kyraaalm
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I have always wanted to study Engineering at a top uni. I am currently an Arkwright Scholar and part of the engineering education scheme. I have all the right subjects and grades for physics and engineering.
Recently though, I am enjoying physics a lot and think I may want to go and study this instead.

I know that the job prospects for engineers are better, but is this still the case even at phd level physics?(cause I would be willing to do so)

Lastly, I would like a degree with quite a lot of maths in it, so I assume physics is the option for me?
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inachigeek21
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physics... Physics... PHYSICS OP!!!!
Physics is awesome imo!
But, of course, this is my decision.
Rightfully, the decision is up to you, as the life you create is constructed upon the life decisions you have taken.
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cadence
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So I applied to do engineering, changed to physics early on at uni, and then realised maybe two years later that I should probably have stuck with engineering. I now have a bachelor's degree in physics. I know where you're coming from. I'd say in some respects it depends how practical you want to be: physics degrees can end up being painfully theoretical - but very mathsy, so eh, swings and roundabouts? In terms of job prospects, I don't know the stats - it may well be that engineers do better, but I don't think physicists do so bad either, especially from good universities. Limited sample size, I know, but I've only got a bachelor's degree and I walked straight into my dream job, and of the people I know with bachelor's degrees, I think those that wanted to go into employment have done so. As for PhDs, I'd say take one thing at a time! If you want to go down the academic route with a PhD, then it's certainly very competitive, but PhDs in physics can also serve as a good springboard to go into industry - although I wonder if you might end up being "overqualified" if you decided to change direction completely after doing a PhD. Obviously also depends what the PhD is in - a PhD in particle theory is going to have limited applicability outside academic physics, whereas a PhD in condensed matter physics could be very useful in industry.
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Smack
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(Original post by kyraaalm)
I have always wanted to study Engineering at a top uni. I am currently an Arkwright Scholar and part of the engineering education scheme. I have all the right subjects and grades for physics and engineering.
Recently though, I am enjoying physics a lot and think I may want to go and study this instead.

I know that the job prospects for engineers are better, but is this still the case even at phd level physics?(cause I would be willing to do so)

Lastly, I would like a degree with quite a lot of maths in it, so I assume physics is the option for me?
Engineering only has better job prospects within engineering. Outside of engineering they're probably evenly matched.

Physics definitely has more maths in it.

A key factor is what you want to do for a career: if it's engineering, then stick with an engineering degree; otherwise, if you'd prefer to study physics, then go for it.
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kyraaalm
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(Original post by cadence)
So I applied to do engineering, changed to physics early on at uni, and then realised maybe two years later that I should probably have stuck with engineering. I now have a bachelor's degree in physics. I know where you're coming from. I'd say in some respects it depends how practical you want to be: physics degrees can end up being painfully theoretical - but very mathsy, so eh, swings and roundabouts? In terms of job prospects, I don't know the stats - it may well be that engineers do better, but I don't think physicists do so bad either, especially from good universities. Limited sample size, I know, but I've only got a bachelor's degree and I walked straight into my dream job, and of the people I know with bachelor's degrees, I think those that wanted to go into employment have done so. As for PhDs, I'd say take one thing at a time! If you want to go down the academic route with a PhD, then it's certainly very competitive, but PhDs in physics can also serve as a good springboard to go into industry - although I wonder if you might end up being "overqualified" if you decided to change direction completely after doing a PhD. Obviously also depends what the PhD is in - a PhD in particle theory is going to have limited applicability outside academic physics, whereas a PhD in condensed matter physics could be very useful in industry.
Thank you! I think i might enjoy physics more because I like the theoretical side and I guess engineering doesn't really have that!
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kyraaalm
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(Original post by Smack)
Engineering only has better job prospects within engineering. Outside of engineering they're probably evenly matched.

Physics definitely has more maths in it.

A key factor is what you want to do for a career: if it's engineering, then stick with an engineering degree; otherwise, if you'd prefer to study physics, then go for it.
Thanks! I think I'm gonna go with physics
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