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Hi there,

While you're waiting for an answer, did you know we have 300,000 study resources that could answer your question in TSR's Learn together section?

We have everything from Teacher Marked Essays to Mindmaps and Quizzes to help you with your work. Take a look around.

If you're stuck on how to get started, try creating some resources. It's free to do and can help breakdown tough topics into manageable chunks. Get creating now.

Thanks!

Not sure what all of this is about? Head here to find out more.
0
reply
bradshawsl
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by JazzyT17)
Can someone tell me some good quotations for social mobility in The Great Gatsby. Please thanks
Hey,

Any reference to T.S Eliot's 'The Wasteland' generally - chapter 2 is a fantastic one for class mobility. I wrote an essay on narrative devices in chapter 2 as revision for my AS exam - I'll paste some of the relevant info in here;

The intertextual motifs, ’grotesque’ and ‘fantastic’ from T.S Eliot’s The Wasteland, are also employed as structural devices and repeated throughout the novel to imply the intrinsic link between Gatsby’s American Dream and the Valley of Ashes which ultimately, suggests its inevitable failure.

The failure of the American Dream is but one of the allusions to Marxism within the chapter; Myrtle is indirectly characterised by the ‘oversized’ furniture in her apartment in New York, which is located on the ‘top floor’ and symbolically denotes her aspiration to transcend her social status. The reader can feel contempt towards Myrtle due to her materialistic mindset, suggested by the her free-direct speech and the polysyndeton of her list of ‘all the things I’ve got to get’. Despite her ‘impressive hauteur’ following her ‘costume change’, Myrtle’s true residency in the Valley of Ashes with its ‘invisible track’, and ‘endless’ ‘spasms of bleak dust’ connotes the true inescapability of class, foreshadowing the future failure of her efforts towards class mobility (and more importantly, those of Gatsby), evoking some sympathy from the reader.

Hope this helps
0
reply
Smash Bandicoot
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
^^^what she said
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you feel the grades you will receive this year will be fair?

Yes I feel the grades I will receive will be fair (34)
21.94%
No, I don't feel the grades I will receive will be fair (75)
48.39%
I'm unsure (46)
29.68%

Watched Threads

View All