Not really enjoying my first graduate job, should I stick with it? Watch

LMH89
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hello everyone,

The title says it all, I graduated last year and after constant rejections I managed to find a job in March, a role I was hesitant to accept after having interviews for other companies which I would have preferred, even though the job I have is better for my career in the long run.

Having spent nearly 3 months there I'm disappointed, firstly the training hasn't been great. During the first week my mentor wasn't there so I pretty much sat around doing nothing, I couldn't believe it when one guy told me to Google anything I didn't understand, then he would test me on the subjects?? :confused:

From here on the work picked up a little, as I have travelled around the country to gain a further understanding of the company and their systems. While interesting, I like the fact that I get out of the office which I really don't like.

Maybe I had the wrong idea, but everyone sits around in silence looking miserable, even when you walk in there is no hello, did you have a good weekend? At first I thought it was me, but no they all act like it, it doesn't help either that I am the youngest, there is no one my age and the rest are much older men. It didn't help when I visited another office that was completely different, everyone was doing their work but they were all laughing, joking and the whole office was personalised with experiences they had shared together.

Training is uneven, I hardly have any idea as to what I should be doing, I get bits of work here and there and I've only managed to speak to my manager twice as he's always in meetings.

All of this isn't helped by the fact that I go home alone every night and I'm just fed up, I hate to say this but I have a horrible feeling it is starting to lead to mild depression. I have no motivation to do anything and I am slowing giving up.

After reading this does anyone have any input on what I should do, how do your experiences compare? Should I give it some more time, if so how much more?

I apologise for the essay of a post!! I had to get this off my chest, my family are thinking that I should be looking for something else but I just wanted another opinion.

Thank you for your help.
2
reply
somethingbeautiful
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by LMH89)
Hello everyone,

The title says it all, I graduated last year and after constant rejections I managed to find a job in March, a role I was hesitant to accept after having interviews for other companies which I would have preferred, even though the job I have is better for my career in the long run.

Having spent nearly 3 months there I'm disappointed, firstly the training hasn't been great. During the first week my mentor wasn't there so I pretty much sat around doing nothing, I couldn't believe it when one guy told me to Google anything I didn't understand, then he would test me on the subjects?? :confused:

From here on the work picked up a little, as I have travelled around the country to gain a further understanding of the company and their systems. While interesting, I like the fact that I get out of the office which I really don't like.

Maybe I had the wrong idea, but everyone sits around in silence looking miserable, even when you walk in there is no hello, did you have a good weekend? At first I thought it was me, but no they all act like it, it doesn't help either that I am the youngest, there is no one my age and the rest are much older men. It didn't help when I visited another office that was completely different, everyone was doing their work but they were all laughing, joking and the whole office was personalised with experiences they had shared together.

Training is uneven, I hardly have any idea as to what I should be doing, I get bits of work here and there and I've only managed to speak to my manager twice as he's always in meetings.

All of this isn't helped by the fact that I go home alone every night and I'm just fed up, I hate to say this but I have a horrible feeling it is starting to lead to mild depression. I have no motivation to do anything and I am slowing giving up.

After reading this does anyone have any input on what I should do, how do your experiences compare? Should I give it some more time, if so how much more?

I apologise for the essay of a post!! I had to get this off my chest, my family are thinking that I should be looking for something else but I just wanted another opinion.

Thank you for your help.
As a graduate who has had a fair few jobs I will say this to you: just because a job title is prefixed by the word 'Graduate' or 'Graduate Scheme' does not mean that a) It will necessarily by what you hoped and dreamed of and make you happy. b) Be a good job with a company that appreciates you.

If I were you I'd get out ASAP. No job is worth risking your mental health for. The 'training' sounds dire to be quite honest - I've experienced similar in non-grad roles but you would expect more for a grad job.

Even if you have to take a step 'down' the ladder it's fine so long as it makes your day to day life more bearable. I think the bigger issue is what you genuinely want to do on a daily basis and what type of company/people you want to work with. It might feel like going back to square one but you need to think about what makes you happy and pursue a role that best fits the bill.

Don't waste you time with a company that can't be bothered to even train you properly or enthuse it's own staff - I tried to stick it out in a similar (office based) role in a very similar situation to you and it proved fruitless. Companies get set in their ways and hanging around to see if they change is not really going to benefit you at all.
0
reply
LMH89
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
Thanks somethingbeautiful, I definitely agree with you in terms of the 'Graduate' aspect. I never really expected it to be the dream job I've always wanted, I suppose like many people in my position I wanted a role that could give solid training which would prepare me for the next few years as I progress.

I initially thought I would stick around for a couple of years and then try something new, but now that might change

I suppose in terms of training that was the worst case I've have had, since then I've been shadowing one of the more senior team members. However it still feels forced, I just follow him around asking questions trying to take in as much as I can.

