Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing this French project, and w've been asked to explain the tersm DOM and TOM. I know that they are abbreviations for Départements d'outre-mer and Territoires d'outre mer but i don't understand the difference :confused:

    Can anyone help?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    i still don't get it! :confused: what's the difference between departments overseas and territory's overseas:confused: and there's no way i could understand those HUUUGEEE blocks of french! :rolleyes:
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I think the difference is that the DOMs are places which actually belong to France (for example, Réunion Island) and are under French rule, whereas the TOMs are just places where French is spoken (like Canada).

    I think.. lol that's what it sounds like to me..
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    doms- are places that belong to france and have the same laws and legislations where as toms - are places where french is spoken and former french colonies i think as they use different currencies and dont follow french laws
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I think the difference is that the DOMs are places which actually belong to France (for example, Réunion Island) and are under French rule, whereas the TOMs are just places where French is spoken (like Canada).
    Nope. Wrong. Close though.

    The French terrritory and colonial system is quite complicated, and what I will explain is not in any way complete. Ther are also COMs (Collectivités d'outre-mer) and ROMs (Régions d'outre-mer) and many other confusing statuses that continually change. However, most French people call any colony a DOM-TOM and most don't know the difference.

    A DOM (Département d'Outre-Mer) is quite literally a part of France. They have exactly the same laws, the citizens are French nationals, they are part of the EU and use the Euro, and send representatives to the French parliament who can participate in exactly the same way our MPs can. It's like having an MP for the Falkland Islands in parliament. There is no legal difference, they just happen to be thousands of miles of ocean away:rolleyes:

    A TOM (Territoire d'Outre-Mer) is perhaps more akin to what we think of as a colony, although they are still very integrated into France. They may have different laws and customs, and enjoy much more autonomy of government. However, they still send representatives to French government and are still 'owned by France'

    The difference is mainly legal, and not that well-known even amongst French people.

    I think the difference is that the DOMs are places which actually belong to France (for example, Réunion Island) and are under French rule,
    Both DOMs and TOMs are considered to be French soil, to 'belong ot France' and under French rule.

    whereas the TOMs are just places where French is spoken (like Canada).
    Places like Quebec in Canada and other French-speaking countries are no more part of France than Australia or India are of Britain. They are completely seperate and countries in their own right.

    What you're thinking of is La Francophonie or more officially l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie. This is like the British Commonwealth, only for France i.e. a voluntary group of independant countries that have a previous history of being under French rule or having French influence.

    Incidentally, because Canada has a history of bothe French and British rule, it is a member of both the Commonwealth and the Francophonie
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Wow!^ Thanks for such a great thorough explanation.
    Je te remercie mille fois
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by a_man_1066)
    Nope. Wrong. Close though.

    The French terrritory and colonial system is quite complicated, and what I will explain is not in any way complete. Ther are also COMs (Collectivités d'outre-mer) and ROMs (Régions d'outre-mer) and many other confusing statuses that continually change. However, most French people call any colony a DOM-TOM and most don't know the difference.

    A DOM (Département d'Outre-Mer) is quite literally a part of France. They have exactly the same laws, the citizens are French nationals, they are part of the EU and use the Euro, and send representatives to the French parliament who can participate in exactly the same way our MPs can. It's like having an MP for the Falkland Islands in parliament. There is no legal difference, they just happen to be thousands of miles of ocean away:rolleyes:

    A TOM (Territoire d'Outre-Mer) is perhaps more akin to what we think of as a colony, although they are still very integrated into France. They may have different laws and customs, and enjoy much more autonomy of government. However, they still send representatives to French government and are still 'owned by France'

    The difference is mainly legal, and not that well-known even amongst French people.



    Both DOMs and TOMs are considered to be French soil, to 'belong ot France' and under French rule.



    Places like Quebec in Canada and other French-speaking countries are no more part of France than Australia or India are of Britain. They are completely seperate and countries in their own right.

    What you're thinking of is La Francophonie or more officially l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie. This is like the British Commonwealth, only for France i.e. a voluntary group of independant countries that have a previous history of being under French rule or having French influence.

    Incidentally, because Canada has a history of bothe French and British rule, it is a member of both the Commonwealth and the Francophonie

    I'm a FRENCH CITIZEN who was born in Martinique, which happens to be one of the 4 DOM (Départements d'Outre-Mer) .

    "A man 1066" has definitely got the right answer.

    Any question about this, just ask me.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: November 13, 2006

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.