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    By the way, there are numerous threads on this subject, largest being here.
    • PS Helper
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    PS Helper
    (Original post by Psyk)
    No it's not accurate, I just plucked it out of thin air:p: But you get my point. I agree with you that there are people that should be getting it but don't. It isn't a one way problem.
    I realised that, but I was trying to be polite (instead of saying it was bull!) :p:

    And exactly do you think this problem should be solved, huh?
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    (Original post by OnlyMe!)
    I realised that, but I was trying to be polite (instead of saying it was bull!) :p:

    And exactly do you think this problem should be solved, huh?
    I think individual cases should be looked at seperately. But I suppose there would be too many trying to claim it for that to be workable. I think it should take more into account than simply the amount of money the household gets. For one thing maintenance payments from split up parents should be taken into account and also the amount of people in the family should be considered.
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    The same scenario applies for univerisity.

    People from low income backgrounds, get the highest amount of busaries, and little loan

    People from high income background can afford it

    the people in the middle are left all at sea again, i will get the biggest loan...and smallest busary, in affect it means im paying back the most!
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    I had a friend from school who's mum was unable to work, and there was only her and her mum in the house. Is she not deserving?

    As it turned out for me, my parents are divorced so I got money from my dad in addition to EMA but my mum wouldn't have been able to give me anything, I never asked her for clothes etc. either so anything I bought was either from money my dad gave me or EMA. I'd not say i'm the most deserving like my friend was but if something's there I'm hardly going to say no.
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    (Original post by Bossworld)
    I had a friend from school who's mum was unable to work, and there was only her and her mum in the house. Is she not deserving?

    As it turned out for me, my parents are divorced so I got money from my dad in addition to EMA but my mum wouldn't have been able to give me anything, I never asked her for clothes etc. either so anything I bought was either from money my dad gave me or EMA. I'd not say i'm the most deserving like my friend was but if something's there I'm hardly going to say no.
    You've touched on the stupid bit of EMA for me actually.

    If your parents are divorced and you live with your mum who earns 12k per annum, you can get EMA irregardless of whether your Dad is Bill Gates or Richard Branson and gives you 40k a day.
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    it seems that many of the people shouting about EMA being bad are those who dont get it and are jealous.

    My taxes fund the EMA (iw work full time) and i have no problem with students getting it.
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    (Original post by Cadre_Of_Storms)
    it seems that many of the people shouting about EMA being bad are those who dont get it and are jealous.

    My taxes fund the EMA (iw work full time) and i have no problem with students getting it.
    Well I suppose that is partly true:p: I didn't get it, and I am jealous. But I'd like to think that I'd recognise that I shouldn't really be getting the money if I did. I probably wouldn't be so vocal about it's problems but I'd still disagree with the way it works.
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    I think they should encourage school leavers (especially working class kids) to go into an apprenticeship to be an electrician / plumber / mechanic etc instead of just encouraging people to waste another 2 years of their life at college when they're only going to go and work in Tescos anyway. Pay people to do meaningful things. Then the astronomical fees for plumbers / electricians and other skilled trades might get brought down.

    I'm sure I was destined to be president :rolleyes:
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    There is no way it can actually be spent on education without getting money from a part-time job, or from parents - or some other source. I get £10 a week, in an average week I spend about £2 on dinner money per day. That is £10. I need a Psychology book, £16. I went to sixth form, had I of went to college I'd have needed £10 a week bus fare.

    Also, not once has EMA or a teacher told me that the money is to be spent on education and education alone, if it was meant for that surely it would be in the form of a voucher which enables you just to buy books, or give to the school in exchange for dinner as opposed to £10, £20 or £30 just handed to you through your bank account.
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    (Original post by Noobish)
    No. Im going to progress to University!

    if you need to know, (rly dont have a clue why though?)

    GCSEs:

    A* - History
    A*A* - Dble Science
    A - Maths
    AB - English & Lit
    B -Geography
    C - ICT
    Hmm, your attitude towards the whole EMA thing led me to believe you were one of those students that simply went to college for the money. Obviously I was wrong. Good luck with it.
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    (Original post by 1805)
    I get £10 a week, in an average week I spend about £2 on dinner money per day. That is £10. I need a Psychology book, £16.
    Take a packed lunch and save your £10 a week for books then? :rolleyes:

    I have no objection to people who truly need it having it. I also don't think everyone should get it since clearly the rich don't need it.

    HOWEVER I think that for the most part the idea is absolutely abhorrent. Why the hell does the government think it's a good idea to bribe kids to stay in school? And why oh why is it given to the kids in cash, rather than in vouchers, or directly to the parents in household expenses?
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    (Original post by 1805)
    Hmm, your attitude towards the whole EMA thing led me to believe you were one of those students that simply went to college for the money. Obviously I was wrong. Good luck with it.
    lmao. Well, i attend one of the best colleges in the country having come from one of the worst schools!

