Biology - transport processes - help!

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em_97
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#1
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Could anyone help explain to me examples of proteins that do them for the below:

Facilitated diffusion
-Carrier proteins
-Channel proteins

Diffusion

Active transport
-Carrier proteins
-Endo/exocytosis

Would be greatly appreciated - Thanks!
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beyknowles
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Report 7 years ago
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(Original post by em_97)
Could anyone help explain to me examples of proteins that do them for the below:

Facilitated diffusion
-Carrier proteins
-Channel proteins

Diffusion

Active transport
-Carrier proteins
-Endo/exocytosis

Would be greatly appreciated - Thanks!
I'm not entirely sure what question you're asking
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em_97
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#3
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Just examples of substances that are transported by the above


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Another
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#4
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I'll do my best

(Original post by em_97)
Could anyone help explain to me examples of proteins that do them for the below:

Facilitated diffusion - If a molecule is not lipid soluble, it can't pass through the lipid bilayer of a cell membrane (or, the other lipid membranes of a cell's organelles). Therefore it needs facilitated diffusion, which is usually via a transmembrane protein with a hydrophillic core and a hydrophobic exterior

-Carrier proteins - A Carrier Protein is just one that helps non lipid soluble molecules move across membranes. The ones that work via facilitated diffusion, for example, would be any of the ion or ligand gated channels (e.g, neurotransmitters)

-Channel proteins - A type of carrier protein, that deals with passive diffusion of ions to stabalise an electrochemical gradient. E.G, voltage gated sodium channel.

Diffusion - If it's not facilitated diffusion, just plain ol' diffusion across a lipid membrane, you don't need a protein for this.

Active transport

-Carrier proteins - If it's using active transport, then it's pushing ions against it's concentration gradient. So sodium potassium pump, sodium-glucose co transporter. If it uses ATP, it's using active transport.

-Endo/exocytosis This is a bit of a weird one... care to expand why this has come under the list as well?
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em_97
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Thank you! That's really helpful - with regards to endo/exocytosis I was under the impression it was a form of active transport? I could be wrong though, I just thought it might be as they were on the same page in the text book. I understand it involves transport via vesicles? I was wondering what part of substances would use endo/exocytosis over the other name transport methods? Thanks for all the help!


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(Original post by em_97)
Thank you! That's really helpful - with regards to endo/exocytosis I was under the impression it was a form of active transport? I could be wrong though, I just thought it might be as they were on the same page in the text book. I understand it involves transport via vesicles? I was wondering what part of substances would use endo/exocytosis over the other name transport methods? Thanks for all the help!
I see! Well, it's a completely different process to the transport of small molecules via transmembrane proteins in the cell wall. I'm not sure how much detail you need to know about it, but I simply know it as when molecules are transported inside lipid membranes. In exocytosis, vesicles containing a molecule travels to the edges of the cell membrane to be released externally (Such as a neurotransmitter across a synaptic cleft).

In endocytosis, you can think of it like the reverse. A substance reaches the cell membrane and is engulfed by a small part of it. I know nothing of the details though, and the only example I can think of is phagocytosis :lol:

Wikipedia says that they are both energy using processes, but I think active transport might be a bit of a stretch. Who knows, someone here might correct me
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