How do you structure an English Literature AS essay. Watch

5secondsofwifi
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We have to write an essay on Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing' about how it can lacks seriousness. Can anyone help me to structure the essay?

Thanks!!
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Evening
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Any essay for AS level, or equivalents, needs to have a basic structure of:

-Introduction
-Brief Contextual History
-Analysis
-Comparison (If it is with other texts)
-Conclusion
-Bibliography/Works Cited

You won't be expected to include a bibliography under the time of an exam but you should include references throughout your essay and a bibliography for term essays.

Your introduction needs to be brief and to the point, stressing clarity and describing what you will do in your essay. Don't bother writing an extended introduction that takes up your word count - just have a brief little paragraph about what you will do, then offer a brief historical context afterwards.

Your analysis should follow the basic format of SQA - Statement, Quote, Analysis. Make a claim about observation, back it up with evidence like so:

"This is an example of a quote"

Then explain why the technique creates an effect, and how this relates to your given essay question.

You should always keep the essay question in mind for how many SQAs you do. In the conclusion you will round off your arguments by saying 'I have argued etc.'
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EloiseStar
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(Original post by 5secondsofwifi)
We have to write an essay on Shakespeare's 'Much Ado About Nothing' about how it can lacks seriousness. Can anyone help me to structure the essay?

Thanks!!
PEE!

Point Evidence Explain worked of me.

Make sure you set out your argument in the introduction and refer throughout.
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5secondsofwifi
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(Original post by EloiseStar)
PEE!

Point Evidence Explain worked of me.

Make sure you set out your argument in the introduction and refer throughout.
Thanks!!
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5secondsofwifi
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(Original post by Evening)
Any essay for AS level, or equivalents, needs to have a basic structure of:

-Introduction
-Brief Contextual History
-Analysis
-Comparison (If it is with other texts)
-Conclusion
-Bibliography/Works Cited

You won't be expected to include a bibliography under the time of an exam but you should include references throughout your essay and a bibliography for term essays.

Your introduction needs to be brief and to the point, stressing clarity and describing what you will do in your essay. Don't bother writing an extended introduction that takes up your word count - just have a brief little paragraph about what you will do, then offer a brief historical context afterwards.

Your analysis should follow the basic format of SQA - Statement, Quote, Analysis. Make a claim about observation, back it up with evidence like so:

"This is an example of a quote"

Then explain why the technique creates an effect, and how this relates to your given essay question.

You should always keep the essay question in mind for how many SQAs you do. In the conclusion you will round off your arguments by saying 'I have argued etc.'
Thank you!!
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emma-lauren
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The question and choice of texts are definitely important. The text you choose should be something you like, or at least find interesting enough to thoroughly analyse it.

Don't choose a really abstract question, just keep it simple as it will be easier to keep your essay focussed.

Be concise, if you can say the same thing in less words then do so. When editing be really aware of this.

Every point you make back it up, give evidence of your argument. You can use critics opinions to do this, quotes, etc.A. C. Bradley is good for Shakespeare, not sure if it's only for tragedies though.

In your introduction include your thesis statement and milestones which mark out what you will be discussing or arguing.

Conclusion; don't put any new information in this, simply summarise your points, reiterate your argument and don't use the generic "in conclusion" or similar phrases.

Plan thoroughly so you have a nice structure. Ending one paragraph with a point that can lead you onto the next text (which you'll discuss in the next paragraph) creates a nice flow.

Hope this helps and good luck!


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