In the office it is a similar situation, except when I am having to ask 'Is there anything I can do?' I feel like I'm not the one who is the wrong. At the moment I am supposed to be in this position for 6 months or so, then I will move onto someone else for a month I think.

From here I think my training will focus on the role that I actually applied for, how this training will go I have no idea, although I dread to think.

In terms of taking a step back, this does not bother me at all as long as I land a role that I am happy with.

If you don't mind me asking, what sort of training have you received throughout the jobs you have had? I mean, is my experience normal and I just had high expectations?

The only worry I have now is if I apply for another job is it going to look bad to potential employers that I have only been in the role for 3 months and I'm already looking to move on? Or do I just explain my disappointment in the training and hope for the best?
0
reply
MrMango
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
What's the job? you're missing out basic information like what you graduated in etc.. only then will you get sound advice.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
LMH89
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
Apologies, if I'm honest I wanted to keep it as simple as possible as it is not the field of work that I have a problem with, it is more to do with the people, the office environment and the training.

It is a computer networking based role where I will eventually end up designing, configuring and installing the equipment that is used. Ultimately I did want this type of role, although my training in this particular field will not start for a while until I get a further understanding of the physical set up. I also graduated in computer forensics, a completely different field I know but many of the modules I did allowed me to change the direction I was taking.

I think the fact that I am the first graduate they have taken on clearly shows, obviously they have taken on people before but they are far more experienced. I have walked in and I get the impression they don't know what to do with me. On a day to day basis there is no real task for me to complete, especially if my mentor is away for the day, it is a case of asking for work or I am pretty much teaching myself. For example I have a list of technologies that I am supposed to understand by January, and yet I am teaching myself from articles online and any books I can get hold of. Now please correct me if I am wrong, but surely this is a University exercise, not something I would expect in a full time job?!!
1
reply
MrMango
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by LMH89)
Apologies, if I'm honest I wanted to keep it as simple as possible as it is not the field of work that I have a problem with, it is more to do with the people, the office environment and the training.

It is a computer networking based role where I will eventually end up designing, configuring and installing the equipment that is used. Ultimately I did want this type of role, although my training in this particular field will not start for a while until I get a further understanding of the physical set up. I also graduated in computer forensics, a completely different field I know but many of the modules I did allowed me to change the direction I was taking.

I think the fact that I am the first graduate they have taken on clearly shows, obviously they have taken on people before but they are far more experienced. I have walked in and I get the impression they don't know what to do with me. On a day to day basis there is no real task for me to complete, especially if my mentor is away for the day, it is a case of asking for work or I am pretty much teaching myself. For example I have a list of technologies that I am supposed to understand by January, and yet I am teaching myself from articles online and any books I can get hold of. Now please correct me if I am wrong, but surely this is a University exercise, not something I would expect in a full time job?!!
Tbh you didn't need a degree to do that job.. you could probs do better.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
LMH89
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
Having thought about it the past couple of days I am still pretty unsure about what I'll do, I've mentioned my problems to the people who actually run the graduate scheme to see if they can do anything.

I've also been looking at other jobs just to keep my options open, I'll apply and see what happens, even if reject me as I've only just started this role then at least I'm still earning during the mean time.

MrMango, if you were me then what sort of role would you be aiming for? I'm not sure how much you know about the area but the next step for me is to get my CCNA certification and then hopefully onto CCNP. My manager has set me the goal of getting my CCNA but I don't have to get it for 18 months.

Then again, for a networking role you would have thought they would need it sooner :confused:
0
reply
deviant182
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
Th it sounds like you're more in a placement role than a working role and they're struggling to know what to do with you.
The only way you're going to combat this is by talking to management. As in my opinion they're finding it just as difficult as you are.
Make yourself known. Bring some new ideas to the forefront and try to make some relationships with people in the office. It's not all their faults and people may just be feeling as awkward and disillusioned as you are.
It can only help your career if you're doing something.
If you look for a new job be honest and say it wasn't challenging you enough etc. Employers appreciate the honesty and want employees to push themselves, be happy and earn that company as much money as possible in the process!

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
tinkerbell_xxx
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by LMH89)
Having thought about it the past couple of days I am still pretty unsure about what I'll do, I've mentioned my problems to the people who actually run the graduate scheme to see if they can do anything.

I've also been looking at other jobs just to keep my options open, I'll apply and see what happens, even if reject me as I've only just started this role then at least I'm still earning during the mean time.

MrMango, if you were me then what sort of role would you be aiming for? I'm not sure how much you know about the area but the next step for me is to get my CCNA certification and then hopefully onto CCNP. My manager has set me the goal of getting my CCNA but I don't have to get it for 18 months.

