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    What is the equation for the reaction between Ammonia, NH3 & Hydrochloric acid, HCl?
    I'm sure this is an easy ques, but can't get the answer!

    Thanx
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    (Original post by The Best)
    What is the equation for the reaction between Ammonia, NH3 & Hydrochloric acid, HCl?
    I'm sure this is an easy ques, but can't get the answer!

    Thanx
    NH3 + 3(HCl) = 3(H2) + NCl3 ??
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    Isnt it HCl + NH3 <==> NH4+ Cl-
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    Cobra's right.

    Remember that when you react the colourless gases of NH3 and HCl you get a white powder in the middle? That's NH4Cl I think, so Cobra's equation is correct.
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    (Original post by cobra01977)
    Isnt it HCl + NH3 <==> NH4+ Cl-
    THIS REACTION IS NOT EQUILIBRIUM.


    NH3(g) + HCl(g) --> NH4Cl

    Product is AMMONIUM CHLORIDE

    DENSE WHITE, FUMING GAS.
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    (Original post by vinny2256)
    THIS REACTION IS NOT EQUILIBRIUM.


    NH3(g) + HCl(g) --> NH4Cl

    Product is AMMONIUM CHLORIDE

    DENSE WHITE, FUMING GAS.
    It is an equilibrium reaction.
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    It's an acid - base style of reaction.

    Ben
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    (Original post by Ben.S.)
    It's an acid - base style of reaction.

    Ben
    Acid + Base --> Salt + Water.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    Acid + Base --> Salt + Water.
    Nope!

    Ben

    [Well, not always - in this reaction the base accepts a proton: basic substances don't have to have oxygen in them!]
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    (Original post by Ben.S.)
    Nope!

    Ben
    What?

    This isn't an acid-base reaction as you say. You would get water otherwise.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    Acid + Base --> Salt + Water.

    or just a salt, as in this case.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    What?

    This isn't an acid-base reaction as you say. You would get water otherwise.
    Read the additional bit above!

    Ben
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    (Original post by Ralfskini)
    or just a salt, as in this case.
    Yes I'm well aware of that.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    What?

    This isn't an acid-base reaction as you say. You would get water otherwise.
    Might I recommend extending your knowledge beyond GCSE. Ben is 100% correct. You can have an acid-base reaction that does not give water. What if you used a concentrated acid (not aqueous) and a concentrated base (again not aqueous)? This would be an acid-base reaction though there would be no way of producing water. It doesn't come out of thin air!
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    Yes I'm well aware of that.

    but you said it wasnt an acid/ base reaction when it clearly is!
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    (Original post by chrisbphd)
    Might I recommend extending your knowledge beyond GCSE. Ben is 100% correct.
    As I have just said, I'm aware of that now.

    We've drifted from my original point - this is an equilibrium reaction, as others have said.
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    (Original post by Ralfskini)
    but you said it wasnt an acid/ base reaction when it clearly is!
    I know. I'll say once again - I'm aware of that now.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    As I have just said, I'm aware of that now.

    We've drifted from my original point - this is an equilibrium reaction, as others have said.
    To be honest, all reactions (well - almost) are technically in equilibrium - just with some you can simplify as the equilibrium (under given conditions) is very far over to one side or the other.

    Ben
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    Thanx for ur help guys!

    (Original post by chrisbphd)
    Might I recommend extending your knowledge beyond GCSE. Ben is 100% correct. You can have an acid-base reaction that does not give water. What if you used a concentrated acid (not aqueous) and a concentrated base (again not aqueous)? This would be an acid-base reaction though there would be no way of producing water. It doesn't come out of thin air!
    Agree with you that you don't have to get water, but say you reacted HCl with NaOH in some kind of non-aqueous-but-polar solvent. Would water be produced when the H+ and OH- ions combine? I don't see how water being the solvent is relevant other than the acid/base won't ionise unless it's in water or a similar solvent........but then again i am rather crap at chemistry......so if you would explain it that would make me vrey happy

    rosie
 
 
 

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