    I stick to my words though. EMA is the best thing about college. Or right now it seems.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    Take a packed lunch and save your £10 a week for books then? :rolleyes:

    I have no objection to people who truly need it having it. I also don't think everyone should get it since clearly the rich don't need it.

    HOWEVER I think that for the most part the idea is absolutely abhorrent. Why the hell does the government think it's a good idea to bribe kids to stay in school? And why oh why is it given to the kids in cash, rather than in vouchers, or directly to the parents in household expenses?
    Because the whole point is to make the kids want to go to college (although I disagree with that notion). Kids wouldn't be tempted to go to college if they got book vouchers or even if their parents got money because they would never see it. Plus, there's a limit to the amount of books someone can possibly want. I won numerous book vouchers for coming top of my year in high school and I've still got the vast majority now (about £40 worth of book vouchers I'm probably never going to spend). Personally, I went through A level without needing to buy a single book.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    Take a packed lunch and save your £10 a week for books then? :rolleyes:

    I have no objection to people who truly need it having it. I also don't think everyone should get it since clearly the rich don't need it.

    HOWEVER I think that for the most part the idea is absolutely abhorrent. Why the hell does the government think it's a good idea to bribe kids to stay in school? And why oh why is it given to the kids in cash, rather than in vouchers, or directly to the parents in household expenses?
    If you earn - sorry, if the person(s) you live with - earn over 30k a year, does that class as 'rich'? I wouldn't say it does.
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    As for the person who said that High Earners have loads of cash lying around, that's a load of ****. My dad's a high earner, but was late onto the property ladder as he was serving Queen and Country in the RAF. Hence, he has a massive mortgage. My sister and I also have music lessons. This was essential for me last year as I was doing A level music. These lessons came to £35 a week. My sister is hoping to go to stage school so has to have singing, acting and dancing lessons. (she's not just one of those kids with pushy parents, she was going to do her grade 8 singing when she was 11, you normally dont do that til you're 18). My dad doesn't have a lot of money lying around because as he's a high earner he gets taxed til kingdom come. If he earned less, he'd actually be better off at the end of the month, but atm he works every hour god sends, driving 2 hours a day just to earn money to keep a roof over our heads. So no, I would have to say that the higher earners actually end up with less "free money" at the end of the month.

    I didn't get a penny in EMA due to my dad's income. I'm now working full time and paying a hell of a lot of tax, I don't see why I should have to pay for some scrotty little chav to go to college when they say got DDDD in their GCSEs (the minimum to get on vocational courses) when they just go to college for the money.

    A friend of mine went to a music school, which was private. Her dad owns a very successful restaurant and earns a hell of a lot of money. But oh dear, he's self employed. B***** that means she must get EMA. That's right, she went to a private school, but left there with at least a grand in the bank...

    And people using the money for driving lessons, i agree with that. Makes it easier to get to college!
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    (Original post by Azzle)
    A friend of mine went to a music school, which was private. Her dad owns a very successful restaurant and earns a hell of a lot of money. But oh dear, he's self employed. B***** that means she must get EMA. That's right, she went to a private school, but left there with at least a grand in the bank...
    ^

    Being self employed means nothing, self employed people still have to send proof of their income like employed people or those on benefits.
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    If you're self employed they take the line that you could lose your source of income at any point and you wont get a redundancy package or anything. Or so that's what i've been told
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    (Original post by Noobish)
    Tell me about it, :rolleyes: Are you kidding me? Tell me any parent who pay their children £30 everyweek along with BONUSES for Christmas holidays and all the exams throughout the lower sixth and upper sixth.
    Some probably do - given that I happen to know the family who are the heirs of the Brake Brothers business (and believe me that's a *lot* of money), it's not beyond the realms of possibility.

    My family and I are not anywhere near that league of richness and I still wouldn't say we need it, because very few kids *need* £30 a week spending money. Your point is?
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    (Original post by Noobish)
    ^^^You said rich parents clearly didnt need their children to get EMA so you are suggesting that rich parents give their children as much as we get with EMA?
    I already answered that. I said some probably do, and that it isn't beyond the realms of possibility for some richer families.

    (Original post by Noobish)
    Btw £30 a week spending money is infact alot of money for a 16/17 yr old child. And it isnt just £30 a week :p:. May i recall Bonuses! and i just got £160 this morning which in the afternoon i spent on some gadgets and electronic stuff!
    People like you make me sick, by the way. Goodnight.
 
 
 
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