Lambert87
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Hi all,

I start my last module with OU in Feb and its a sort of research (not my own research) and dissertation module... I am doing it on Stem Cells and was wondering if anyone had some good ideas?

Has to a subtopic within this topic "Discuss how stem cells give rise to different types of differentiated cell"

An Example is... "Stem cells in embryonic development: factors controlling their formation in position and time".

I am looking for a topic which a lot of research would have been done on it (as we don't conduct any of our own)

Any help is greatly appreciated
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polarina
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There is a huge amount of research out there into stem cells so it shouldnt be difficult to conduct a dissertation project on them. Stem cells are unspecialised cells which have the ability to endlessly cell regenerate. You can either have embryonic stem cells or adult stem cells- you can also get IPSC (induced pluripotent stem cells) which are adult stem cells "forced" to produce various transcription factors and genes so that their behavior and morphology changes to act more like embryonic stem cells.
Stem cells are characterised based on their potential to differentiate into various cell types -potency. Embryonic stem cells are termed pluripotent meaning they can differentiate into any cell type of the body. Totipotent are the most potent stem cells as they can differentiate into any cell type including placental cells and extraembryonic cells - however these are only present at the very early stage of development when the embryo is a 16 cell stage called the morula. Multipotent stem cells are present in the adult but have more restricted capabilities of differentiation - for example haematopoetic stem cells can only differentiate into cells of the blood like RBC's, platelets etc.
They have 2 forms of cell division - symmetric which produces two stem cells one mother and one daughter - asymmetric which one remains as a stem cell the other becomes a progenitor cell with limited cell division before terminally becoming a mature specialised cell.


This is the basics of stem cells - there are so many areas still under research - what triggers their differentiation? their role in cancer? and obviously there are the ethical issues involved to talk about. If you go ono web of science you will find some good research papers.
Just message me if you need anymore help
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Lambert87
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(Original post by polarina)
There is a huge amount of research out there into stem cells so it shouldnt be difficult to conduct a dissertation project on them. Stem cells are unspecialised cells which have the ability to endlessly cell regenerate. You can either have embryonic stem cells or adult stem cells- you can also get IPSC (induced pluripotent stem cells) which are adult stem cells "forced" to produce various transcription factors and genes so that their behavior and morphology changes to act more like embryonic stem cells.
Stem cells are characterised based on their potential to differentiate into various cell types -potency. Embryonic stem cells are termed pluripotent meaning they can differentiate into any cell type of the body. Totipotent are the most potent stem cells as they can differentiate into any cell type including placental cells and extraembryonic cells - however these are only present at the very early stage of development when the embryo is a 16 cell stage called the morula. Multipotent stem cells are present in the adult but have more restricted capabilities of differentiation - for example haematopoetic stem cells can only differentiate into cells of the blood like RBC's, platelets etc.
They have 2 forms of cell division - symmetric which produces two stem cells one mother and one daughter - asymmetric which one remains as a stem cell the other becomes a progenitor cell with limited cell division before terminally becoming a mature specialised cell.


This is the basics of stem cells - there are so many areas still under research - what triggers their differentiation? their role in cancer? and obviously there are the ethical issues involved to talk about. If you go ono web of science you will find some good research papers.
Just message me if you need anymore help
Wow!!! That was amazing!! Your idea of stem cells in cancer is very interesting!!! Thanks so so much :-)


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