Then again, for a networking role you would have thought they would need it sooner :confused:
Where about is the company?
I'm on a computer networking degree course and I'm looking for placements for next year
0
reply
Guybrush Sheepgood
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
Depends on the job and the prospects, however, I will tell you that I've had 3 jobs since leaving uni - the first I quit after 2 months, the second after 3, and now I'm in a significantly better job where people actually care about you and everyone has fun. I've also turned down several offers because I knew they would be crap.

If it's destroying you, and it has no prospects e.g. you don't like the industry, you should leave as long as you have a plan of what you want to do. If the job is good experience despite being miserable, it might be good to stick at it for another 6 months since you've already been there 3 months. Then you can start looking for another job.
1
reply
bijesh12
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
I quit my first graduate job aswell, thinking I wanted to go Into finance and when I did I found it boring. My goal was always to find a place where I can kind use my degree using a hands on approach, and a finance analyst didn't do that. I'm still searching for this job, and I've faced rejections again. But honestly follow what you want to do, rather than for the sake of just doing a job.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
MrMango
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by LMH89)
Having thought about it the past couple of days I am still pretty unsure about what I'll do, I've mentioned my problems to the people who actually run the graduate scheme to see if they can do anything.

I've also been looking at other jobs just to keep my options open, I'll apply and see what happens, even if reject me as I've only just started this role then at least I'm still earning during the mean time.

MrMango, if you were me then what sort of role would you be aiming for? I'm not sure how much you know about the area but the next step for me is to get my CCNA certification and then hopefully onto CCNP. My manager has set me the goal of getting my CCNA but I don't have to get it for 18 months.

Then again, for a networking role you would have thought they would need it sooner :confused:
Again these vendor qualifications could easily be achieved without a degree alot of people self-study them. Thing is you could do better but with the economy in the shape it is you're probs better of sticking it out as you're getting experience regardless.. stick with it get your experience n leave.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
LMH89
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#13
Hey guys,

Thank you for the comments,I aired my thoughts to the other graduates/managers and I get the impression that they think "what is your problem?" but it still worries me when everyone else is saying they have involvement with meetings, multiple projects on the go etc. And there's me in the office reading books to fill the time if I'm not doing a spreadsheet of some sort.

My mentor has said that for the first few months I won't really be doing anything either way. I am there to try and absorb as much as I can. To a degree I understand but in comparison to the others it seems to be significantly different.

I agree in that they don't seem to know what to do with me, the planning is lacking and the staff don't want to know. It feels pretty hurtful when my mentor said I could do a task for someone, leading to the response of "Him? Nah I'll leave it thanks". Thanks very much.

The fact that some of you have changed jobs relatively quickly feels reassuring, as my work involves visiting other offices I was fortunate enough to visit the Channel 4 offices. OMG it was like another world! Everyone was relaxed, chatty, a whole age range of people which was great, for me this was definitely the sort of place I want!

While I have managed to make some progress with the youngest guys in the office, I am still attempting to break the ice, I guess it just needs time.

MrMango, I am curious as to how you would go about this? I agree they can be easily self taught, although you do need practical experience! I'm assuming you have knowledge of this area, if you were me would you change field? Is there something else I should be doing? From the places I have visited I have taken an interest in the administration side of things such as server config. How I can get into this I am not sure, but what would you expect to see to make sure that I am getting the most out of my degree? Maybe I am just trying to do too much at once

Again, thank you everyone, I think I've waffled on enough!!
0
reply
EXSTUDENT12
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 years ago
#14
Hi LMH89, probably a little late but I hope things have improved for you.

Unfortunately I can vouch for the fact that a lot of jobs and companies do not understand training. At all. My own experience: I was taken on as a "graduate engineer" for a company. For 3 months I sat at a desk with no mentorship, no training, no instruction, no nothing. This was a new role and this company were new to graduates. In this time I met my manager, a Group director on a handful of occasions. And by the way, when I say "no training", I mean none. Zilch. I sat there thinking...what am I supposed to do? What are my daily responsibilities? In the end I realised I had to figure out the job myself, so I did. I am self-taught at everything I do and know and now I find, if I say so myself, I know it better than some who have been doing it a long time, guess that is the benefit from doing it this way. It is not easy I know. I am not going to lie, it has been a nightmare and at times I feel like I have been taken advantage of as I am the type to not say anything and just get on with it.

To hopefully offer some inspiration though, it worked for me, after 2.5 years I am now leaving for a new job with the promise of having my now job back should I ever wish. A nice comfort. I was promoted after 18 months and have used the experience to get a higher salary elsewhere at a more senior level. I began to like the job and company I loathed at the start and am now sad to be going! I am fairly sure that being chucked in at the deep end and learning as I have was of great benefit to me and ultimately impressed my new employer. Basically, see it as a learning curve. Whether you stay at this company for the long term or not, this experience WILL benefit you. Think of it that way. Best of luck.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have a role model?

Yes - I know them personally (299)
26.05%
Yes - they're famous (293)
25.52%
No I don't (556)
48.43%

Watched Threads

View All