SamuelKnowles
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I changed from psychology to English literature 9 weeks into my AS levels. I'm studying The Great Gatsby and Much Ado About Nothing. Can anyone offer any help into how to answer odd numbered questions? I.e. 'How does Fitzgerald tell the story in chapter 1?'

Thanks in advance.
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Paulska_
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(Original post by SamuelKnowles)
I changed from psychology to English literature 9 weeks into my AS levels. I'm studying The Great Gatsby and Much Ado About Nothing. Can anyone offer any help into how to answer odd numbered questions? I.e. 'How does Fitzgerald tell the story in chapter 1?'

Thanks in advance.
For this type of question you'll need to talk about how Fitzgerald creates atmosphere/tension in the chapter. Always bring in devices from language, structure and form.

Think about why he has chosen Nick Caraway as narrator of the story, what does his perspective have to offer the reader. How does Fitzgerald introduce the charter of Gatsby through Nick?

Think about what the overarching themes of the novel (class systems, treatment of women): the opening line of the novel; the reference to Midas (everything he touched turned to gold); the difference between West and East egg; Tom and Daisy Buchanan's lifestyle of travel and so on (quote: "they had spent a year in France for no particular reason, and then drifted here and there unrestfully wherever people played polo and were rich together.")

Also look at the characterisation of Daisy and Tom and the kind of people in society they represent: Tom is very racist and Daisy is very mocking of him in this chapter. What is Fitzgerald saying about wealthy people at the time?

It's important that Gatsby isn't mentioned in great detail -curious considering he IS the name of the novel, what feeling does this create for the reader?

Consider setting also, the wind filled room in the Buchanan's is beautifully described by Fitzgerald, what does the wind-buffeted nature of their home suggest about their relationship? Another HUGELY important section/setting is at the very end of the chapter: Gatsby on his lawn reaching out across the Sound. What does this gesture suggest? What might the green light be? Why does this happen at night? (The wind is important, imagery and pathetic fallacy are key in this novel).

I hope some of this got your mind ticking over, don't forget language/structure/form and if you want to make it special include some form of literary criticism (Marxist/feminist work well for chapter one)




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SamuelKnowles
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Thanks, this was really helpful!

(Original post by Paulska_)
For this type of question you'll need to talk about how Fitzgerald creates atmosphere/tension in the chapter. Always bring in devices from language, structure and form.

Think about why he has chosen Nick Caraway as narrator of the story, what does his perspective have to offer the reader. How does Fitzgerald introduce the charter of Gatsby through Nick?

Think about what the overarching themes of the novel (class systems, treatment of women): the opening line of the novel; the reference to Midas (everything he touched turned to gold); the difference between West and East egg; Tom and Daisy Buchanan's lifestyle of travel and so on (quote: "they had spent a year in France for no particular reason, and then drifted here and there unrestfully wherever people played polo and were rich together.")

Also look at the characterisation of Daisy and Tom and the kind of people in society they represent: Tom is very racist and Daisy is very mocking of him in this chapter. What is Fitzgerald saying about wealthy people at the time?

It's important that Gatsby isn't mentioned in great detail -curious considering he IS the name of the novel, what feeling does this create for the reader?

Consider setting also, the wind filled room in the Buchanan's is beautifully described by Fitzgerald, what does the wind-buffeted nature of their home suggest about their relationship? Another HUGELY important section/setting is at the very end of the chapter: Gatsby on his lawn reaching out across the Sound. What does this gesture suggest? What might the green light be? Why does this happen at night? (The wind is important, imagery and pathetic fallacy are key in this novel).

I hope some of this got your mind ticking over, don't forget language/structure/form and if you want to make it special include some form of literary criticism (Marxist/feminist work well for chapter one)




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Paulska_
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No problem


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